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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Is It Time For Another Attempt Of The Kaieiewaho Channel?

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Jonathan Ezer (1976), Penny Palfrey (twice in 2010) and Chris Shoup (2017) attempted to cross the 115.8 km Kaieiewaho Channel, a stretch of notoriously turbulent water between the Hawaiian islands of Oahu and Kauai out in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

Whether it was currents, waves or box jellyfish, the channel threw insurmountable obstacles in the face of these swimmers.

All were courageous in their attempts. All were audacious in their dreams. All are adventurous by their actions. Who will be next?

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Blue Mind - Your Brain On Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Hollywood and movie makers around the world often adapt both well-known and relatively unknown books into films.

Dr. Wallace J Nichols is doing the same with his popular book, Blue Mind. He is taking the book Blue Mind and transforming it into Blue Mind The Movie.

Dr. Nichols' book-into-film is an opportunity to share the science of the human brains on water. "Blue Mind is medicine for what ails us: the "red mind" state of fear, stress and distraction.

This groundbreaking film will share the often overlooked cognitive, emotional, physical, social and spiritual benefits of being near, in or around water
," explains the American scientist from California.



"This film adaptation of the Blue Mind book and movement connects the dots between neuroscience and economics as well as water and wellness by focusing on the often overlooked cognitive, emotional, social, physical, and spiritual benefits of being in or around water.

Everyone who wants to embrace their best Blue Mind can pre-purchase the movie or invest in its crowdfunding production on Indiegogo
."

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Representing Australia At World Lifesaving Championships

Courtesy of Australian Life Saving.

Australia’s first volunteer Surf Life Saving clubs began in 1907 in Sydney. Between 1902 and 1905 the laws that prevented swimming in daylight hours since the 1830s were gradually removed in a societal transformation that reflected changing public attitudes.

These changes had a dramatic impact: the number of beachgoers, ocean swimmers, drownings and attempted rescues suddenly increased.

On October 18th 1907, representatives from Sydney Surf Life Saving Clubs, together with members of other interested groups, met to form the Surf Bathing Association of New South Wales, the organisation which is now known as Surf Life Saving Australia.

Supported by the Australian Sports Commission and in partnership with Royal Life Saving Society Australia, the athletes below will represent Australia who will compete in the biennial World Lifesaving Championships and other national team competitions. The Australian Life Saving Team Squad includes the following athletes:

* Sam Bell, Maroochydore
* Matt Bevilacqua, Kurrawa
* Keelan Bridge, Bronte and The Hills
* Josh Brown, Currumbin
* Harriet Brown, BMD Northcliffe
* Alyssa Bull, Alexandra Headland
* Ben Carberry, Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park
* Daniel Collins, Redhead
* Luke Cuff, Mermaid Beach
* Prue Davies, Currumbin and Queensland RLS
* Matt Davis, Currumbin
* Ali Day, Surfers Paradise
* Blake Drysdale, Newport
* Maddy Dunn, BMD Northcliffe
* Rachel Eddy, Kurrawa and Queensland RLS
* Riley Fitzsimmons, Avoca Beach
* Elizabeth Forsyth, Currumbin
* Ethan Garland, North Cronulla and Port Hacking
* Chelsea Gillett, Maroochydore and Brisbane Lifesaving Squad
* Kieran Gordon, Currumbin
* Nikolas Green, BMD Northcliffe
* Ngaire Hadfield, Cronulla
* Pamela Hendry, Maroochydore
* Samantha Howe, Point Leo
* Mariah Jones, Tweed Heads & Coolangatta and Queensland RLS
* Nicole Kay, Kurrawa
* Alyssa Koenan, BMD Northcliffe
* Amy Levings, BMD Northcliffe
* Kendrick Louis, Manly
* Callum Lowe-Griffiths, Kurrawa
* Jake Lynch, Newport
* Bree Masters, Kurrawa
* Jordan Mercer, Noosa Heads
* Georgia Miller, Newport
* Hannah Minogue, Newport
* Tom Montgomery Currumbin
* Thomas Nolan, North Cottesloe
* Matt Poole, Kurrawa
* Tim Schofield Terrigal and The Hills
* Jemma Smith, Umina and The Hills
* Jake Smith, Trigg Island
* Jackson Symonds, Sorrento (WA)
* Mitchell Trim, Newport
* Lizzie Welborn, North Bondi
* Hayden White, Currumbin
* Rachel Wood, Umina and The Hills
* Brad Woodward, Shelly Beach and The Hills

For more information, visit here. Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Stephen The Swimmer


Courtesy of Thomas Beug.

Stephen Redmond, an Irish swimmer and first person to achieve the Oceans Seven, tries to make sense of his life one stroke at a time in the isolation of the cold Atlantic Ocean in The Swimmer [see trailer above].

