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Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Shirley Babashoff Honored In California

Courtesy of State Senator John Moorlach, State Senator Janet Nguyen, California.

While Katie Ledecky wowed the Olympic audiences with her 4 gold, 1 silver medal performance at the Rio Olympics and demonstrated her range of prowess from the 200m freestyle to the 800m freestyle, her stellar performances reminded us of the 1968 exploits of Debbie Meyer and the 1976 swims of Shirley Babashoff.

Yesterday in Sacramento, California Senators Moorlach and Nguyen honored Huntington Beach native and Olympic medalist Babashoff with a state resolution to highlight her community involvement and her many accomplishments at the Olympics and beyond.

"During the 1976 Olympics, Ms. Babashoff led [the American swim] team and was vilified for exposing the East German’s steroid use which would be confirmed years later in documents from the East German secret police.

Ranked among the greatest swimming feats of all time, Ms. Babashoff's greatest Olympic performance occurred during the 1976 [USA] Olympic Trials, where she won every freestyle event and the 400-meter individual medley, broke the world record for the 800-meter freestyle, and set six U.S. records, including three events in the heats and three in the finals. Today, she lives and works in Orange County, California, where she serves the community with the same bright spirit she displayed while competing in the Olympics
."

"Shirley Babashoff has been a source of great joy and pride to the people of California," said Senator Moorlach. "I am so proud to honor an Olympic athlete of her caliber. Shirley possessed the skill and determination to succeed in the Olympics and now displays the same spirit as she serves her community."

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Memories Etched Into History

Images courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic triathlon in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

The volunteers on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro will never forgot the honor and the joy of helping, kayaking, observing and overseeing the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

NOWSA Honors Marilyn Bell Di Lascio

Courtesy of Northwest Open Water Swimming Association, Washington.

The Northwest Open Water Swimming Association (NOWSA) is a non-profit corporation in the state of Washington that promotes interest in swimming in Pacific Northwest waters (including the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho).

The swims that NOWSA oversees includes swims across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the Bainbridge Island Circumnavigation, the Bert Thomas Swim, swims in Lake Washington, the Amy Hiland Swim, the Mercer Island Marathon Swim, and the Maury Island Circumnavigation.

Andrew Malinak and his colleagues on the NOWSA Board of Directors (Wendy Van De Sompele, Jerome Leslie, Melissa Nordquist and Scott Lautman) bestowed an Honorary Lifetime Membership upon Marilyn (Bell) Di Lascio who crossed the Strait of Juan de Fuca in 1956 on the day of the 60th anniversary of her crossing as heartfelt gratitude for the inspiration she has given to Pacific Northwest swimming community.

"60 years ago today, an 18-year-old from Toronto, Canada named Marilyn Bell swam across the Strait of Juan de Fuca," posted the Northwest Open Water Swimming Association. "Two weeks prior, Marilyn was pulled from the water part way between Victoria and [her] destination of Port Angeles. She was hypothermic, but living in a world which did not yet have a name for the condition.

She spent the next few days training, and watched Amy Hiland swim into Victoria, becoming the first female to cross the Strait.

On her second attempt, Marilyn knew she needed to do something different. To keep herself motivated, she changed the route. Now aiming for Canada, she'd be swimming home. That's the thought that got her across. Swim home.

Today, the Strait of Juan de Fuca remains an extraordinarily challenging swim, with water temperatures rarely above 50°F (10°C), temperamental weather, and fast currents. The success rate is about 1-in-10. A hard swim then, and a hard swim now
."

Strait of Juan de Fuca Swims between Vancouver Island, Canada and Washington, USA:
*Bert Thomas (USA-Canada) 11 hours 22 minutes on July 8th 1955
*Cliff Lumsdon (Canada-USA) 11 hours 35 minutes on August 17th 1956
*Amy Hiland (USA-Canada) 10 hours 51 minutes on August 18th 1956
*Ben Laughren (USA-Canada) 10 hours 17 minutes on August 18th 1956
*Marilyn Bell (USA-Canada) 10 hours 38 minutes on August 23rd 1956
*Vicki Keith (USA-Canada) 14 hours 1 minute on August 10th 1989 [butterfly]
*Andrew Malinak (Canada-USA) 6 hours 59 minutes on September 6th 2015

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

O' The Adventure Of Swimming Across Scotland

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

A 25-year-old engineer is a thinking man's wild swimmer. He has used his creativity to come up with some cool assisted stage swims.

After completing a 240 km solo stage swim along the River Severn in Great Britain, Ross O'Sullivan is back for more.

O'Sullivan is attempting a Swim Across Scotland, another 110 km stage swim starting on August 27th. "The challenge is simple. I aim to swim across Scotland. You can actually swim from sea to sea from the west to the east coast of Scotland, without ever touching land.

