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Monday, May 29, 2017

Bill Thorley Wins 10K Guam Cocos Crossing

Courtesy of Kenneth Thorley, Cocos Lagoon, Guam.

The 2017 Guam Cocos Crossing was held on May 28th at Merizo Pier, at the southernmost tip of Guam.

230 entrants swam one of 3 distances: 2.5 miles, 5 km, or 10 km in the clear 80°F (26°C) waters of Guam.

The race, in its 25th year, is held in Cocos Lagoon in a semi-protected open ocean course along a small atoll located on the reef. Within the deep channel running through the course, sea turtles, manta rays, jellyfish and reef sharks are visible.

The 5 km course and 10 km race follow the same triangle course that starts and ends at the Merizo Pier, with the 10 km race completing the course twice. The 2.5-mile race starts on Cocos Island and finishes at the pier. The Neptune Swim is the same as the 2.5-mile swim, but allows swimmers to use masks, snorkels and fins.

"The 2.5-mile race was won by Tasi Limtiaco (male) and Anna Sakaue (female)," reported Kenneth Thorley.

"Most competitors felt the race was probably longer than the advertised distance, and times suggested the course was probably closer to 6 km. Both distances started together as one wave, which meant the first 5 km was particularly competitive. 14-year-old boys Mark Imazu from Guam and Bill Thorley from Hong Kong raced together for the first lap, with Imazu drafting tightly behind Thorley, before Thorley turned the corner and continued on to complete a second lap to win the 10 km event, while Imazu proceeded straight to the finish line and claim the 5 km winner’s trophy."

The first female in the 5 km event was Mineri Gomez from Guam.

10 km Guam Cocos Crossing Results by Division
Women, 40-49 years
1. Monica Cardenas OTL 4 hours 14 minutes
Men, 11-14 years
1. Bill Thorley 2 hours 36 minutes 43 seconds
Men, 30-39 years
1. Jaekyu Yu 3 hours 50 minutes 24 seconds
DNF Shin Miyagi
Men, 40-49 years
DNF Kenichi Horibata
Men, 50-65 years
1. Kurt Kemppainen 3 hours 22 minutes 43 seconds

5 km Guam Cocos Crossing Results by Division
Women, 9-10 years
1. Maeve Robbins 2 hours 3 minutes 24 seconds
Women, 11-14 years
1. Ella Fedenko 2 hours 1 minutes 10 seconds
2. Sameha Willbanks 2 hours 27 minutes 27 seconds
DNF Alessandra Giovenco
Women, 15-17 years
1. Mineri Gomez 1 hour 34 minutes 47 seconds
2. Amanda Poppe 1 hour 37 minutes 30 seconds
3. Emilia Zervoulakos 2 hours 19 minutes 38 seconds
4. Kateless McCormick 2 hour 14 minutes 6 seconds
Women, 18-29 years
1. Sarah Johnson 1 hour 45 minutes 48 seconds
2. Rosalie Wolborsky 1 hour 54 minutes 23 seconds
3. Bethany Stallings 1 hour 54 minutes 56 seconds
4. Amanda Watts 1 hour 55 minutes 15 seconds
5. Lexi Gambrell 2 hours 2 minutes 42 seconds
6. Carla Santelli 2 hours 2 minutes 45 seconds
7. Ryan Corrigan 2 hours 2 minutes 50 seconds
8. Kristin Linn 2 hours 8 minutes 49 seconds
9. Elizabeth Corbett 2 hours 16 minutes 35 seconds
10. Suzanne Papadakos 2 hours 21 minutes 32 seconds
11. Esther Lam 2 hours 50 minutes 11 seconds
12. Nicole Harkness 2 hours 57 minutes 33 seconds
13. Emily Engel 3 hours 54 minutes 27 seconds
Women, 30-39 years
1. Jayme Bograd 1 hour 35 minutes 42 seconds
2. Kristina Woesner 2 hours 2 minutes 36 seconds
3. Laura Welch 2 hours 16 minutes 18 seconds
4. Jennifer Camacho 2 hours 19 minutes 43 seconds
Women, 40-49 years
1. Elaine Kwok 1 hour 52 minutes 17 seconds
2. Naoko Onoshita 1 hour 52 minutes 35 seconds
3. Kristina Ingvarsson 2 hours 7 minutes 51 seconds
4. Mel Torre 2 hours 20 minutes 1 second
Women, 50-65 years
1. Yukie Watahiki 2 hours 20 minutes 4 seconds
2. Betty Wresch 2 hours 52 minutes 6 seconds

