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Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Butterflying From Smuggler's Cove To Doctor's Cove

Courtesy of Catalina Channel Swimming Federation.

Catalina Channel Swimming Federation announced the 17 hour 14 minute butterfly crossing of the Catalina Channel by John Batchelder.

After departing from Smuggler's Cove in the early morning, Catalina Channel Swimming Federation reported, "Batchelder swam upstream in rough sea conditions before landing at Doctor's Cove on Catalina Island.

John is the third solo swimmer to swim butterfly across the channel and he is the first to swim butterfly from the mainland to Catalina.

Veteran Catalina Channel swimmer Rebecca Nevitt was on board the Pacific Star as John’s crew chief, as well as marathon swimmer extraordinaire Sarah Thomas who was on board to support John's swim.

John York, Dan Simonelli and Lynn Kubasek observed the swim for the Catalina Channel Swimming Federation
."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The World of Open Water Swimming Presented Tomorrow

Photo of Sarah Thomas courtesy of Andrew Malinak; ice swimming photo of Nuala Moore.

The Naples Island Swim & SUP event is sponsoring a 2-hour presentation on The World of Open Water Swimming on July 18th from 6-8 pm at the United States Sailing Center in Long Beach, California.

Steven Munatones of the World Open Water Swimming Association will present a comprehensive historical view of the sport of open water swimming, from the days of samurai over 500 years ago to the contemporary marathon swims of Sarah Thomas.

He will be joined by Dan Simonelli of the Open Water Swim Academy.

The Open Water Swim Academy was nominated for the 2017 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year and offers a safe and supportive environment for teaching and training open water swimmers, no matter what their starting point or final goals are.

Led by Simonelli, one of the world's most active and successful coaches, crew chief, and escort kayaker, recreational, masters and competitive swimmers are taught a comprehensive curriculum of technical, environmental, mental and physical aspects of open water swimming. He shares the best techniques and tactics both in the pool and Pacific Ocean, teaches myriad aspects of open water swimming from swim techniques and nutrition to marine life and goal setting.

Topics will cover a detailed tactical view of the men's and women's 2016 Olympic 10 km marathon swim in Rio de Janeiro, the origins of the International Ice Swimming Association and the future of ice swimming, stage swimming around the world, marathon and channel swimming, wild swimming, swimming by septuagenarians and octogenarians, and bucket swim around the world.

Race director Greg Shea added, "We will also describe the history of Naples Island Swim and how best to swim around the island in Long Beach. All swimmers registered for the Naples Island Swim by July 15th are invited to attend for free this very special event. There will also be special guests [to be announced shortly] who will share their open water swimming experiences that will inspire us."

The World of Open Water Swimming will be hosted at the United States Sailing Center in Long Beach, California located 5489 E Ocean Blvd, Long Beach, California 90803 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm on July 18th along the shores of the 1932 Los Angeles Olympic Games rowing basin.

For more information on the 2018 Naples Island Swim & SUP on August 12th, visit here.



Above photos from the 2017 event include Megan Monroy escorting women's 3-mile winner Lexie Kelly, and drafting by veterans including Parks Wesson.

Photo below shows 47-year-old 2017 overall winner Alex Kostich facing 15-year-old Brandon Samaniego.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Long Swim - Lewis Pugh's Along The Channel

Photos courtesy of Kelvin Trautman, English Channel, UK.

Lewis Pugh is now on Day 5 of The Long Swim along the length of the English Channel. He reports, "It’s been quite an ordeal. It’s very technical to round the headlands - the tides are like rivers. The tides are such that I can swim for about 2 hours on each eastward moving tide. If I swim outside of those 2 hours, I go backwards."

Ther has been a vast amount of media coverage, both domestically in England and globally, including coverage on Sky News in the UK. "Lots of people have asked whether they can swim sections with me. I think this is a fantastic opportunity to promote open water swimming and raise awareness of plastic pollution in our oceans."

The 48-year-old is being escorted by pilot Stephen Praetorious with writer Jacqui L'Ange, first mate Rowan Fernando, trainer Nicola Johnson, chef Denise Wilson, photographer Kelvin Trautman, and Chief of Staff David Bush onboard the Aquila on the estimated 50-day stage swim.

Day 1 on July 12th (Swim #1)
Pugh spent 2 hours 12 minutes in the Channel swimming 3 nautical miles (5.55 km) on a ebb tide in 14.3°C water, starting at Sennen Cove - White Sands Beach and finishing at Carn Boel in Force 3 conditions. He started out by swimming at a 52 strokes per minute pace straight out from the coast, parallel to the headland where the conditions fair, but angry in places. He swam past lobster pots and then went fast around the headland of Land's End. When the tide turned, he stopped making progress and exited the water where his watch indicted that he burned 1965 calories.

Day 1 on July 12th (Swim #2)
Pugh spent 1 hours 37 minutes in the Channel swimming 2.3 nautical miles (4.25 km) on a ebb tide in 16°C water, starting east of Runnel Stone in Force 4 conditions. He started by swimming fast on the 'Land's End conveyer belt' and swam through the Runnel Stone. He later swam too close to the cliffs and close to the coastline in a very calm sea.

Day 2 on July 13th (Swim #1)
Pugh spent 2 hours 6 minutes in the Channel swimming 4.1 nautical miles (7.6 km) on a ebb tide in 16°C water in Force 2 conditions, starting east of Runnel Stone and finishing off Tetter du Point. He swam further out to sea to take full advantage of the spring tide.

Day 2 on July 13th (Swim #2)
Pugh spent 1 hour 31 minutes in the Channel swimming 3.05 nautical miles (5.6 km) on a ebb tide in 16°C water, starting near Tetter du Point and finishing in the middle of Mount's Bay. He swam at 50 strokes per minute, got stung by jellyfish with a knot of current going with him.

Day 3 on July 14th (Swim #1)
Pugh spent 2 hours 1 minute in the Channel swimming 9.6 km on a ebb tide in 16.2°C water, starting in the middle of Mount's Bay and finishing off Lizard Point. He swam at 50 strokes per minute along a line of kelp that mirrored the tide and a 2.5 knot current. He got stung by jellyfish with a pod of dolphin pod spotted ahead.

Day 3 on July 14th (Swim #2)
Pugh spent 55 minutes in the Channel swimming 3 nautical miles (4.87 km) on a ebb tide in 16°C water, starting and finishing near Lizard Point. On Day 3, he swam at 53 strokes per minute along a line of kelp and lots of dark purple jellyfish as the tide pushed him him out to sea.

Day 4 on July 15th (Swim #1)
Pugh spent 1 hour 19 minutes in the Channel swimming 2.3 nautical miles (4.26 km) on a flood tide, starting near Lizard Point Station and finishing near Lizard Point Lighthouse. He swam at 45° to the headland due to strong currents ("the strongest in my life"). Rowan uses the tender to escort Pugh around the rocks. He decided to continue swimming around the point later in the day. The water temperature was 12°C with a Force 2 conditions (southwest winds).