I will attempt to swim within 6 days from Fort William to Inverness [as a charity swim] to aid Children's Hospital in Cardiff.
"

For more information on the Swim Across Scotland, visit here.

Photo above shows O'Sullivan swimming 240 km in 18 days in a solo stage swim along the longest river in Britain, the River Severn from Llanidloes to Newnham, Gloucestershire in June, averaging 18.5 km per day.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Monday, August 22, 2016

Professional Marathon Swimmer Survey By Christine Jennings

Courtesy of Christine Jennings.

American national open water swim team member Christine Jennings is currently gathering data from professional marathon swimmers and coaches for her research paper during her master's degree program.

Jennings posted a survey (here) for professional marathon swimmers to express their opinions on the sport. "I appreciate any feedback you can give me for the improvement of FINA and the sport of open water swimming. It is intended only for research use for my final paper in the MSA Sports Administration and Technology program that I am attending in Switzerland."

The questions on the survey include the following:

1. What year did you start competing on an international level in open water marathon swimming?
2. Where was your first open water race?
3. Do you see the sport of Open Water Swimming growing and improving during this next Olympic cycle (before Tokyo 2020)? Please explain. Why? Why not?
4. What do you want to see change, if any, in the sport this next Olympic cycle? Please explain.
5. What are your feelings towards the development of the sport?
6. Mass Participation Swimming is quickly growing.
7. Competition Swimming is growing worldwide.
8. FINA EVENT: I feel safe competing here as an athlete.
9. I fully understand the risks and potential dangers associated with the sport.
10. Either myself or my federation coach fully understands the safety plan and the implementation of it for this race.
11. I received appropriate and sufficient information about safety protocol prior to an event.
12. I felt that I understood the risks and potential dangers on the course.
13. I felt that I understood the risks and potential dangers of the water.
14. I felt that I understood the risks and potential dangers of the structure of the event.
15. I received appropriate and sufficient information about safety plans and protocols prior to an event.
16. I felt fully able to withdraw from a competition before and during a race.
17. Sufficient changes have been made to mitigate and foresee risks in order to keep myself and other athletes from harm.
18. These changes have been enforced in FINA events.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimmers Light Up Boston With 100% Pass Rate

Courtesy of Elaine Howley, Boston Light Swim.

Are swimmers getting better or are conditions getting easier?

It may be a combination of the two phenomena in Boston Harbor on August 20th. "[We saw] a record 100% completion rate in the notoriously challenging 8-mile Boston Light Swim. The annual event has been staged since 1907 and is dubbed The Granddaddy of American Open Water Swims.

Warmer-than-usual water, a strong flood tide, and a light tailwind combined to produce one of the fastest swims in recent history and an unprecedented 100% completion rate by the field of 24 solo swimmers and 6 relay teams
."

29-year-old Eric Nilsson of Boston cruised to an easy third victory in the event (also winning in 2012 and 2013) in a near-record time of 2:25:17. He just missed the record of 2 hours 20 minutes set by David Alleva in 1995.

47-year-old Erin Bakey Brown of Ventura, California was the first female finisher in a time of 2:49:32, good for fourth place overall.

A 3-person female relay team called Crankin’ for Frank was the fastest relay on Saturday, finishing in a time of 2:53:31. Named in honor of Frank Wuest, a Cambridge Masters Swim Club member who passed away during an open water race in Rhode Island earlier this month, the relay’s team members Kate Radville, Sheryl Bierden, and Amy Whitesides swam in memory of their fallen lanemate.

Race Director Elaine Howley said, "Having every swimmer finish within the strict 5-hour time limit was a real thrill. This is the first time we can remember that every single starter finished the event. That’s a testament both to the strength of the field of swimmers and the impossibly perfect conditions we had on Saturday."

Water temperatures near the lighthouse hovered around 63°F, 5°F warmer than is typical. As the swimmers approached the inner harbor and the finish line at the L Street Bathhouse in South Boston, the water warmed to a balmy 68°F. A light easterly wind and a ripping flood tide pushed swimmers along, creating one of the fastest events in history.

"The Boston Light Swim staff was aided by a dozen dedicated volunteers who donated many hours over the weekend to make the swim happen. A fleet of fantastic boaters from around the area converged to escort swimmers to the finish line, and the Coast Guard and Boston EMS were also on hand to ensure the safety of all participants."

For more information, visit www.bostonlightswim.org.