For other open water swimming venues in films over the past several decades, other than Ireland's Fastnet Rock in the film above, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Vision Of Double Dip Frank

Courtesy of Sally Coghlan McDonald, San Francisco, California.

On July 21st, the 42nd Trans Tahoe Relay will be held...thanks to the vision and passion of Frank Coghlan.

The well-liked, much-respected swimming regular from the South End Rowing Club swam in the San Francisco Bay almost every day until he was 80 years old.

He also swam for years in Lake Tahoe where he envisioned a race despite the cold waters and high altitude.

In 1976, he convinced 12 swimmers - 6 from the Dolphin Club and 6 from the South End Rowing Club, to swim across the lake from Glenbrook to Homewood. When The Olympic Club of San Francisco sponsored the race, then known as the Lake Tahoe Swim, teams from Australia, Hawaii and across the continental United States joined and the number of teams began its four-decade upward trajectory.

By 1978, Coghlan swam across the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York and across the San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge in the same day and the legend of Double Dip Frank was born. He later did his own solo across Lake Tahoe in 6 hours 37 minutes at the age of 50.

With another three decades of swimming left in him, he continued to swim from Alcatraz Island (over 50 times) as well as dozens of times underneath the span of the Golden Gate Bridge at the mouth of San Francisco Bay.

His daughter Sally Coghlan McDonald recalls the legacy that her father left in the open water. "Coghlan Beach is a small sandy beach at the end of a spit of land that forms the outer edge of the harbor behind Marina Green [in San Francisco Bay between Aquatic Park and the Golden Gate Bridge].

The beach was named for him after he was pulled in there by the tides during a long swim. He was over a mile from his destination and had to be picked up by one of the pilots. It was so foggy that day he had no idea where he was – he could not see the entrance to the harbor only a few yards away. He stood there in his Speedos and bright orange cap until one of the rowers came to get him. That may be the only time he was every picked up by a pilot boat. He was a VERY strong swimmer and finished what he started.

Needless to say, he received a lot of good-natured ribbing from the other members of the club, especially those much younger than he was. They named the beach in his honor. Though it started out as something of a joke, the name stuck. Every year since then the Coghlan Beach Fun Swim is on the calendar of local swims
."

For more information on the July 21st race across Lake Tahoe, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Monday, January 15, 2018

Fausto Brondo To Debut At Maratón Santa Fe – Coronda

Courtesy of Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe – Coronda, Coronda River, Argentina.

Fausto Brondo from Paraná, Argentina won the Selectivo on November 25th 2017 to qualified for the 57 Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe – Coronda. "Since last year, I wanted to compete in Santa Fe - Coronda. [But] there was no possibility of entering the [qualification race] last year. This year, I competed with low expectations but luckily I got it right."

It will be his first race of the 57 km river race on the FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series. "I want to enjoy the marathon, if I can finish within the top ten swimmers, that would be the best. It's very hard and I have no idea what I'm going to find. I'm going to try to push the pace."

His coach Carlos Scocco has been pushing him 12-13 km per day with an increase to 14-15 km since December in preparation of his debut. "I can fulfill one of my goals that I promised myself a long time ago. Finishing would be the best and finishing well would be excellent. I will give everything that I have and hope to enjoy every moment."

Copyright © 2008-2017 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Pilar Geijo Offers An Intensive Clinic In Mallorca

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Just before being inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame in England as an Honor Swimmer in the Class of 208, Pilar Geijo will hold a bilingual (English + Spanish) Open Water Swimming Intensive Clinic in Colonia Sant Jordi on the Spanish island of Mallorca between March 23rd - 26th.

With sessions in the pool and open water, Geijo will augment her clinic with motivational talks and technical drills for open water swimmers.

Geijo is a four-time FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series world champion (2010, 2011, 2014 and 2015 with runner-up finishes in 2009, 2012 and 2016) who has finished in the Top 3 in 35 different international marathon swims including the Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli, Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean, Maratón Hernandarias-Paraná, and received the World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year award in 2011, the Olimpia, Clarín y Jorge Newbery de Oro in Argentina.

"With her many years of racing and swimming in cold water, warm water, calm conditions, and turbulent conditions under sunny skies and in the rain among the best professional marathon swimmers in different continents, rivers, lakes, seas and oceans around the world, Pilar has a depth of experiences and different perspectives that are invaluable for swimmers to learn," said Steven Munatones. "She is also deeply kind, incredibly positive and personable so her clinic will be a great opportunity for all those who participate."

Her clinic includes:

• 3 nights at a 4-star hotel with half board located 6-7 minutes walking from the pool
• Four 2-hour swim training sessions including 3 pool sessions at the BEST Centre, a 50m outdoor pool + 1 open water session in the Mediterranean Sea with stretching and mobility specific for swimming
• A motivational talk and time for Q&A with coffee and snacks
• Teaching of freestyle technique, including open water-specific skills and drills for open water swimmers and triathletes
• Training kit
• Lunch on Monday with raffles and prizes

For more information and to register, email owintensiveclinic@gmail.com.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Joe Grossman Brings Alive Marathon Swimming's Past

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

In order to preserve marathon swimming history, Dale Petranech has kept alive his dream of publishing the personal files of World Professional Marathon Swimming Association administrator, Joe Grossman.