Day 4 on July 15th (Swim #2)
Pugh spent 1 hour 22 minutes in the Channel swimming 1.2 nautical miles (2.2 km) on a flood tide, starting near the Bass Point Coast Guard Station and finishing near Lizard Point Lighthouse. He swam near shoals of whitebait and struggled against counter-eddies without making much progress at 50 strokes per minute. The water temperature decreased from 19°C to 13°C during the stage.

Day 5 on July 16th
Pugh spent 1 hours 27 minutes in the Channel swimming 3 nautical miles (5.56 km) on a flood tide, starting near the Bass Point Coast Guard Station. He swam at an average of 52 strokes per minute in a jellyfish-strewn area as he swam on both sides of his escort boat Aquila during the swim in an effort to avoid jellyfish blooms. The water temperature increased from 12-13°C to 19°C during the stage.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Traversing Through Trash

Courtesy of Paul Lecomte, Pacific Ocean.

After only swimming 1.74 nautical miles on July 14th, Ben Lecomte knocked off 23.26 nautical miles on July 15th and 27.49 nautical miles on July 16th on The Swim where he is nearly 500 nautical miles off the coast of Japan.

But there was no swimming today. Although everyone is safe onboard Seeker, the mother ship of The Swim, Lecomte and his team is currently facing a series of squalls. Crew chief Paul Lecomte reports, "The state of the ocean is not safe for the escort kayaker. This situation will probably continue the same tomorrow.

We are looking at potential 1-day offshore rendezvous in Japan in the next few days to replace our dinghy engine parts and other equipment
."

Over the last 32 days, the crew on the Seeker has encountered storms, squalls, massive cargo ships, sharks, whales, dolphins and turtles while Lecomte has swam through countless amounts of plastic garbage.

Seeker released a video [see here] as part of #PlasticFreeJuly that documents the large amounts of plastic trash Lecomte is swimming through and seeing on a daily basis. Discoveries include everything from plastic water bottles to large coolers, shoes, balloons and more.

His team explains, "Tracking plastic pollution in the marine environment is a big part of Ben's mission on The Swim. We are collecting microplastics from the net attached to the ship, separating the pieces and particles in the lab, and conserving the microbiomes that grew on the largest pieces of plastic. Our goal is to track changes in the ecosystem caused by the plastic garbage and raise awareness to limit the amount of single use plastic we are using every day."

For additional videos and reports from The Swim, a 8,721 km transoceanic stage swim across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to California is nearly 10% finished after one month on the Pacific Ocean, visit here.

Lecomte is currently riding along the Kuroshio Current under the guidance of skipper Yoav Nevo.

For more details, visit benlecomte.com. The daily logbook is posted here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Monday, July 16, 2018

John Batchelder Making The Unthinkable Doable

Courtesy of Track.RS, Catalina Channel, California.

John Batchelder set out this morning from the Southern California mainland at 7:06 am this morning from Smuggler's Cove on an unthinkable, unprecedented two-way butterfly crossing of the Santa Catalina Channel.

His tracker of his 64.6 km butterfly swim is here and shown above. The water temperature is currently 71°F (21.6°C).

See the final result here (Butterflying From Smuggler's Cove To Doctor's Cove). Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Batchelor Is One Tough Guy

Courtesy of Catalina Channel Swimming Federation, Catalina Channel, California.

Guy Batchelor became the 182nd person in history to complete the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming with today's 32.3 km crossing of the Catalina Channel from the Santa Catalina Island to the Southern California mainland in 12 hours 4 minutes.

The retired British Armed Forces Captain is coached by Nick Adams with crew chief Stephanie Hopson, escort kayaker Dan Simonelli, and observers Marc Horwitz and Bob Shumway.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Gino Does Triple Crown Of Open Water Swimming

Courtesy of WOWSA, Manhattan Island, New York.

51-year-old attorney Eugene 'Gino' Hanrahan completed the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming, with his 7 hour 26 minute 20 Bridges Manhattan Swim in New York on July 14th

Hanraham is shown on left after finishing a crossing of the Catalina Channel in 9 hours 36 minutes.

Becoming a Triple Crowner took some time. Back in 2007 at the age of 40, he completed his first leg, a 33.8 km crossing of the English Channel from England to France in 11 hours 21 minutes.

Kristian Rutford also completed a swim of note in the race, finishing his 22nd career circumnavigation swim around Manhattan Island, dating back to his first completion in 1988.

20 Bridges Manhattan Swim Results:
1. Nathan Payas (39) 7 hours 21 minutes 0 seconds
2. Eduardo Collazos (47) 7 hours 21 minutes 13 seconds
3. Anna Strachan (44) 7 hours 24 minutes 1 second
4. Eugene Hanrahan (51) 7 hours 26 minutes 40 seconds
5. Abigail Bergman (22) 7 hours 42 minutes 8 seconds
6. Kristian Rutford (59) 7 hours 49 minutes 24 seconds
7. Simon Olliver (54) 7 hours 51 minutes 39 seconds
8. Mäx Beer (47) 7 hours 52 minutes 33 seconds
9. William Schulz (52) 7 hours 58 minutes 0 seconds
10. Judy Caves (58) 8 hours 4 minutes 42 seconds
11. Cormac Mac Cionnaith (45) 8 hours 18 minutes 48 seconds
12. Susan Kirk (58) 8 hours 26 minutes 29 seconds
12. Carlos Acosta (45) 8 hours 22 minutes 48 seconds
14. Andreas Kaubisch (54) 8 hours 27 minutes 28 seconds
DNF Dionne Tatlow (33) 7 hours 37 minutes 5 seconds

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Nathan Payas Does Triple Crown Of Open Water Swimming

Courtesy of WOWSA, Manhattan Island, New York.

The July 14th edition of the 20 Bridges Manhattan Swim was a smoother, faster circumnavigation swim around Manhattan Island in New York than its previous version.

39-year-old Nathan Payas from Gibraltar not only won the race, but also completed the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming, one of his many career achievements including setting a record in an unprecedented 24 km Double Round the Rock of Gibraltar.

His time of 7 hours 21 minutes was the last leg of the Triple Crown after his 9 hour 13 minute crossing of the English Channel in 2016 and his 9 hour 34 minute crossing of the Catalina Channel in 2017. It served as a charity swim [see here].