Results of Solo Finishers:
1. Eric Nilsson 2:25:17
2. Lochie Hinds 2:38:15
3. Bobby Morse 2:46:56
4. Erin Bakey Brown 2:49:32
5. John Shumadine 2:59:43
6. Becky Jackman 3:00:32 [photo above]
7. Cindy Walsh 3:03:30
8. John Cloherty 3:05:08
9. Michael Klonsky 3:08:49
10. Rob Wilson 3:11:20
11. Roger Finch 3:16:39
12. David Connors 3:19:21
13. Todd Estabrook 3:21:44
14. Kim Garbarino 3:23:55
15. Lori Carena 3:31:35
16. Helen Lin 3:41:24
17. Judy Beckman 3:42:08
18. Suzie Dods 3:46:46
19. David Kilroy 4:04:27
20. Jef Mallett 4:18:00
21. Ricky Sweeney 4:20:56
22. Fran O’Loughlin 4:28:55
23. Natalie K. 4:32:46
24. Brian Concannon 4:42:27

Results of Relays:
1. Crankin’ for Frank 2:53:31 (Kate Radville, Sheryl Bierden, Amy Whitesides)
2. SOS 3 Mermaids and a Merman 3:11:48 (Jane Cheney, Rita Hansen, Christine Woolbright, Frank Johnson)
3. Your Pace or Mine? 3:22:21 (Wendy McDanolds, Courtney Paulk)
4. Sachuset Ocean Swimmers 3:22:22 (Paul Talewsky, Kathy Lewis, Zachary Scheetz)
5. The Aquanauts 3:35:10 (Jeffrey Pinnix, James Campbell, Chris Ryan)
6. AARPe Diem 3:47:42 (Cyndi Kimball, Christine Linnane)

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Open Water Swimming Lingo At The Olympics

Images courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

Two California open water swimmers were overheard talking about the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim that was held last week on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

Dude 1: Did you see Jordan Wilimovsky get barnacled at the end of the race?

Dude 2: Totally. But he was right in the middle of the 8-wide, probably getting all dinged up. What did you expect?

Dude 1: He had some room on his left side, but the field suddenly closed in on him. He got totally boxed in and he could not go left or right. The dude was chummed.

Dude 2: You gotta expect the unexpected, especially in a race like that.

Dude 1: And what did you think of Jack Burnell's DQ?

Dude 2: Bogus, man. It was a ghost call, apparently. He was really pissed off.

Dude 1: Do you think so? Could it have been a retaliation call?

Dude 2: Nah. There was no one around him when he got the ghost call. He was in no-man's land from what I heard. How could it be a retaliation call? But you know, who really knows out there?

Dude 1: But at the end of the race, Jack was either punched or ziplined. I forget which, but he said he stopped dead, he just immediately dropped anchor.

Dude 2: I didn't see that, but that impeding probably cost him the race.

Dude 1: Apparently, it did because it was his second infringement. But the rest of the guys are hardened to that physicality.

Dude 2: That old guy from Greece, the lead swimmer really took over. He looked like an electrocuted crab down the finish chute at the end of the race. His stroke rate was out of control.

Dude 1: Spyridon Gianniotis? He is a stud. 36 years old and turning on the jets like that? Incredible.

Dude 2: Yeah, our coach saw that and just said, "No Pain, No Gain. No Guts, No Glory. No Risk, No Reward. No Lanes, No Lines, No Mercy."

Dude 1: He really separated himself from that scrum among the lead pack. He took negative splitting to the extreme. He didn't stick and stay like the other guys who were getting shmangled in the lead pack.

Dude 2: Yeah, there is no way you will be red-carded being so far ahead. But Spyros did seem to be able to shoot the gap really well. He had no need for suijutsu.

Dude 1: And what did you think of that Aussie Jarrod Poort? He shot out of there like a rabbit. But he knew what he was doing.

Dude 2: He certainly knew the risks. Jarrod is no Barney or Howie.

Dude 1: Yup, ain't no nipper, but he got worked when the trailing pack caught him and passed him by.

Dude 2: Anyway, the race had everything and the guys gave it all they had. The women's race was just as gnarly too.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

No Man's Land In The Open Water

Image courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic triathlon in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

No man's land is a term adapted from the military. In open water swimming, no man's land is an area between packs of swimmers in an open water swimming event.

For a competitive swimmer to be in a position between packs in no man's land swimming solo, it is difficult because the swimmer cannot draft off of the faster pack and is at a disadvantage vis-a-vis the slower pack. Or they have to make a choice between swimming to the left, right or staying right in the middle [see above photo from Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Natación De Invierno. Winter Swimming At End Of The World

Courtesy of Matías Ola, Swim Argentina.

For information on winter swimming events, extreme swims, and marathon swimming expeditions organized by Matías Ola with Swim Argentina, contact him in Buenos Aires at Reservas@Swimargentina.Org.