"Joe passed away in 1974, but Dale faithfully maintained a huge stack of type-written pages from Joe for several decades.

The public information officer traveled around the world with a passion and a unique perspective of the individuals involved in the sport of channel swimming and professional marathon swimming and single-handedly and comprehensively compiled hundreds of pages of notes, observations, recollections and data from solo swims and competitions in numerous bodies of water around the globe
," says Steven Munatones.

"Dale worked with editor Steve Walker to organize and edit these memorandums on carefully typed-out pages - written in the era before the laptop and the Internet. Their work - based on Joe's first-hand work on shores and escort boats around the world - captures slices of history that were previously only known to the athletes, race directors, and escort pilots of long-gone generations.

Joe had undisputedly cemented his legacy on the sport through his work with the World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation, but his newly published book, A History of Marathon Swimming - has emerged 43 years after his death. It is an invaluable treasure because it lays out the actions and achievements of the athletes, describes the backgrounds and battles of famous competitions, and explains the historical trends that shaped the sport throughout the bulk of the 20th century
."

The 536-page book covers races and swimmers, promoters and pilots from 1875 to 1974.

Ned Denison, chairman of the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, describes the book. "If you love stories about the earlier days of open water swimming - you will love this book. The stars you have previous heard about come to life - warts and all. I have a fair few such books but this is easily in my top three."

The book includes chapters on Matthew Webb, Gertrude Ederle, William Wrigley's unprecedented Catalina Channel race in 1927, solo swims across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Billy Butlin's English Channel races, the Canadian National Exhibition events, and many other events and accomplishments achieved by the fastest, toughest and most prolific swimmers at many of the sport's most famous events and venues. His thorough research and first-person recollections could only be compiled by someone who was present and knowledgeable of the athletes and sport.

For more information and to purchase A History of Marathon Swimming on Amazon, visit here.

Joe Grossman is shown above applying channel grease to Greta Andersen before an English Channel crossing in the 1950's.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Water Temperature Research Led To New Water Temp Rules

Courtesy of Doctors Jane Saycell, Mitch Lomax, Heather Massey, and Mike Tipton of the Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth at the 2016 FINA Sports Medicine Congress.

A comprehensive study of swimmers' physiological reactions and their own perceptions to swimming in water colder than 20°C was conducted by Dr. Jane Saycell, Dr. Mitch Lomax, Dr. Heather Massey, and Dr. Mike Tipton of the University of Portsmouth.

Their work quickly led to fundamental changes in FINA rules regarding water temperature and use of wetsuits that were enacted on January 1st 2017.

The university team of researchers presented a study called 'Safe lower water temperatures for elite marathon swimming and triathlon' at the 2016 FINA Sports Medicine Congress in Windsor, Ontario, Canada in December 2016.

The research team examined the following issues:

* What is a physiologically safe lower water temperature for elite endurance swimming?
* What is the relationship between low water temperature and duration of endurance swimming?
* What are the individual athlete parameters that affect ability to cope with cold environmental factors (e.g., sex, age, body fat percentage, experience)?
* Are athletes able to reliably assess comfort and perceived stress that mirrors physiological responses?
* What is the effect of ambient temperature and wind chill on the comfort and physiological demands of the athletes?
* What is the physiological benefit and protection offered by a competitive swimming wetsuit?

They explained what happens when the swimmers are immersed in cold water:

Cold receptor channels on free afferent nerve endings are activated by the cold. The afferent signal is detected in the hypothalamus leading to a release of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) as a neurotransmitter.

With cold shock, the athlete's sympathetic nervous system is activated. Gasps are followed by hyperventilation and the heart rate increases while vasoconstriction leads to increased blood pressure. Ongoing responses includes an increased vasoconstriction that improves the insulation of the core and an increased metabolic heat production from shivering.

As the swimmer enters cold water, there is cold shock and heat loss from the body through conduction. Blood flow is maintained to the working muscle while insulation is provided only by subcutaneous fat. Muscles may cool before the core does which leads to the potential for swim failure. As the core cools, the athlete will eventually experience hypothermia. Even if the athlete exits the water, core cooling may continue for some time.

The researchers conducted three field studies at 9 open water swimming events in the UK and Canada where they monitored 228 swimmers before and after races. They compared a triathlon study with 12 lean, competitive triathletes who completed a simulated swim, transition and cycle in a laboratory over 5 different temperature and wetsuit conditions. They also tested 12 competitive swimmers who swam for 2 hours in water temperatures varying between 14-20°C.

108 females, including 32 elite or sub-elite swimmers, did 134 wetsuit swims with 66 swims in water less than 16°C.