20 Bridges Manhattan Swim Results:
1. Nathan Payas (39) 7 hours 21 minutes 0 seconds
2. Eduardo Collazos (47) 7 hours 21 minutes 13 seconds
3. Anna Strachan (44) 7 hours 24 minutes 1 second
4. Eugene Hanrahan (51) 7 hours 26 minutes 40 seconds
5. Abigail Bergman (22) 7 hours 42 minutes 8 seconds
6. Kristian Rutford (59) 7 hours 49 minutes 24 seconds
7. Simon Olliver (54) 7 hours 51 minutes 39 seconds
8. Mäx Beer (47) 7 hours 52 minutes 33 seconds
9. William Schulz (52) 7 hours 58 minutes 0 seconds
10. Judy Caves (58) 8 hours 4 minutes 42 seconds
11. Cormac Mac Cionnaith (45) 8 hours 18 minutes 48 seconds
12. Susan Kirk (58) 8 hours 26 minutes 29 seconds
12. Carlos Acosta (45) 8 hours 22 minutes 48 seconds
14. Andreas Kaubisch (54) 8 hours 27 minutes 28 seconds
DNF Dionne Tatlow (33) 7 hours 37 minutes 5 seconds

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sunday, July 15, 2018

What Goes Round Comes Around For Andy Truscott

Courtesy of WOWSA, Jersey, California.

Ever since Denize Le Pennec pioneered the first Round Jersey swim around the Isle of Jersey in the English Channel in 1969, the 66 km circumnavigation swim has been successfully completed 123 times by people around the world.

It took nearly 50 years for Andy Truscott to complete the first double circumnavigation of Jersey.

His unprecedented 132 km Double Round Island of Jersey took him 22 hours 7 minutes with a 10 hour 35 minute first loop and an 11 hour 32 minute second loop on July 15th.

The Double Round Island swim was his third career record marathon over the past three years. His first record in the Channel Islands was an 18 km crossing from Les Minquiers to Jersey completed in 2016 (7 hours 17 minutes). His second record was his 45 km two-way crossing between Jersey and France completed in 2017 (16 hours 39 minutes).

Samantha Jones commented, "[His swim] was simply incredible, not a single complaint, just ploughed on and got the job done."

Truscott, whose favorite motto is 'What goes round, comes around,' was grateful for the opportunity, "Thanks to Matthew Clarke and Sam Jones and Richard Billot of Lionheart Pilotage. Thanks to my crew Robin Johnson, Katherine Lowe and Alice Harvey. Also would like to acknowledge Chantelle Le Guilcher and Mark Chegwin who were part of crew but due to numbers had to stay on land.

Thanks to Dee Richards and Jenny Fitzgerald for observing. Thanks to the team behind the team Kirsty White for massage, James Lindsay for social media update through SportsHub, Kit Chamier for nutrition, and to Kim Love, Laila DG and Helen for being supportive and following all night. Biggest thanks go to Sharon Truscott and Alexandra Bland for helping look after kids and being supportive
."

Video courtesy of Samantha Jones.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

It's Complicated

Courtesy of WOWSA, Pacific Ocean.

Swimmers trying to cross the Tsugaru Channel between Honshu and Hokkaido in northern Japan [see image on left] frequently encounter eddies, swirling circling current of ocean water. These eddies either serve to delay or - at worse - lead to a channel crossing being stopped. Winds, the prevailing Tsugaru Current moving from west to east from the Sea of Japan to the Pacific Ocean, and the topography of the Japanese land mass on either side of the Tsugaru Channel lead to the creation of these currents.

Now imagine a much stronger and larger eddy in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. This is what Ben Lecomte is currently facing nearly 500 nautical miles off the eastern shores of Japan at the edges of the Kuroshio Current.

The Kuroshio is a warm-water current (with an average temperature of 24°C) that is about 100 km wide that produces frequent small to meso-scale eddies.

Those eddies can cause Lecomte and his team considerable problems, but yesterday was a good day.

Paul Lecomte explains, "We finally got back to the starting point this morning. The sea was very calm and we were able to do a full good session of swimming paced by the kayaker. We saw our usual whales - big ones - but we are crossing an area with a pretty high concentration of trash."

But the Lecomte's currently find themselves near the edges of the Kuroshio Current, a position that can present major navigational and logistical issues. In this area, it can take several hours for the escort boat to return to the specific point of exit the day before due to the oncoming current and winds. But if the team gets out of the current, then forward progress towards San Francisco becomes much more difficult. And if they get caught in eddies, then progress by the swimmer and boat becomes increasingly difficult.

Lecomte is being naturally pushed northwards due to the winds and currents so heading south is troublesome. On the other hand, going along a more northernly route may lead to significant drops in water temperature.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The First Month With Ben Lecomte On The Swim

Courtesy of Paul Lecomte, Pacific Ocean.

After the first 29 days of The Swim by Ben Lecomte, he has swum 469 nautical miles (869 km) off the coast of Japan.

His planned 8,721 km transoceanic stage swim across the Pacific Ocean from Japan to California is nearly 10% finished after one month on the Pacific Ocean.

Via satellite telephone, crew chief Paul Lecomte reported that marine life has been abundant: pods of whales, dolphins and turtles as well as jellyfish and sharks have been encountered on the swim.

The distance swum has been recorded while getting back to the precise location of the previous day's last GPS point has occupied much of their time and efforts to date:

June 5th - 10.08 nautical miles
June 6th - 17.12 nautical miles
June 7th - 0 nautical miles
June 8th - 0 nautical miles
June 9th - 0 nautical miles
June 10th - 0 nautical miles
June 11th - 0 nautical miles
June 12th - 0 nautical miles
June 13th - 0 nautical miles
June 14th - 4.14 nautical miles
June 15th - 5.56 nautical miles
June 16th - 0 nautical miles
June 17th - 7.09 nautical miles
June 18th - 5.53 nautical miles
June 19th - 3.84 nautical miles
June 20th - 0.95 nautical miles
June 21st - 1.01 nautical miles
June 22nd - 13.27 nautical miles
June 23rd - 18.87 nautical miles
June 24th - 24.78 nautical miles
June 25th - 16.81 nautical miles
June 26th - 32.79 nautical miles
June 27th - 0 nautical miles
June 28th - 0 nautical miles
June 29th - 23.21 nautical miles
June 30th - 20.62 nautical miles
July 1st - 25.75 nautical miles
July 2nd - 28.33 nautical miles
July 3rd - 43.6 nautical miles
July 4th - 5.37 nautical miles
July 5th - 0 nautical miles
July 6th - 4.82 nautical miles
July 7th - 26.84 nautical miles
July 8th - 21.3 nautical miles
July 9th - 21.57 nautical miles
July 10th - 19.17 nautical miles
July 11th - 24.09 nautical miles
July 12th - 16.28 nautical miles
July 13th - 26.21 nautical miles
July 14th - 1.74 nautical miles
July 15th - 23.26 nautical miles
July 16th - 27.49 nautical miles

On July 3rd, Lecomte was able to travel the furthest of any single day, 43.6 nautical miles (80.7 km riding the Kuroshio Current). He described the day as follows, "The high-pressure system was still with us, bringing with it great weather conditions for the day. Within the first hour I was in the water, Lauren [Horner] and Maks [Romeijn] screamed, 'Ben, there is a shark!'