The various Swim Argentina's events throughout Ola's native country include:

*Swimming Across Río de la Plata from Uruguay to Argentina [or Cruce a Nado Río de la Plata Uruguay Argentina in Spanish]

Ola explains, "Crossing the Río de la Plata is one of the most difficult challenges of open water in the world. It is the widest river in the world and separates Argentina from Uruguay River.

It is a journey for swimmers with experience in long distances. As in many other channels and straits in the world, the Río de la Plata maintains a large flow of commercial maritime vessels. It is a journey that can be compared to the English Channel between England and France and the Catalina Channel between California and Santa Catalina Island
."

*Swim in front of the Perito Moreno Glacier National Park [or Nado Frente al Glaciar Perito Moreno Parque Nacional Los Glaciares in Spanish]

Ola describes, "It is an opportunity to swim close to the largest glacier on earth, the Eighth Wonder of the World. Swim Argentina offers the experience of knowing the most-visited tourist destination of Argentina: El Calafate in Patagonia. Learn about the glacier in a unique way, swim alone, or swim in a group to experience extreme open water swimming."

*Swim across the Beagle Channel [or Cruce a Nado del Canal Beagle Argentina-Chile in Spanish]

Ola explains, "The Beagle Channel is a strait sea passage located at the southern tip of South America. It leading to the starting point of this crossing to Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego in Argentina, known as the End of the World.

The channel forms the international border between Argentina and Chile. The average width of the Beagle Channel is a little more than 2 nautical miles. It has two maximum narrows: in the east the Mackinlay passage of 1.5 km and the western tip divide the area where it is only 750 meters wide
."

*Swim Camp Laguna del Inca Argentina-Chile [or Swimming Camp Laguna del Inca Argentina-Chile in Spanish]

Ola describes, "Laguna del Inca is the name given to a lagoon at 3,000 meters above sea level in the Andes Portillo area, located in the province of Los Andes, Region of Valparaiso, Chile.

According to an Inca legend, in this lagoon Illi Yupanqui cried when the Inca princess Kora-lle died in an accident while she was fulfilling a tradition for marriage. There was left the body of the princess. It is said that at that time the lagoon turned emerald, tinted of the color of the eyes that the son of the Sun could no longer wake up. It is also said that in certain winter nights you can still hear the cries of the Inca
."

*Destination 3 Glacier [or Experiencia 3 Glaciares Argentinos in Spanish]

Ola explains, "Upsala Glacier, along with the Perito Moreno Glacier, Glacier is the most visited location in the region where big drifting icebergs that detached from the front of the glacier are pushed by the wind along the North Arm and after Lake Argentino, to anchor at the eastern end of this, where wind, sun and rain melt them."



Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Congratulations Rio. Top Moments In The Olympic 10K

Images courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic triathlon in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

After hearing for months on end in the American press, repeatedly and critically about how the 2016 Rio Olympic Games were going to fail with all kinds of problems from the Zika virus to the dangerous waters of Copacabana, the Games ended successfully and were spectacularly a celebration of athletic performances by individuals of every size and sport, age and background.

From the sweep of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim by the Dutch swimmers Sharon Van Rouwendaal and Ferry Weertman to the physicality shown by runners on the track and open water swimmers on Copacabana Beach, we very much enjoyed the close races and the dominating performances.

Our top 10 moments in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim were as follows:

10. The tears of joy and the tears of disappointment; the broad smiles and the genuine hugs of the athletes after the men's and woman's races were completed.

9. The bold, exciting, but ultimately unsuccessful strategy of Jarrod Poort. The 21-year-old from Australia shot out to the lead and tried to steal the race with an unusual strategy.

8. The NBC televised and online production from a helicopter, in-the-water cameras, onshore cameras and offshore cameras on the 10 km marathon course that enabled viewers to see a combination of panoramic and close-up views of the athletes. The camerawork was outstanding as it allows millions of viewers around the world to understand the constantly changing leaders and constantly dynamic lead and trailing packs.

7. The local organizers who had to reconstruct the 10 km marathon course in less than 48 hours in light of the large surf and weather conditions that wiped out the course.

6. The outspoken complaints by Jack Burnell. The 23-year-old from Great Britain was not timid in his public criticism of his rivals and the officiating on the race course with the hopes that positive changes will be made by FINA.

5. The officiating of John West in the women's race. The New Zealand representative on the FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee had to make a judgment at the very end of the race that changed the medalists on the podium.

4. The final straight-line finish by Rachele Bruni. The 25-year-old from Italy held her position despite swimming stroke-for-stroke with Aurélie Muller to capture a silver.

3. The gold medal performance by Ferry Weertman. The 24-year-old from the Netherlands timed the perfect finish to seal a dramatic 8-wide sprint.