120 males, including 38 novice swimmers, did 94 non-wetsuit swims, 46 swims in water over 18°C and 116 swims between 16-18°C.

The researchers measured deep body temperatures with a GI pill, body mass index, skinfolds, height, wetsuit use, type and thickness, and acclimatization, experience and ability that were assessed via a questionnaire. The water temperature was measured at three different depths in the middle of the course, wind speed, WBGT and current flow.

The 2-hour non-wetsuit marathon swim study was conducted in water temperatures at 14°C, 16°C, 18°C and 20°C. The researchers measured the swimmers' deep body temperature during and after the swims, perceptions of the cold, various physiological parameters like heart rate and oxygen uptake, and swim efficiency.

The researchers found that 226 of the 228 swimmers completed their swim, but 14 swimmers experienced hypothermia (defined at deep body temperature less than 35°C during or after the swim. 199 swimmers showed their lowest deep body temperature approximately 30 minutes post-swim. They found that there was no influence due to ambient temperature and, not surprisingly, the thinner swimmers were more likely to cool and the non-wetsuit swimmers cooled more than the wetsuited swimmers. They observed that the elite swimmers were significantly leaner than the other swimmers.

Their conclusions were as follows:

Q1. What is a physiologically safe lower water temperature for elite endurance swimming?
A1. For lean, elite level swimmers, 16°C and 18°C will cause hypothermia in under two hours. For a shorter swim, 16°C is possible. Swimmers are likely to be coolest some time after existing the water.

Q2. What is the relationship between low water temperature and duration of endurance swimming?
A2. Swimmers follow a linear pattern of cooling: the longer the swim, the greater the fall in deep body temperature.

Q3. What are the individual athlete parameters that affect ability to cope with cold environmental factors (e.g., sex, age, body fat percentage, experience)?
A3. Leaner swimmers are most likely to cool, regardless of acclimatization or other factors.

Q4. Are athletes able to reliably assess comfort and perceived stress that mirrors physiological responses?
A4. No, swimmers have an unreliable perception of cold stress.

Q5. What is the effect of ambient temperature and wind chill on the comfort and physiological demands of the athletes?
A5. Ambient conditions have no influence on the deep body temperature of swimmers in the water.

Q6. What is the physiological benefit and protection offered by a competitive swimming wetsuit?
A6. Wetsuits provide some protection against cooling. Further studies would be required to say exactly how much for any given water temperature and time in the water.

The researchers recommended the following:

* In order to reduce the risk from cold shock, athletes should have exposure to the water before swimming.
* Safety personnel should understand the signs of swim failure.
* For marathon swims, a minimum water temperature of 18°C-20°C should be set for long distance elite non-wetsuit swimming. This would be a compromise between safety and the ability to run events.
* Regarding aftercare, swimmers should be supervised after races and offered advice and facilities for safe rewarming.

As a result, FINA enacted new rules about its allowable competition swimwear on January 1st 2017. The FINA Bureau changed its rules on swimwear and allows use of wetsuits and neoprene in its competitions below certain water temperature thresholds. FINA's rules include the following:

BL 8.4 For open water swimming competitions with water temperature from 20°C [68°F], swimsuits for both men and women shall not cover the neck, nor extend past the shoulder, nor extend below the ankle. Subject to these specific shape specifications, swimsuits for open water swimming competitions shall further comply with all other requirements applicable to swimsuits for pool swimming competition.

BL 8.5 From January 1, 2017, for open water swimming competitions in water with temperature below 20°C, men and women may use either swimsuits (BL 8.4) or wetsuits. When the water temperature is below 18°C, the use of wetsuits is compulsory. For the purpose of these rules, wetsuits are swimsuits made of material providing thermal insulation. Wetsuits for both men and women shall completely cover torso, back, shoulders and knees. They shall not extend beyond the neck, wrists and ankles.


The new rules were instituted due to concerns that the FINA Bureau has regarding conducting events in low temperatures (defined at 20°C or below). "FINA...will take all necessary measures to ensure the maximum possible levels of security and safety for all athletes in [its] races," stated FINA.

Note: the lowest possible water temperature allowable in FINA races is 16°C.

Funding for this research was provided by the International Olympic Committee, the International Triathlon Union, and FINA.

The data collection volunteers included Clare Eglin, Roger Eglin, Anna Eglin, Naomi Collier, Carl Massey, Liam Colley, Richard Herrigan, Megan Davis, Andrew Scott, Colin Iggleden, Joe Costello, Gill Ralphs, Heather Larsen, Di Hewetson, Emma Warren, and Sarah Evered.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Types Of Open Water Swimming Starts

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Open water swimming has all kinds of types of start, depending on the event and location.

Starts can be in-the-water, on the beach, from a dive on a floating pontoon, a run down the beach, from a pier or a boat.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Poliana & Ricardo Cintra: 3 For 3 From 2008 To 2016

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

On the forearm of Brazilian coach Ricardo Cintra, there is a unique tattoo.