I very quickly lifted up my head out of the water and looked into the direction they were pointed. I couldn’t see anything. Maks told me it just past us about 50 meters behind us and kept on its course. They could see its fins and approximated its size to 2.5 meters, a good size.

We stayed a couple of minutes at the same location and I tried to look below me for any sign of it, but I didn’t see anything, so I decided on resuming swimming. At hour 4, I started to experience some pain in my right ankle and removed my fins for a couple of hours to give them a rest. During those hours Lauren joined me for 2 hours. After that, I put my fins back on and didn’t feel any more pain.

I swam almost until the sunset, our skipper Yoav [Nevo] asked us to stop to make sure we had enough light to come back on Seeker and secure the RHIB in place.

Today the water was the warmest it had ever been
."

For more details, visit benlecomte.com. The daily logbook is posted here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Day 38: The Swim With Ben Lecomte

Courtesy of WOWSA, Pacific Ocean.

Day 38 on The Swim, Ben Lecomte's 8,721 km transoceanic stage swim across the Pacific Ocean was a short swim session because escort kayaker and environmental engineer María Cristi had trouble to keep up with Lecomte while battling against the waves.

Lecomte wrote, "This morning the wind and waves were coming from the north and were stronger than yesterday. We still had to progress toward the north and this was going to be a challenging day.

Maria was back in the kayak. She communicated a few times with the crew on the VHF to verify that we were going in the right direction. Each time we took a break to feed me we felt we were pushed back from where we came from. Maria was drifting in the opposite direction, the wind and waves dragged her much faster than me.

She was trying her hardest to keep the pace but she was paddling slower than I was swimming. After a few hours, I knew I wouldn’t be able to swim for a full 8 hours at that pace because it was too slow and I couldn’t generate enough heat to stay warm.

At midday, we had planned to have Paul [Lecomte] trade place with Maria. At that time Seeker wasn’t close to us, I could only see the top of the sails at the horizon.

Maria gave them our position and corrected it a few times as we were drifting fast. After 45 minutes Seeker finally reached us but by that time I had waited too long in the water and was cold, I decided to get back on the sailboat and stop swimming for the day
."

On Day 39, Lecomte's team explained their situation almost 500 miles from the mainland of Japan, "We had a full session as the wave angle was better. Last night we got into a squall, and were moved 20 nautical miles from the starting point. As a result, there was no swim today. We spent all day sailing and motoring back to the point, we should get there early morning for a new swim session."

Once in the water, Lecomte and his nephew Paul found the ocean conditions to be similar to the previous day: strong opposite wind and waves. He wrote, "Both of us were alone on that vast ocean, or at least it felt that way at times since [escort boat] Seeker was very far behind us. We could see the tip of the mast and the sails, but they couldn’t see us. Paul had to update [the escort crew] with our location throughout the day, staying in communication with them with the VHF radio was a must.

From the beginning of the day, Paul was very focused on keeping me at the right distance from the kayak, maintaining the right speed and making my feeding breaks as efficient as possible. I get cold very fast every time I stop swimming.

We did not talk a lot, we just kept it to the essentials. When he was paddling, I was swimming and reliving the moments we had together back in France. He probably does not remember them because he was an infant then, I babysat him on Monday afternoons. That happened right before I came to the US. After that, there were other moments we spent time together when I came back to France to visit, but nothing like what happened in the past 2 years since Paul has been working with me on The Swim. What a pleasure to have had the opportunity to spend time with my nephew and witness his dedication and how hard he had applied himself to see this dream of mine come to a realization
."

For more details, visit benlecomte.com.

Meanwhile, Lecomte's escort team received a series of 180 waypoints (see below) to San Francisco from Nikolai Maximenko, a Senior Researcher of Oceanography at the International Pacific Research Center, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii.