5 km Guam Cocos Crossing Results by Division
Men, 9-10 years
1. Israel Poppe 1 hour 36 minutes 12 seconds
2. William O'Donnell 1 hour 36 minutes 27 seconds
Men, 11-14 years
1. Mark Imazu 1 hour 16 minutes 16 seconds
2. Leo Robbins 1 hour 39 minutes 19 seconds
3. Christian Harver 1 hour 53 minutes 11 seconds
4. Carlos Poppe 2 hours 5 minutes 56 seconds
DNF Jonathan Borja
Men, 15-17 years
1. Tanner Poppe 1 hour 27 minutes 4 seconds
2. Gray Harver 1 hour 44 minutes 52 seconds
3. Miguel Jugo 1 hour 44 minutes 57 seconds
DNF Gabriel Giovenco
DNF Zachary Zmijski
Men, 18-29 years
1. Andrew Mays 1 hour 21 minutes 59 seconds
2. Paul Beauchamp 1 hour 37 minutes 17 seconds
3. Elijah Mafnas 2 hours 7 minutes 42 seconds
4. Brian Shepherd 2 hours 13 minutes 43 seconds
5. Patrick Waller 2 hours 18 minutes 12 seconds
6. Marc Simm 2 hours 19 minutes 51 seconds
Men, 30-39 years
1. Yeong Park Geun 1 hour 18 minutes 34 seconds
2. Thomas O'Donnell 1 hour 36 minutes 30 seconds
3. Steve Testa 1 hour 38 minutes 13 seconds
4. Gennady Belyshey 1 hour 53 minutes 45 seconds
5. Nathan Bingaman 2 hours 4 minutes 47 seconds
6. Andrew Joseph Layson 2 hours 18 minutes 24 seconds
7. Ryan Shipman 2 hours 30 minutes 59 seconds
Men, 40-49 years
1. Duncan Horne 1 hour 44 minutes 45 seconds
2. Teruo Sato 1 hour 46 minutes 35 seconds
3. Shunichi Onoshita 1 hour 53 minutes 17 seconds
4. Zach Vierckz 1 hour 55 minutes 21 seconds
5. Langan Robbins 2 hours 3 minutes 24 seconds
6. James Nichols 2 hours 11 minutes 21 seconds
7. Jeremy Willbanks 2 hours 27 minutes 43 seconds
8. Edgardo Calumaya 2 hours 53 minutes 42 seconds
Men, 50-65 years
1. Tor Gudmundsen 1 hour 39 minutes 10 seconds
2. Jim Maher 1 hour 49 minutes 13 seconds
3. Nike Inoue 1 hour 50 minutes 23 seconds
4. Minseog Yang 1 hour 57 minutes 45 seconds
5. Guerrero Leon 1 hour 58 minutes 16 seconds
6. Stephen Wolborsky 2 hours 24 minutes 47 seconds
DNF Hae Kwan Cheong
DNF Ken Thorley
Men, 66+ years
1. Akira Akutsu 1 hour 46 minutes 45 seconds
2. Kilhak Kunimoto 2 hours 23 minutes 29 seconds
3. George Zervoulakos 2 hours 23 minutes 45 seconds
4. Ray Vierck 2 hours 26 minutes 22 seconds



Upper photo shows Bill Thorley crossing the finish line as winner of the 10 km Guam Cocos Crossing.

For more information, visit www.guamcocoscrossing.com.

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