The tattoo celebrates the 3-time participation in the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympic 10K Marathon Swim by his wife and Olympic bronze medalist Poliana Okimoto, the only athlete to have qualified for all three 10 km marathon swims at the Summer Olympics to date.

At the inaugural 10 km marathon swim in Beijing, Okimoto finished 7th in 1:59:37.4 in a rowing basin, less than 10 seconds behind gold medalist Larisa Ilchenko of Russia. She did not finish the 10 km marathon swim in London's Serpentina in 2012 and she earned a bronze medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics, finishing in 1:56:51.4 on Copacabana Beach.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Cruising For Creativing

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Dr. Marily Oppezzo, an Instructor of Medicine and an educational psychologist at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, studies how the movement of the body can affect the movement of the mind.

"She eloquently elucidated what we have always personally experienced and inherently thought was true - at least for an open water swimmer.," observed Steven Munatones about her talk [see above] at a TEDxStanford event last year.

"I have always come up with interesting concepts or business ideas - or at least what I thought was interesting about things ranging from the Oceans Seven to KAATSU Aqua - while swimming.

But I found tapping into your imagination and inherent curiosity or creativity cannot be achieved while swimming hard or doing interval training. All-out speed and focused intensity are not conducive to free-flowing creative thinking. Rather cruising in the water and swimming at a relaxed, comfortable pace is the ideal environment in a pool or in the ocean - for a swimmer to maximize his or her imagination, identify solutions or attack problems from alternative perspectives. In her research, Dr. Oppezzo confirmed these experiences
."

Yoshiro Nakamatsu (Dr. NakaMats) with 3,357 patents to his name also appreciates exploring his creativity while swimming:



Oppezzo advises her students and audience to go for a walk in order to stimulate their creativity. Swimmers can do the same, creating a similarly imaginative environment while going for a relaxed swim in the pool or creating a wake in a lake, sea or ocean.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Michael Twigg-Smith On Molokai Channel Crossings

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach.

Michael Twigg-Smith grew up on Oahu and is an multi-talented waterman from Hawaii.

He played water polo, swam competitively, has paddled 6-man canoes for Waikiki Surf Club and Waikiki Beach Boys across the Molokai Channel 7 times between 1990 and 2002, surfs and windsurfs throughout the state, and is a member of Heartbeat sailing team of the Waikiki Yacht Club.

Over the last several years, he has escorted soloists and relays 42 km across the Molokai Channel between the islands Oahu and Molokai.

Aboard the Stellina Mare, he has escorted the following 27 individuals and relay teams (with 18 successful crossings) of the Molokai Channel between the islands of Molokai and Oahu in Hawaii between 2013 and 2018 [to date]:


2013
1. The Veterans (a relay with Karen Schmidt, Amy Dantzler, Brent Blackman, Bill Ireland, Bruce Thomas, Dianne Gleason) from Molokai to Oahu in 9 hours 45 minutes. "Six swimmers to compete in the inaugural relay race across the Kaiwi Channel."
2. Richard W. Gaenzle, Jr., Brian Ross, Chris Kraus, a 3-man relay in 13 hours 45 minutes. "Three guys from New York."

2014
3. Cameron Keith from Cairns, Australia in 13 hours 55 minutes. "The 15-year-old was youngest to swim the course. It was very calm conditions."
4. Rohan More from India in 17 hours 30 minutes "who came with his mom."

2015
5. Boguslaw Ogrodnik from Poland "did not finish due to becoming seasick"
6. Stephen Junk from Australia "did not finish due to becoming seasick"
7. Brothers John Royer and Mark Royer from the USA "completed their relay in a rain squall in 14 hours 30 minutes"
8. Attila Manyoki from Hungary "set a new record time in 12 hours 2 minutes in the roughest conditions ever, but he had a favorable current at the end"
9. Romano Mombelli from Switzerland did not finish due to Portuguese man o war stings
10. Andre Wiersig from Germany finished in 18 hours 26 minutes