Waypoints 180 Days
1 36 13.006 149 20.452 75
2 36 22.783 149 55.456 90
3 36 26.266 150 32.009 105
4 36 19.017 151 8.837 120
5 36 4.226 151 43.669 120
6 35 44.910 152 16.679 120
7 35 25.428 152 54.648 120
8 35 3.875 153 36.823 120
9 34 50.252 154 16.752 105
10 34 37.828 154 53.012 105
11 34 29.207 155 28.482 90
12 34 27.840 156 0.801 90
13 34 46.183 156 30.735 75
14 34 54.530 157 4.279 90
15 34 47.528 157 35.093 90
16 34 50.417 158 7.898 75
17 35 6.611 158 43.412 75
18 35 24.663 159 13.339 75
19 35 37.487 159 40.655 75
20 35 38.664 160 11.081 75
21 35 31.925 160 42.048 90
22 35 23.762 161 13.046 75
23 35 23.969 161 43.545 75
24 35 30.351 162 12.968 90
25 35 32.982 162 42.072 90
26 35 32.306 163 9.724 90
27 35 31.722 163 39.326 90
28 35 39.137 164 13.571 75
29 35 57.574 164 51.771 60
30 36 14.030 165 28.420 60
31 36 25.781 165 59.980 60
32 36 36.929 166 25.928 60
33 36 50.793 166 51.417 60
34 37 9.100 167 19.439 75
35 37 19.752 167 53.506 75
36 37 28.336 168 29.999 75
37 37 29.727 169 3.135 75
38 37 32.154 169 32.931 75
39 37 35.914 169 59.682 75
40 37 37.101 170 25.659 75
41 37 37.243 170 52.978 90
42 37 38.952 171 21.719 90
43 37 45.417 171 52.292 90
44 37 48.951 172 26.666 90
45 37 49.648 173 2.887 75
46 37 53.413 173 35.285 75
47 37 59.685 174 3.551 60
48 38 12.453 174 26.852 60
49 38 22.775 174 52.547 60
50 38 30.751 175 19.388 60
51 38 37.807 175 45.650 60
52 38 46.260 176 11.284 60
53 38 55.574 176 36.376 60
54 39 5.939 177 0.511 75
55 39 13.209 177 26.991 75
56 39 18.960 177 53.566 75
57 39 25.386 178 20.814 60
58 39 37.248 178 46.769 60
59 39 48.439 179 12.881 60
60 39 59.596 179 37.689 60
61 40 11.157 180 3.815 75
62 40 16.619 180 33.853 75
63 40 21.411 181 4.436 75
64 40 27.026 181 34.147 75
65 40 33.047 182 3.879 75
66 40 37.908 182 34.156 75
67 40 42.224 183 3.608 75
68 40 46.544 183 33.781 75
69 40 51.562 184 3.424 75
70 40 57.909 184 32.013 75
71 41 3.795 185 0.262 75
72 41 9.263 185 28.847 75
73 41 14.285 185 57.035 75
74 41 19.611 186 25.988 75
75 41 24.679 186 54.851 75
76 41 30.129 187 24.131 75
77 41 36.231 187 54.062 75
78 41 42.265 188 23.729 75
79 41 47.868 188 52.958 75
80 41 53.201 189 22.000 75
81 41 58.543 189 50.966 75
82 42 3.929 190 19.846 75
83 42 9.188 190 48.276 75
84 42 14.624 191 16.523 90
85 42 14.892 191 45.809 90
86 42 14.908 192 15.405 90
87 42 14.823 192 44.568 90
88 42 15.074 193 13.541 75
89 42 21.051 193 41.877 75
90 42 27.362 194 10.100 75
91 42 33.426 194 38.865 75
92 42 38.569 195 7.227 75
93 42 43.591 195 35.833 75
94 42 48.943 196 4.783 75
95 42 54.699 196 34.173 75
96 43 0.406 197 3.888 75
97 43 6.036 197 33.598 75
98 43 11.363 198 3.030 75
99 43 16.704 198 32.108 90
100 43 16.841 199 1.670 90
101 43 16.805 199 31.118 90
102 43 16.688 200 0.820 90
103 43 16.596 200 30.872 90
104 43 16.329 201 1.141 90
105 43 16.313 201 31.069 75
106 43 21.686 202 0.146 90
107 43 21.954 202 30.115 90
108 43 21.977 203 0.222 90
109 43 22.305 203 30.345 90
110 43 22.772 204 0.469 90
111 43 22.748 204 30.560 90
112 43 22.697 205 0.594 90
113 43 22.698 205 30.759 90
114 43 22.845 206 0.433 90
115 43 22.755 206 30.255 90
116 43 22.654 207 0.191 90
117 43 22.860 207 29.973 90
118 43 22.783 208 0.341 90
119 43 22.318 208 30.771 90
120 43 22.277 209 0.753 90
121 43 22.124 209 30.950 90
122 43 22.153 210 1.062 90
123 43 22.654 210 31.191 90
124 43 22.818 211 1.388 90
125 43 22.329 211 31.081 90
126 43 21.898 212 0.653 90
127 43 21.906 212 30.244 105
128 43 17.061 212 58.693 105
129 43 11.829 213 27.321 105
130 43 6.074 213 56.011 105
131 43 0.572 214 24.474 105
132 42 55.214 214 52.726 90
133 42 55.168 215 21.748 105
134 42 50.073 215 49.698 105
135 42 45.507 216 17.566 105
136 42 40.335 216 45.297 105
137 42 34.442 217 12.839 90
138 42 34.177 217 41.160 90
139 42 34.119 218 9.243 105
140 42 29.056 218 36.638 105
141 42 24.115 219 4.139 105
142 42 18.766 219 31.804 105
143 42 13.340 219 59.624 105
144 42 7.689 220 27.549 105
145 42 1.693 220 54.794 105
146 41 55.670 221 21.918 105
147 41 49.327 221 48.839 105
148 41 43.165 222 15.615 105
149 41 37.020 222 43.098 105
150 41 31.101 223 11.290 105
151 41 24.890 223 40.216 105
152 41 18.423 224 8.090 105
153 41 11.753 224 35.470 105
154 41 5.066 225 2.321 105
155 40 58.889 225 29.227 105
156 40 52.947 225 56.536 105
157 40 46.705 226 24.151 105
158 40 40.782 226 52.126 105
159 40 34.365 227 20.557 105
160 40 28.694 227 48.026 105
161 40 22.884 228 14.029 105
162 40 17.598 228 40.148 105
163 40 12.176 229 5.355 105
164 40 5.997 229 30.957 105
165 39 59.471 229 56.570 105
166 39 52.183 230 21.300 120
167 39 40.783 230 44.243 120
168 39 30.093 231 7.181 120
169 39 17.224 231 28.516 105
170 39 8.579 231 52.406 105
171 39 2.590 232 19.255 105
172 38 58.238 232 46.900 90
173 38 58.634 233 14.833 90
174 38 59.895 233 42.765 105
175 38 54.101 234 9.873 105
176 38 44.507 234 34.190 105
177 38 33.468 234 56.196 105
178 38 25.613 235 21.362 105
179 38 19.473 235 47.545 105
180 38 13.143 236 11.664 105
181 38 7.961 236 36.280 105

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Cross-border Cruising For Cryptozoological Creatures

Courtesy of Phil White, Lake Memphremagog, Vermont.

On Wednesday, July 18, 2018, seven marathon open water swimmers will gather to swim the 25-mile length of Lake Memphremagog, between Newport, Vermont, USA and Magog, Quebec, Canada.

In Search of Memphre is a 40.2 km (25-mile) cross-border marathon swim across Lake Memphremagog.

Phil White started the event on the 10th anniversary of 9/11 in order to promote a more open border with our Canadian friends, to search for the legendary cryptozoological creature, Memphré, and to do some good along the way.

Swimmer Scouts:
* 14-year-old Vera Rivard
* 57-year-old Eric Schall
* 41-year-old Mary Stella Stabinsky
* 37-year-old Sharessa Gutierrez
* 34-year-old Sandra Frimerman-Bergquist
* 69-year-old Dan Shub
* 38-year-old Cara Manlandro

White explains, "They are joined by 26 others in support of the swim, serving as escort and patrol boat pilots, crew, and ground personnel. They will depart at 5:00 am on July 18th and are expected to cross the border into Canada between 7 am and 8 am. Border crossing has been facilitated by Canadian law enforcement which has reviewed the roster of participants and pre-approved the crossing. United States Border officials have also been extremely helpful in facilitating crossings.

The 16-foot aluminum escort boats with caged propellers are rented from TriMemphre in Magog, Québec, Canada. Swimmers and crew will be shuttled back to Newport by Jay Peak which has supported this swim for many years. The City of Magog has been most gracious, arranging for use of the beach at Parc de le Baie de Magog for our landing and the docking of our boats overnight after the swim. The support of Community National Bank and RDI also helped to make this swim possible.

If successful, Rivard would be the youngest to swim the length of the lake and Shub would be the oldest. In 2018, we have at least 60 swimmers undertaking swims of various distances - from 10 km to 25 miles - that involve crossing the U.S. and Canadian border
."

This year’s class of Swimmer Scouts have dedicated their swims to the Asylum Seekers and are encouraging donations to the Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project. Several of the swimmers, their support, and their families come from backgrounds of seeking asylum in the United States from horrific and dangerous conditions in their nations of origin.

The swim is organized and supported by Kingdom Games which now hosts over 25 days of running, biking, swimming, and ice skating in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont and the Eastern Townships of Quebec. For more information, visit www.kingdomgames.co or contact Phil White at phw1948@gmail.com.