2. The gold medal performance by Sharon Van Rouwendaal. The 22-year-old from the Netherlands took control of the race at the feeding station and was committed to sprinting 3 km to victory.

1. The silver medal performance by Spyridon Gianniotis. The 36-year-old from Greece swam arguably the best race of his life and climaxed his career of five Olympic Games with a dramatic silver medal swim.

Congratulations, Brazil. Great job, Rio de Janeiro. You hosted an outstanding celebration for the athletes.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival is accepting submissions for its 14th annual film festival in March 2017 at Cowell Theater in Fort Mason Center, San Francisco.

Films from all over the world - from India to Germany, from Argentina to Taiwan - inspire audiences to discover the beauty and mysteries of the ocean, its marine life, ecosystems, coastal cultures and much more.

The Festival accepts films of all genres and on a variety of ocean-related subjects including environmental ocean issues, ocean conservation, ocean sports and exploration, coastal cultures, marine life, and marine ecosystems.

Films can be submitted via FilmFreeway or Withoutabox at www.oceanfilmfest.org.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Stars At The Sri Chinmoy Marathon Swim

Courtesy of Vasanti Niemz, Lake Zürich, Switzerland.

18 swimmers and teams had their own boat or kayak in the 29th annual Sri Chinmoy Marathon Swim, a 26 km marathon swim from Rapperswil to Zürich across Lake Zürich on August 7th. "This is how you can always get a guaranteed entry for this highly coveted event with limited space," said Vasanti Niemz. "Bring your own boat and helpers."

Only once in 29 years did the weather not cooperate for the 26 km Sri Chinmoy Marathon Swim Rapperswil-Zurich. This time again, Friday showed heavy showers and thunderstorm, but come Saturday, the weather settled and the quaint little Swiss town of Rapperswil at the eastern end of Lake Zürich welcomed 47 solo and 48 relay swimmers from all over the world - representing 12 nationalities - with one common goal: To swim 26 km and reach Zurich within the official cutoff of 12 hours.

The start had excellent conditions. It was calm tranquility across the lake that changed into a little bit of headwind in the afternoon, including more waves from motor boats and ferries on the lake. The water was a comfortable 22-23°C under sunny skies. Eight solo swimmers and 1 team either gave up or did not make the cut-off time at the halfway point in Meilen or in Zürich.

First to finish was the duo team Rahel und Roger with Roger Bommer and Rahel Küng in 6 hours 31 minutes. Only four minutes later the first solo swimmer, Swiss Till Mesmer, reached the finish in 6 hours 35 minutes, faster than the first neoprene swimmer.

Steffen Hartig from Germany broke the masters wetsuit record with a time of 6 hours 43 minutes to break the men's main category held by Luis José Gilarranz Dominguez from Spain. Hartig, a masters swimmer, was faster than the main category - which happens frequently.

Fastest woman soloist bioprene and overall was Georgina Kovacs from Australia in 6 hours 59 minutes. Second in the overall women's division was American Anna DeLozier who broke Barbara Held's record in the masters woman bioprene category in 7 hours 39 minutes.

"The swimmers' faces at the finish were beaming as usual and the rich vegetarian buffet from tofu to pancakes and great desserts loved by all," said Niemz.

"The lake marathon swim came into existence when Prafulla Nocker who now lives in Austria was a prospective English Channel swimmer from the Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team. She did not make it across the English Channel in 1986. Prafulla missed the tide and would have had to swim at least six more hours. She felt fine and wanted to continue, but the boat pilot ordered her out.

In those days, pilots probably were not used to 24-27 hour swims. To make up for her failure, Prafulla then went on to swim the Lake Zürich one way, and arriving in Rapperswil at night and still not out of power, decided to turn round and swim back. The next year she not only successfully swam the English Channel, but also organised the first Lake Zürich marathon swim for the public
."

Results of Men 16-49 years (Record: 1993 Maarouf Mohamed 5:51:41)
1 Till Mesmer Till (Switzerland) 6:35:35
2 Paul Humenik (USA) 6:55:13
3 Andy Müller (Australia) 7:38:32
4 Sean Deschamps (Australia) 8:41:07
5 Brian Fergusson (Australia) 8:49:59
6 Silvan Hafner (Switzerland) 8:53:47
7 Christopher Jordinson (Great Britain) 9:13:07
8 Steve Brearey (Great Britain) 9:22:53
9 Dirk Dehmer (Germany) 10:06:58
10 Robert Howlett (Great Britain) 10:17:04
11 Daniel Lobo (Spain) 10:21:38
DNF Thomas Pesch (Germany) 24 km
DNF Kevin Dennehy (Ireland) 20 km
DNF Ross Wisby (Great Britain)
DNF Marcus Fell (Germany)