2016
11. Daniel Curtis from the USA "cancelled his attempt due to extremely large surf in February"
12. Antonio Argüelles Díaz-González from Mexico completed his crossing in 23 hours 18 minutes. "We had to start at La'au Point because of big surf and the beach at Kaluakoi was gone, completely washed out, just rocks there. Whales came over to check out the swimmer, the current took us all the way to Hanauma Bay."
13. A 6-person Russian team led by Sergi "did not finish due to white tip sharks"
14. Ranie Pearce from California "did not finish due to tiger sharks" [video shown above]
15. Adrian Sarchet from Guernsey, one of the British Channel Islands, "started at 1:35 am and finished at 6:59 pm. His 17 hour 24 minute crossing was a really tough swim; we had the first drone footage shot of a person finishing the channel" [video shown above]
16. Jorge Crivilles Villanueva from Spain "started his swim at 5:44 am and finished at 11:38 am. His 17 hour 54 minute crossing was the first by a Spanish national. He took a very northerly course and finished at Alan Davis Beach. During the swim, he was approached by tiger sharks. When one got really close, he shook the Shark Shield at it and it swam away."
17. Dr. Thomas Hackett from the USA started at 6:34 pm and finished at 9:27 am. "His 14 hour 53 minute swim that finished at Alan Davis Beach was done under favorable conditions."
18. Stephen Junk from Australia started at 4:07 pm and finished at 5:57 am. "His 13 hour 50 minute crossing was his second attempt and he faced winds that were way stronger than predicted. It was very rough, but the waves were pushing us straight towards Oahu. We arrived at Alan Davis Beach while it was still dark and we had to continue to Sandy Beach where it was barely daybreak."
19. Beth French from Great Britain started her 17 hour 59 minute crossing at 3:05 pm and finished at 9:04 am. "She became the first female to complete the course two times. The currents and weather were very favorable; Stefan Stuckert and crew filmed the whole way where she finished at Alan Davis Beach."

2017
20. Abhejali Berdonova from the Czech Republic started her 22 hour 8 minute crossing at 5:21 pm and finished at 3:13 pm. "She got pushed 1 nautical mile north for the first half, and north again on Makapu'u Ledge, finished at Sandy Beach. She became the first person from the Czech Republic to complete the course."
21. Cae Tolman started at 5:06 pm and "swam for 17 hours but did not finish. There was an incredible riptide was eddying us around and pushing us back towards Molokai. The first seven hours were great; he made it to the halfway point, but then the current pushed us back."
22. Pat Gallant-Charette from the USA started at 5:27 pm and finished at 5:21 pm for a 23 hour 54 minute crossing. "At 66 years and 107 days old, she was the oldest person to complete the Molokai Channel. She fought a persistent current moving to the southwest for 18 hours and swam past pilot whales spouting rainbows."
23. Prabhat Koli, a 17-year-old from Mumbai, India "started at 6:08 pm and finished at 11:30 am for a 17 hour 22 minute crossing."
24 & 25. Nora Toledano and Mariel Hawley Davila from Mexico City "started their tandem swim at 6:15 pm and finished at 8:43 am for a 14 hour 28 minute crossing from Molokai to Oahu 1 day after a full moon with very light currents in very straight line."
26. Sergio Salomone from Argentina "did not finish despite a beautifully calm ride over to Molokai, but then as soon as night fell, the ocean became very very rough. The current pushed north throughout the swim before his brutal battle at the Makapu'u Ledge where he stopped 6 km from Makapuu Beach after swimming for 16 hours 25 minutes."
27. Matías Ola from Argentina "did not finish as the current pushed north as he swam for 17 hours before exiting the water."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Edgar Adalberto Coelho, Persistent, Determined, Victorious

Courtesy of Adherbal de Oliveira, Leme to Pontal Swimming Association, Brazil.

On January 11th, Edgar Adalberto Coelho set off on his second attempt of the 35 km Travessia do Leme ao Pontal along the coast of Rio de Janeiro.

In December 2017, Coelho made his first attempt of the course, but he did not finish because of the currents and wind.

But his DNF of 14 hours where he was pulled only 3 km from the finish only served to motivate him even more. He secured a second window between January 11th and 17th.

"Starting near midnight, Edgar was very happy and determined to complete the challenge. He believed that with the experience of the previous swim, his challenge could be simpler," reported Adherbal de Oliveira of the Leme to Pontal Swimming Association.

"However, this time, he was tested during the middle of the challenge when the wind turned suddenly to the southwest with great intensity while a storm threatened. He was very brave and swam very strongly against the wind and the oncoming waves. After two hours of fighting the elements, he was exhausted. Edgar's energy was completely depleted, but he still had about 18 km to go.

His support team tried to push Edgar but he no longer had the energy to maintain a strong pace and ended up becoming very vulnerable to the currents. The pilot performed several maneuvers so Edgar was aligned with the undulations of the ocean. The strategy was successful and he started to advance very slowly towards Pontal Beach
."

Ultimately after 14 hours 40 minutes he arrived at Pontal, walked upon the shore and was able to raise his arms on shore, celebrating his finish as the 12th person in history to finish the swim.

Those interested can access the Leme to Pontal Swimming Association at www.swimlpsa.com.br and request registration from secretary@swimlpsa.com.br.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Marcio Junqueira Completes Travessia do Leme ao Pontal

Courtesy of Adherbal de Oliveira, Leme to Pontal Swimming Association, Brazil.

On January 8th at near midnight, Marcio Santos Junqueira started the 35 km Travessia do Leme ao Pontal. He swam along the coast of Rio de Janeiro, passing Sugar Loaf, the Christ the Redeemer statue, Cagarras Archipelago, Arpoador, and the beaches of Copacabana and Ipanema facing currents, winds, and the presence of jellyfish.