Race Data: September 10th 2011
1. Elizabeth Fry 13 hours 25 minutes
2. Charlotte Brynn 14 hours 40 minutes
3. Greg O'Connor 17 hours 23 minutes
4. Elaine Kornblau Howley 17 hours 58 minutes

Race Data: September 10th 2012
1. David Dammerman 11 hours 27 minutes
2. Bill Shipp 12 hours 38 minutes
3. Lori Carena 15 hours 1 minute
4. Jennifer Dunton 15 hours 6 minutes
5. David Barra 15 hours 15 minutes
6. Aurora Gore 15 hours 45 minutes

Race Data: September 7th 2013
1. Sarah Thomas 14 hours 46 minutes (followed by a 15 hour 9 minute return leg for a 30 hour 1 minute two-way crossing)
2. Bethany Bosch 17 hours 11 minutes

Race Data: September 7th 2014
1. Grace van der Byl 11 hours 33 minutes
2. David Uprichard 15 hours 59 minutes
3. Paula Yankauskas 17 hours 59 minutes

Race Data: September 5th 2015
1. Katie Benoit 15 hours 25 minutes
2. Amanda Hunt 17 hours 8 minutes

Race Data: September 11th 2016
1. Mark Smitherman 13 hours 46 minutes

Race Data: September 11th 2017
1. Cindy Werhane 13 hours 17 minutes
2. John Batchelder 17 hours 9 minutes
3. Kate Howell 17 hours 47 minutes

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Open Water Swimming Heroes In The 20th Century

Courtesy of Catalina Channel Swimming Federation, Catalina Channel, California.

At the 2012 Catalina Channel Swimming Federation banquet, Dr. Penny Lee Dean talked about a number of luminaries from the Catalina Channel history.

Daisy Murchie was one of the early pioneers of ocean swimming in Southern California.

"She swam from Avalon to Long Beach [an approximate distance of 49 km compared to the traditional shortest straight-line distance of 32.2 km] in 17 hours 4 minutes in 1955. At the age of 39, she became the third woman to cross the Catalina Channel [after Myrtle Huddleston in 1927 and Florence Chadwick in 1952]. She also swam across the Salton Sea a few times as promotion for a neighboring city. She swam around Atlantic City with Tom Parks and worked out in Alamitos Bay with Greta Andersen in addition to starting the Seal Beach Rough Water Swim in 1954 with Amy Hiland and Mary Ann Ward."

Dr. Dean introduced Tom Clardy who became, in 1982, the first amputee to cross the Catalina Channel. Clardy lost his leg as a police officer when he was hit by a car. Clardy recalls, "Swimming made me feel better. I got hit hard physically as a Navy SEAL in Vietnam and then again as a police officer. It was then when I lost my leg. Swimming saved me. The more I move, the better I feel. The less I move, the worse I feel. So swimming is great for me."

Not only was Clardy an amputee, but his other leg was paralyzed, his back was injured, and experienced memory problems due to brain damage. The physicians who treated him decided he was incapable of making his own decisions. But his grit enabled him to gradually to overcome constant pain and achieve post-accident success.

He began his recovery by swimming around a pier in San Diego, California. Then he entered a 10-mile swim and in 1982 he crossed the Catalina Channel in 14 hours 2 minutes after losing his leg 8 years earlier.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, July 13, 2018

André Wiersig Completes 5th Oceans Seven Channel



Courtesy of André Wiersig in the Tsugaru Channel, Japan.

André Wiersig completed his fifth Oceans Seven channel with a successful 12 hour 55 minute crossing of the Tsugaru Channel in northern Japan.

The German swimmer described his crossing from Honshu to Hokkaido, "The swim was super tough, but I’m so happy and pleased that I made it and could stand all the challenges that day. I am exploring this beautiful country and meeting these lovely people. Everybody is so friendly and trustworthy. Everything is so nice and clean here."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Since Jacques Tuset's Last Escapes Around The World


Courtesy of Ned Denison, Jean-Yves Faure and Jacques Tuset escorted by Jean-Christophe Grand swimming from the Fort Royal de Sainte-Marguerite to Palm Beach in Cannes, France.

Since Jacques Tuset of France completed his 29th career prison island swim in San Francisco Bay, California on June 7th from Angel Island to Kirby Cove under the Golden Gate Bridge, he has continued his global escapes at an unprecedented clip.

After his 10 km escape from Angel Island, he returned to a prison by swimming 6 km from the Golden Gate Bridge to Alcatraz Island on June 10th and from Alcatraz to Aquatic Park on June 11th.

Then on June 24th, he escaped for the 9th time from Le Château d’If to Marseille, France (5.5 km). On July 7th, he pioneered a new 15 km prison island swim in France. He started from Le Palais at Belle Île where there was a prison for children and swam 4 hours 23 minutes 39 seconds to Quiberon on the French mainland.

Tuset, an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, explains his next planned swims, "On July 22nd, I will attempt a swim from the island of Chausey that housed more than 300 prisoners during World War I to Granville in France, a 17 km swim escape.

On August 7th, I will attempt a difficult swim where the biggest tidal current exists in Europe. In French, we call it Raz Blanchard; in English, we say The Alderney Race that is 17 km between Alderney Island and France. On Alderney, there were many prison camps that were built and operated by Nazi Germany during its World War II occupation of the Channel Islands. I will not describe this crossing as an escape because bad memories remain for the local people. I will do it as a charity swim for eye illness fundraising. We call it Race for Sight.

Then on August 14th or 16th, I will attempt a 10 km swim in Lake Geneva from Château de Chillon in Switzerland. It is an island castle that was the residence for the Bernese bailiff until Chillon was converted into a state prison in 1733.

For me, these prison island swim challenges give me the opportunity to create and realize beautiful human and cultural heritage meetings. At each new swimming escape, people propose me to new challenges around the world.

Of course, I also hope for the day I can swim from Hashima Island in Japan.
"

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Cork Caps Crazy Workouts For Crowners

Courtesy of Ned Denison, Cork, Ireland.

Another Cork Distance Week is in the books.

The most challenging, most difficult, longest marathon and channel and cold water swimming preparation camp designed by International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame Honor Administrator Ned Denison saw dozens of accomplished and aspiring swimmers push themselves to their limits in Sandycove Island, Cork, Ireland.

High mileage and significant psychological stress over 8 days, concluding with the Body Brain Confusion Swim, were the treats handed out by Denison to help the swimmers achieve their various marathon swimming and channel swimming goals.

The camp also honored the Triple Crowners among its campers for those to have achieved the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming.