Results of Women 16-49 years (Record: 2001 Krüger Nadja 5:59:43)
1 Georgina Kovacs (Australia) 6:59:31
2 Lynne Macgregor (Switzerland) 9:08:22
3 Sandra O'Connor (Ireland) 9:34:20
4 Geraldine Treacher (Great Britain) 9:50:37
5 Sara Marley (USA/Ireland) 10:18:16
DNF Sarah Tunnicliffe (Great Britain) 20.5 km
DNF Tatiana Kvasova (Russia)

Results of Men over 50 years (Record: 2008 Ned Denison 7:36:13)
1 Paschal Phelan (Ireland) 8:30:51
2 Scott Rodger (Great Britain) 8:44:50
3 Jürg Ammann (Switzerland) 9:17:07
4 Adrian Russell (Great Britain) 10:46:59

Results of Women over 50 years (Record: 2013 Barbara Held Barbara 8:10:50)
1 Anna DeLozier (USA) 7:39:59
2 Kate Robarts (Great Britain) 11:45:17

Results of Men with wetsuit ages 16 to 49 years (Record: 2009 Roland Denzler 6:20:00)
1 Luis José Gilarranz Dominguez (Spain) 6:59:39
2 Sebastian Gisbert (Germany) 7:47:43
3 Martin Keller (Switzerland) 8:17:58
4 Uzi Teshuva (Israel) 8:33:11
5 Jürgen Feuersenger (Germany) 9:05:53
6 Marc White (Switzerland) 9:34:50
7 Matthias Schmidlin (Germany) 9:42:17
8 Pataka Spacek (Czech Republic) 10:21:07
DNF Falko Toetzke (Germany)

Results of Women with wetsuit ages 16 to 49 years (Record: 2011 Sigloch Anja 6:56:57)
1 Conny Prasser (Germany) 8:35:27

Results of Men over 50 years with wetsuit (Record: 2010 Barry Adams 7:20:27)
1 Steffen Hartig (Germany) 6:43:22
2 Dan Silberstein (Israel) 9:11:51
3 Shlomo Amitai (Israel) 9:13:07
4 Christoph Schlegel (Germany) 9:19:12
5 Bruno Stutz (Switzerland) 9:30:51
6 Thilo Klein (Germany) 9:35:00
7 Johan Van Steen (Netherland) 11:03m:07
8 Steve Berger (Great Britain) 11:35:03
DNF Marek Tarnowski (Poland) 19.5 km

Results of Relay Teams without wetsuits (Record: 1996 A. Wilde / Th. Stolz / P. Büchse 5:21:39)
1 Where's Waldo Team 6:49:11 (Chris Waldhart, Jonathan Haines, Shaun Jessop)
2 Perth City Fast Laydeez 9:08:49 (Jackie Gardiner, Katy Welch, Maelle Bourdais)
3 Birch Team 9:36:03 (Claire Birch, Luke Birch, Jamie McAlpine-Leny)
4 Brownies Team 10:06:50 (Katharina Braun, Gian Braun)
5 Sri Chinmoy Marathon Team 10:42:47 (Kallol Linke, Harkara Urmoneit, Sukinkar Pötzsch)
6 Fratelli Team 10:58:07 (Martin Priego Wood, Gary Carter)
DNF Siracusas (Judith O'Driscoll, Elisabeth Davey)

Results of Relay Teams with wetsuit (Record: 2005 K.Kulik / S. Keller / C. Rothböck 5:55:16)
1 Rahel und Roger 6:31:07 (Roger Bommer, Rahel Küng)
2 Team Tempus Capital 6:52:09 (Martin Herrmann, Marco Moser)
3 Swim TEAM Siggingen 7:28:40 (Mike Leoni, Ursula Müller, Thierry Hafner)
4 Flippers bliss 8:15:51 (Christoph Achermann, Sabine Konrad)
5 KSV Coaches 8:25:39 (Caroline Von Allmen, Fabienne Christen, Pascale Rebsamen)
6 Triathlon Club Zürich 8:49:35 (Marc Spieler, Lea Amalo)
7 Twins Triathlon Team 9:17:57 (Peter Lüdicke, Jürgen Lüdicke)
8 Trinations 9:21:20 (Simon Frei, Nicolas Berlinger, Tillmann Schulze)
9 TRIZO 9:44:43 (Enrico Graf, Yvonne Graf, Michael Schlunegger)
10 Peak Performance 9:53:27 (Penny Marshall, Kirsty Staunton, Eamon Staunton)
11 FISH 9:56:56 (Birgit Spitznagel, Markus Stöcklin)

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Trio Of Aussies Do Triple Crown Around The Big Apple

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Australians from Sydney nearly swept the second edition of the Manhattan 20 Bridges Swim around Manhattan Island with a #1, #2 and #4 finish yesterday.