Past midnight and for the next two hours, he swam in place in the difficult currents of Barra da Tijuca beach.

"But he was brave and had the mental and physical strength to overcome the adversities and complete the challenge in 11 hours 49 minutes, the 11th solo swimmer in Leme to Pontal history," reported Adherbal de Oliveira of the Leme to Pontal Swimming Association.

Santos said of his efforts and what he considers his greatest athletic achievement, "I knew it would be difficult and I respected it from the beginning, but I did not expect to face so many difficulties."

Those interested can access the Leme to Pontal Swimming Association at www.swimlpsa.com.br and request registration from secretary@swimlpsa.com.br.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming With Shivers And Smiles

Courtesy of Gary Standen, Swimming With Shivers.

Gary Standen and Claire Bunker-Fellingham co-wrote Swimming With Shivers.

The book includes true stories from and about open water swimmers doing cold water, winter and ice swimming with a foreword by Colin Hill of Chillswim and Sally Minty-Gravett MBE that includes Elaine Howley's dramatic swim in the ice kilometer at the 2017 Ice Swimming Aqua Sphere World Championships in Burghausen, Germany.

Standen describes the book, "The swimmers explain in their own words why they thrive on getting into low temperature waters in seas, rivers, lakes and even event swimming courses cut-out of ice. The book allows the reader to understand who these swimmers are, where they swim and how they survive the afterdrop and post-swim shivers safely all year round."

To order both Swimming With Shivers and Swimming With Smiles, visit www.swimmingwithshivers.com and www.altern8ives.com.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, January 12, 2018

Who's Who In English Channel's Over-and-Back



Data courtesy of Julian Critchlow, video courtesy of Graeme Lowe, English Channel
.

Julian Critchlow, a three-time English Channel swimmer, compiled an historic archive of all successful two-way crossings of the English Channel. The 30 athletes are listed from the oldest to youngest:

1. Sally Minty-Gravett MBE (Jersey)
* at the age of 59 in 36 hours 26 minutes in 2016
2. Elizabeth Fry (USA)
* at the age of 52 in 24 hours 41 minutes in 2011
3. Dr. Marcy MacDonald (USA)
* at the age of 37 in 21 hours 19 minutes
* at the age of 40 in 23 hours 0 minutes
* at the age of 49 in 24 hours 16 minutes
4. Anne Cleveland (USA)
* at the age of 48 in 28 hours 36 minutes
5. Wendy Trehiou (Jersey)
* at the age of 44 in 39 hours 9 minutes
6. David Parcells (USA)
* at the age of 44 in 21 hours 30 minutes
7. Dori Miller (USA)
* at the age of 43 in 26 hours 21 minutes
8. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina)
* at the age of 43 in 43 hours 10 minutes
9. Stuart Johnson (Australia)
* at the age of 40 in 25 hours 50 minutes
* at the age of 41 in 24 hours 30 minutes
* at the age of 43 in 19 hours 47 minutes
10. Kevin Murphy (UK)
* at the age of 21 in 35 hours 10 minutes
* at the age of 26 in 36 hours 3 minutes [en route to a 3-way attempt]
* 38 in 32 hours 42 minutes
11. Jon Erikson (USA)
* at the age of 20 in 29 hours 50 minutes
* at the age of 24 in 22 hours 16 minutes
* at the age of 26 in 23 hours 24 minutes [en route to 3-way crossing]
12. Ted Erikson (USA)
* at the age of 37 in 30 hours 3 minutes
13. Jaime Caballero Echeverría (Spain)
* at the age of 37 in 25 hours 35 minutes
14. John van Wisse (Australia)
* at the age of 37 in 19 hours 55 minutes [en route to a 3-way attempt]
15. Deirdre Ward (Ireland)
* at the age of 36 in 27 hours 52 minutes
16. Igor de Souza (Brazil)
* at the age of 34 in 18 hours 33 minutes*
17. Rebecca Lewis (UK)
* at the age of 32 in 20 hours 15 minutes
18. Chloë McCardel (Australia)
* at the age of 25 in 21 hours 48 minutes
* at the age of 27 in 19 hours 21 minutes
* at the age of 30 in 22 hours 42 minutes [en route to a 3-way crossing]
19. Alison Streeter MBE (UK)
* at the age of 18 in 21 hours 16 minutes
* at the age of 25 in 21 hours 11 minutes [en route to a 3-way crossing]
* at the age of 27 in 22 hours 20 minutes, at the age of 30 in 20 hours 55 minutes
20. Liane Llewellyn Hickling (UK)
* at the age of 27 in 27 hours 35 minutes
21. Lisa Cummins (Ireland)
* at the age of 26 in 35 hours 0 minutes
22. Paula Townley-Rivett (UK)
* at the age of 25 in 22 hours 11 minutes
23. Cindy Nicholas (Canada)
* at the age of 20 in 19 hours 55 minutes**
* at the age of 21 in 19 hours 12 minutes
* at the age of 23 in 22 hours 21 minutes
* at the age of 25 in 18 hours 55 minutes
* at the age of 25 in 20 hours 9 minutes (16 days after her previous 2-way)
24. Nora Toledano Cadena (Mexico)
* at the age of 24 in 23 hours 38 minutes
25. Dr. Osama Ahmed Momtaz (Egypt)
* at the age of 23 in 21 hours 37 minutes
26. Irene van der Laan (Netherlands)
* at the age of 22 in 18 hours 15 minutes
27. Philip Rush (New Zealand)
* at the age of 21 in 17 hours 56 minutes
* at the age of 23 in 16 hours 10 minutes [en route to a 3-way crossing]
28. David Čech (Czech Republic)
* at the age of 20 in 19 hours 54 minutes
29. Nick Adams (UK)
* at the age of 18 in 27 hours 28 minutes
30. Susie Maroney (Australia)
* at the age of 16 in 17 hours 14 minutes