Jim Shallow, Carol Cashell (Triple Crowner), Victoria Fox, Johny Lazarenco Tiron (Triple Crowner), Hendrik Meerman (Triple Crowner), Roisin Kelly, Ash Carroll, Sue Croft, Lisa Cummins, Vanessa Daws, Ned Denison (Triple Crowner), Fergus Galvin, Adrian Healy, Heather Purcell, Finbarr Hedderman, Rachel Hill, Alex Jeffers, Thelma Jones, Deirdre King, Imelda Lynch, Lynne MacGregor, Fergal Madden, Attila Manyoki, Garry McCarthy, Cormac McKenna, David Merriman, Jane Mitchell, Nicola Naunton, Barry O'Connor, Kyra Sterre Wijnker, Sue Cook, Fionnuala Walsh (Triple Crowner), Scott Zornig, Bronwyn Jeffers, Roisin Lewis, Maureen Montgomery, Liz Fry (Triple Crowner), Jenny Smith (Triple Crowner), Robin Rose (Triple Crowner), Sam Bail, Colm & Maria Breathnach, Neil Brinkworth, Audrey Burkley, Ciarin & Margaret Bryne, Lucas Carbonaro, Patrick Corkery, Kevin Dennehy, Catherine Fravalo, Ian Grimmer, Martin Hayes, Stephanie Hopson, Lynn Kubasek, Karianne Lancee, Jim Loreto, Liam Maher, Janet Manning, Daniel Martinez Lobo (Triple Crowner), Patrick McKnight (Triple Crowner), Courtney Moates Paulk (Triple Crowner), Therese Molyneux, Craig Morrison, Dave & Bridget Mulcahy, Anna Maria Mullally, Owen O'Keefe, Eoin O'Riordan, Riana Parsons, Siobhan Russell, Mark Smitherman (Triple Crowner), Crispin Thorold, Sarah Tunnicliffe, Ignacio Vaccaro, Clare Watkins, Martha Wood, Paula Yankauskas, Josh Brinkmann, Kristian O'Donovan, Matthais Kaßner (Triple Crowner), Adam Abrams, Gordon Adair, Jason Betly, Robert Bohane, and Caitriona Kehily.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Freestyling For Four

Courtesy of WOWSA, Santa Catalina Channel, Southern California.

Toni Enderli is going for his fourth Oceans Seven channel on a late night next week. Follow him on his Catalina Channel crossing starting at 11:30 pm Los Angeles time on Monday, July 16th here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Raves For Race For The Conch

Courtesy of Brilliant Studios and Ben Stubenberg, Grace Bay, Turks & Caicos.

Flat clear turquoise water on Grace Bay made for perfect conditions at the 9th annual Turks & Caicos “Race for the Conch” Eco-SeaSwim. More than 100 swimmers turned out for the international open water swim competition in front of Rickie’s Flamingo Cafe that saw both top competitors battle it out for a trophy and regular swimmers taking on a personal challenge to swim 2.4 miles, 1 mile, or 1/2 mile distances.

Local swimmer Dan Redmond took first place overall in the 1-mile race in 21 minutes 40 seconds, holding off two visiting Americans Clay Britt from the US took second, while Kevin Donlon.

Redmond has an impressive streak at the Race for the Conch: he won the 1-mile in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2018, finishing second in 2015 and 2017.

Michelle Patton was the fastest women in the 1-mile race in 22 minutes 59 seconds, followed by two fellow Americans Susan Ingraham and Megan Kruth.

Kruth presents a heartwarming comeback story. The schoolteacher and Ironman triathlete was a 17-time All-American collegiate swimmer from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania who suffered a traumatic brain injuries in a bike accident that left her in a coma. After three years of rehabilitation, she learned how to swallow, talk, and walk again. She entered the 2017 Race for the Conch Eco-SeaSwim for her first athletic event after her injury and finished on the podium this year with her whole family cheering on with other swim friends.

In the 2.4-mile race, Eney Jones was first overall in 53 minutes 34 seconds. Kruth and Ingraham did double-duty and finishing second and third, respectively. Jones hosted on three popular swim clinics the day before the race in front of Rickie’s Flamingo Cafe, including one for young swimmers to improve their technique and training.

Donlon won the men's 2.4-mile race, also finishing in 53 minutes 34 seconds, holding off Wally Dicks in second and Craig Franz in third.

Jack Parlee defending his 0.5-mile overall title with a 12 minute 46 second victory over Gregory Ewing and Pascal Desaulnay. Ella O’Connell came in first in 15 minutes 19 seconds followed by her sister Olivia O’Connell in second and Sara Lark in third.

16 local kids 10 years and under participated in the 100m Children's Swim with 9-year-old Lenin Hamilton and 10-year-old Tajhari Williams also swimming the 1-mile race as well.

Co-Race Director Ben Stubenberg stated, “Everything went off without a hitch thanks to dedicated volunteers and committed sponsors who demonstrated once again that TCI runs some of the best open water swim races anywhere on the planet.”

Co-Race Director Chloe Zimmermann added, “It is particularly gratifying to see swimmers return year after year — some 9 years on a row, as well as the very encouraging increase in the number of Turks & Caicos Islands swimmers thanks to expansion of swim clubs and learn-to-swim programs.”

Race proceeds primarily go towards the Provo Children’s Home. For more information on the race, visit here.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Old Friends, All Rivals, Marathon Heroes

Courtesy of Jean-François Roussy, World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation.

During the summers of 1991 and 1992, a group of close friends from Germany, Australia, USA, Canada, Japan, Italy, and Argentina traveled the world to compete in professional marathon swims in Canada, Argentina, Italy and elsewhere.

provided a photo of the group: Christof Wandratsch, David O’Brien, James Kegley, Jean-François Roussy, Yuko Matsuzaki, Sergio Chiarandini, Diego Degano, Irene van der Laan, and Gisèle Roy.

In the following two races alone, the quality of the field is shown by the number of Honor Swimmers inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame who competed in the 36 km Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli: David O’Brien, Diego Degano, Attila Molnar, David Alleva, Claudio Plit, Christof Wandratsch, Gustavo Oriozabala, Shelley Taylor-Smith, James Kegley, Susie Maroney, Silvia Dalotto, Irene van der Laan, Maria Luisa Cabañeros Sanchez de Leon, Igor de Souza, Alison Streeter, Chris Stockdale, Yuko Matsuzaki, Attila Molnar, Paul Asmuth, and Marian Cassidy.