Each of them also completed the last leg of the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming.

Michael Hanisch won in 7 hours 35 minutes with his girlfriend Rachael Elkaim closely behind in 7 hours 44 minutes. Along with Dean Summers, they became Australia's 12th, 13th and 14th swimmers to complete the Triple Crown.

Co-race director David Barra said, "It was a great day. There were happy swimmers and incredible support.

And a great timeline modeling from Rondi Davies made it all come together
."

20 Bridges (Pier A Battery Start/Finish) Results:
1 Michael Hanisch 7:35:53 (Sydney, Australia)
2 Rachael Elkaim 7:44:28 (Sydney, Australia)
3 Spencer Schneider 8:05:44 (New York, New York)
4 Dean Summers 8:10:09 (Sydney, Australia)
5 Kenn Lichtenwalter 8:18:08 (New York, New York)

For more information on the event, visit here.

Michael Hanisch, Rachael Elkaim and Dean Summers are shown above together with another Australian Marty Filipowski who completed the inaugural 20 Bridges Swim on August 15th.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Michael Hanisch Follows Long Line Of Aussie Greats

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Michael Hanisch became Australia's 12th swimmer to complete the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming at yesterday's Manhattan 20 Bridges Swim.

Hanisch finished first in the second 20 Bridges swim in 7 hours 35 minutes around Manhattan Island in New York City to become the 133rd Triple Crowner in history.

Co-race director David Barra said, "It was a great day. There were happy swimmers and incredible support. And a great timeline modeling from Rondi Davies made it all come together."

Hanisch shown above training 25 km for his Catalina Channel crossing from Palm Beach to Manly in his native Australia.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Swimming Goggleless In The Olympics

Image courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic triathlon in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

We love the old-school, raw approach to open water swimming of professional triathlete Andrea Hewitt at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games sprint triathlon [shown on the far right at the start above]. She did not use goggles and swam the ocean leg goggleless.

One of the top performers in the ITU Triathlon World Series, the New Zealand representative finished seventh in today's Olympic triathlon.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Pool Swimming Is Like The 100, Open Water Like The 1500

Images courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiroa.

After watching the 2016 Rio Olympics track events, it is clear that pool swimming is like the sprint races (100 + 200 + 400), but open water swimming is like the middle distance races (800 + 1500 + 3000 + 5000).

Both in the middle distance running races and open water swimming, there is plenty of physicality, surges, lead changes, strategy, and a final mad sprint to the finish are all part of the sport.

Pool swimming and sprint running races are beautiful in their own right, but we also love this kind of raw racing in the middle distance track events and the open water.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

FINA Listen To Jack Burnell And His Competitors

Images courtesy of NBCOlympics.com of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.

The frustrations and observation of disqualified British Olympian Jack Burnell of the officiating at the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim were posted here.

We believe it would be useful and justifiably right if the FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee (TOWSC) members would collectively and carefully listen to - and implement - the recommendations and concrete proposals of the world's leading open water swimmers like Burnell and all his male and female colleagues.

We strongly believe it would be extremely useful and beneficial if the national swimming federations that actually participate in the FINA-sanctioned competitions proposed rule changes or new rules to the support the frustrations of both coaches and athletes.

We researched the relationship between the countries of the FINA TOWSC decision-makers and the countries that qualified swimmers to compete in the 10 km marathon swims in the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics.

The FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee include of the following members:

*Ronnie Wong of Hong Kong, Chairman
*Jorge Delgado Panchana of Ecuador, Vice Chairman
*Andrea Prayer of Italy, Honorary Secretary
*Joaquim Pestana Costa of Angola
*David Ngugi of Kenya
*Fernando Terrilli of Argentina
*Tomas Haces German of Cuba
*Sid Cassidy of USA
*Abdulmonem Al Alawi of Oman
*Mubarak Abdulla Al Zahmi of United Arab Emirates
*Jean Paul Narce of France
*Samuel Greetham of Great Britain
*Noam Zwi of Israel
*William Ford of Australia
*John West of New Zealand
*Christiane Fanzeres of Brazil
*Ayman Saad of Egypt
*Jon Hestoy of Faroe Islands
*Dennis Miller of Fiji, FINA Bureau Liaison

How many swimmers from these countries qualified for the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympic 10K Marathon Swims?