36th Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli (July 6th 1991) Results:
1 David O’Brien (Australia) 6 hours 48 minutes 55 seconds
2 Sergio Chiarandini (Italy) 6 hours 53 minutes 33 seconds
3 Diego Degano (Argentina) 6 hours 54 minutes 36 seconds
4 Attila Molnar (Hungary) 6 hours 57 minutes 20 seconds
5 Fernando Fleitas (Argentina) 7 hours 6 minutes 42 seconds
6 David Alleva (USA) 7 hours 12 minutes 27 seconds
7 Andreas Balwe (Germany) 7 hours 13 minutes 13 seconds
8 Claudio Plit (Argentina) 7 hours 15 minutes 42 seconds
9 Christof Wandratsch (Germany) 7 hours 16 minutes 31 seconds
10 Gustavo Oriozabala (Argentina) 7 hours 16 minutes 39 seconds
11 Shelley Taylor-Smith (Australia) 7 hours 19 minutes 21 seconds [1st women]
12 Dusan Toth Szabo (Hungary) 7 hours 20 minutes 23 seconds
13 Dragan Kurgic (Yugoslavia) 7 hours 21 minutes 27 seconds
14 Firas Muala (Syria) 7 hours 24 minutes 42 seconds
15 Alexander Gaidukevitch (USSR) 7 hours 25 minutes 15 seconds
16 James Kegley (USA) 7 hours 31 minutes 43 seconds
17 Rosario Castellano (Italy) 7 hours 36 minutes 41 seconds
18 Richard Kamas (Czechoslovakia) 7 hours 40 minutes 17 seconds
19 Rita Kovacs (Hungary) 7 hours 43 minutes 41 seconds [2nd women]
20 Tammy van Wisse (Australia) 7 hours 48 minutes 57 seconds [3rd women]
21 Peter Galvin (Australia) 7 hours 49 minutes 21 seconds
22 Michael Sanda (Czechoslovakia) 7 hours 50 minutes 20 seconds
23 Susie Maroney (Australia) 7 hours 50 minutes 47 seconds [4th women]
24 Mohamed Ali Yassen (Egypt) 7 hours 52 minutes 3 seconds
25 Lenka Pakakova (Czechoslovakia) 8 hours 11 minutes 27 seconds [5th women]
26 Jana Slaba (Czechoslovakia) 8 hours 16 minutes 27 seconds [6th women]
27 Silvia Dalotto (Argentina) 8 hours 22 minutes 37 seconds [7th women]
28 Irene van der Laan (Netherlands) 8 hours 33 minutes 13 seconds [8th women]
29 Anita Sood (India) 8 hours 36 minutes 15 seconds [9th women]
30 Diana Simonovic (Yugoslavia) 8 hours 41 minutes 4 seconds [10th women]
31 Gizella Szlavitsek (Hungary) 8 hours 44 minutes 1 second [11th women]
32 Christiane Fanzeres (Brazil) 8 hours 51 minutes 45 seconds [12th women]
33 Ayman Saad (Egypt) 9 hours 0 minutes 6 seconds
34 Maria Luisa Cabañeros Sanchez de Leon (Spain) 9 hours 1 minute 53 seconds [13th women]
35 Igor de Souza (Brazil) 9 hours 2 minutes 28 seconds
36 Alison Streeter (England 9 hours 37 minutes 22 seconds [14th women]
37 Khaida Muala (Syria) 9 hours 43 minutes 30 seconds [15th women]
DNF K. Augusta (Antille)
DNF K. Cratsz (Antille)
DNF A. Hussein (Syria)
DNF D. Haruk (USSR)
DNF P. Mayer (Switzerland)
DNF Rob Schmidt (USA)
DNF Chris Stockdale (England)
DNF Z. Dineva (Bulgaria)
DNF M. El Tawil (Egypt)
DNF Yuko Matsuzaki (Japan)

37th Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli (July 5th 1992) Results:
1 Diego Degano (Argentina) 6 hours 38 minutes 35 seconds
2 Christof Wandratsch (Germany) 6 hours 40 minutes 7 seconds
3 Hans van Goor (Netherlands) 6 hours 40 minutes 57 seconds
4 David O’Brien (Australia) 6 hours 42 minutes 15 seconds
5 Fernando Fleitas (Argentina) 6 hours 44 minutes 49 seconds
6 David Alleva (USA) 6 hours 46 minutes 11 seconds
7 Attila Molnar (Hungary) 6 hours 48 minutes 10 seconds
8 Gustavo Oriozabala (Argentina) 6 hours 48 minutes 47 seconds
9 Ahmad Hussein (Syria) 6 hours 56 minutes 47 seconds
10 Paul Asmuth (USA) 6 hours 59 minutes 15 seconds
11 Dusan Toth Szabo (Hungary) 7 hours 1 minute 55 seconds
12 Fernando Terrilli (Argentina) 7 hours 4 minutes 32 seconds
13 Firas Muala (Syria) 7 hours 6 minutes 20 seconds
14 Andreas Balwe (Germany) 7 hours 8 minutes 30 seconds
15 Claudio Plit (Argentina) 7 hours 8 minutes 51 seconds
16 Richard Kamas (Czechoslovakia) 7 hours 10 minutes 19 seconds
17 Marian Cassidy (USA) 7 hours 11 minutes 10 [1st women]
18 James Kegley (USA) 7 hours 18 minutes 11 seconds
19 Rita Kovacs (Hungary) 7 hours 25 minutes 19 [2nd women]
20 Michael Sanda (Czechoslovakia) 7 hours 27 minutes 22 seconds
21 Silvia Dalotto (Argentina) 7 hours 30 minutes 9 [3rd women]
22 Eva Berlanovits (Hungary) 7 hours 32 minutes 31 [4th women]
23 Rick Heltzel (USA) 7 hours 34 minutes 48 seconds
24 Gisèle Roy (Canada) 7 hours 37 minutes 58 [5th women]
25 Diana Simonovic (Croatia) 7 hours 42 minutes 8 [6th women]
26 Anita Sood (India) 7 hours 42 minutes 41 [7th women]
27 Gizella Szlavitsek (Hungary) 7 hours 43 minutes 7 [8th women]
28 Mohamed ali Yassen (Egypt) 7 hours 44 minutes 44 seconds
29 Ana Maria Vidal (Brazil) 7 hours 45 minutes 42 [9th women]
30 Lenka Pakankova (Czechoslovakia) 7 hours 46 minutes 49 [10th women]
31 Igor de Souza (Brazil) 7 hours 50 minutes 32 seconds
32 Susie Maroney (Australia) 7 hours 59 minutes 30 [11th women]
33 Ahmad Saad (Egypt) 8 hours 4 minutes 26 seconds
34 Irene van der Laan (Netherlands) 8 hours 6 minutes 43 [12th women]
35 Jana Slaba (Czechoslovakia) 8 hours 9 minutes 7 [13th women]
36 Christiane Fanzeres (Brazil) 8 hours 24 minutes 40 [14th women]
37 Maria Luisa Cabañeros Sanchez de Leon (Spain) 8 hours 45 minutes 23 [15th women]
38 Yuko Matsuzaki (Japan) 8 hours 46 minutes 17 [16th women]
39 Khaida Muala (Syria) 9 hours 34 minutes 2 [17th women]
DNF P. Abramowicz (Poland)
DNF Sergio Chiarandini (Italy)
DNF P. Galvin (Australia)
DNF D. Haruk (Belarus)
DNF P. Szmyth (Poland)
DNF W. Szmyth (Poland)
DNF Z. Dineva (Bulgaria)

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

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Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program