Italy: 7 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 2 men in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
USA: 7 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 2 men in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Brazil: 7 (1 man in 2008 + 2 women in 2008 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 2 woman in 2016)
Great Britain: 7 (1 man in 2008 + 2 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
France: 6 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Australia: 6 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Egypt: 4 (1 man in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Argentina: 3 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 woman in 2012)
Ecuador: 3 (1 man in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
New Zealand: 1 (note: 1 man qualified in 2012 + 1 woman qualified in 2016, but New Zealand did not allow them to participate)
Hong Kong: 1 (1 woman in 2012)
Angola: 0
Kenya: 0
Cuba: 0
Oman: 0
United Arab Emirates: 0
Israel: 0 (note: 1 man qualified in 2008, but Israel did not allow him to participate)
Faroe Islands: 0
Fiji: 0

But more importantly, what countries have qualified athletes in the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, but are not represented in TOWSC?

Russia: 8 (2 men in 2008 + 1 man in 2008 + 2 men in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Germany: 7 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 2 men in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
South Africa: 6 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Venezuela: 6 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Greece: 6 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Hungary: 6 1 man in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 2 women in 2016)
Spain: 5 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 woman in 2016)
China: 5 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Netherlands: 4 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Ukraine: 4 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012)
Portugal: 4 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2016)
Czech Republic: 4 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 woman in 2016)
Japan: 4 (1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Canada: 4 (1 man in 2012 + 1 woman in 2012 + 1 man in 2016 + 1 woman in 2016)
Bulgaria: 3 (1 man in 2008 + 1 man in 2012 + 1 man in 2016)
Mexico: 3 (1 man in 2008 + 1 woman in 2008 + 1 woman in 2012)
Belgium: 2 (1 man in 2008 + 1 man in 2012)
Slovenia: 2 (1 woman in 2008 + 1 woman in 2016)
Poland: 2 (1 woman in 2012 + 1 woman in 2016)
Malaysia: 2 (1 woman in 2012 + 1 woman in 2016)
Tunisia: 2 (1 man in 2012 + 1 man in 2016)
Kazakhstan: 2 (1 man in 2012 + 1 man in 2016)
Syria: 1 (1 man in 2008)
Switzerland: 1 (1 woman in 2008)
Sweden: 1 (1 woman in 2008)
Chile: 1 (1 woman in 2008)
Croatia: 1 (1 woman in 2012)
Switzerland: 1 (1 woman in 2012)
Guam: 1 (1 man in 2012)
Slovakia: 1 (1 man in 2016)

So the FINA decision-makers are skewed to countries that do not send representatives to the Olympics - and many times their swimmers do not even participate in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup and FINA Open Water Swimming Grand Prix races.

On the other hand, countries with a rich history of open water swimming and much collective know-how of organizing open water events are not included in the FINA decision-making process. Representatives from countries like Russia, Germany, South Africa, Netherlands, Venezuela, Greece, Hungary, Spain, China and Portugal are not included in helping advance the sport.

Yet representatives from countries like Angola, Kenya, Cuba, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Israel, Faroe Islands, and Fiji are part of the influential rule- and decision-making governing body.

It does not make sense. The system can most definitely be improved.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming Into Seaweed

Courtesy of WOWSA, Santa Monica Beach, California.

Swimming into seaweed while out in the ocean is always surprising to us. We occasionally slam into seaweed, stop suddenly, head immediately raises to check out the situation, and then resume swimming.

Without failure.



Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Technical Tips With Tower 26

Part 3 of a series on Tower 26 ocean swimming workouts is courtesy of WOWSA.

Early morning workouts in Santa Monica Beach can be tough, but the warm-ups, in's and out's to turn buoys, beach runs, sprints back to shore, and pacing work can make athletes grimace and smile.

Coach Gerry Rodrigues of Tower 26, armed with binoculars and a stopwatch, attracts a variety of teenagers and working adults, giving them all kinds of technical tips and racing strategies before, during and after the workouts.



Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Myriad Details Of Ocean Swimming Workouts

Part 2 of a series on Tower 26 ocean swimming workouts is courtesy of WOWSA, California.

Gerry Rodrigues of Tower 26 in Southern California is a coach who pays attention to the myriad details of the sport of open water swimming.

During his early morning workouts on Santa Monica Beach, Coach Rodrigues asks the lifeguards to leave the lights on in their jeeps onshore in order to help guide the swimmers and triathletes back into shore as they train in their rectagular out-and-back course in the ocean.

He also splits the big group of swimmers into smaller groups, separated by swimmers' speed. Each group has 1-2 group leaders and safety captains in yellow swim caps who guide the swimmers in and out of the surf and around the turn buoys. Lifeguards are also on the beach with their lights on in the car while Coach Gerry is constantly on the outlook with binoculars on shore.



It is quite a workout at 6 am in the Pacific Ocean.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program