* De Souza's two-way crossing in 1997 was remarkable because both his first leg of 9 hours 31 minutes and his second leg of 9 hours 2 minutes were the fastest times for English Channel crossings
** Cindy Nicholas' 2-way crossing in 1977 was 10 hours 5 minutes faster than the previous record, breaking the previous male record

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Neda el Món Circling Soffi, Lavezzi, Cavallo

Isola di Lavezzi courtesy of Omero Moretti, Sardinia, Italy.

Neda el Món goes to La Maddalena in Sardinia, Italy.

Participants do three circumnavigation swims around three islands in three days while sleeping on spectacular Sardinian sailboats that also follow their swims:

* Day 1: 3.2 km around Isola Soffi
* Day 2: 4.8 km around Isola Lavezzi
* Day 3: 5.7 km around Isola Cavallo

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Ocean And Great Lake Film Festival In Michigan

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The 6th annual Thunder Bay International Film Festival will bring the International Ocean Film Festival to Alpena, Michigan on January 24th - 28th at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

Every year, the Friends of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary bring the world of cinema to Alpena! For five days in January, northeast Michigan is treated to some of the most impressive ocean and Great Lakes films from around the world. Film screenings are complemented by social events, educational activities, and opportunities to meet filmmakers.

Film Festival Coordinator Stephanie Gandulla Stephanie Gandulla describes the festival. "Every year, the Friends of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary bring the world of cinema to Alpena.

For five days in January, northeast Michigan is treated to some of the most impressive ocean and Great Lakes films from around the world. Film screenings are complemented by social events, educational activities, and opportunities to meet filmmakers
."

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Kim Swims With Kate Webber

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Kate Webber has been showing her latest film, KIM SWIMS, around the country, but now is preparing to headline the International Ocean Film Festival in her San Francisco training grounds.

On the 15th anniversary of the International Ocean Film Festival, KIM SWIMS will kick-off the four-day festival. "Kim Chambers' strength and dedication is palpable as the film follows her pursuit to be the first woman to swim the 30 miles from the Farallon Islands to the Golden Gate Bridge," promotes Festival Executive Director Ana Blanco about the March 8th Opening Night at Cowell Theater in Fort Mason Center for Arts and Culture.

In addition to Webber's documentary film, there will be more than 50 films shown between March 8th - 11th.

For more information, visit oceanfilmfest.org.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Watching And Rewatching Long Swims On YouTube

Courtesy of 5 Bullet Friday.

Influential American author and entrepreneur Tim Ferriss, who gave a beautiful eulogy of the recently passed Terry Laughlin and a passionate advocate of Total Immersion, described a useful keyboard shortcut on YouTube:

* Press J to rewind 10 seconds
* Press K to pause
* Press L to fast forward 10 seconds

As Ferriss described, "It’s incredibly helpful when moving around in longer videos or trying to repeat what you just saw/heard, as clicking on the progress bar itself can lead to jumping around in 4-5-minute increments."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Andrew Malinak Wins Service to Marathon Swimming Award

Courtesy of Marathon Swimmers Federation, Lake Champlain, California.

Andrew Malinak won the 2017 Streeter Award for Service to Marathon Swimming by the Marathon Swimmers Federation for co-founding and leading the Northwest Open Water Swimming Association and for piloting Sarah Thomas’ Century Swim in Lake Champlain in August 2017.

Malinak joined the following recipients of the award:

2013: The Dover Beach Crew (UK)
2014: Neil van der Byl and Grace van der Byl (USA)
2015: Dan Simonelli (USA)
2016: New York Open Water: David Barra, Rondi Davies, Alex Arévalo (USA)

For more 2017 Marathon Swimmers Federation award announcements, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sarah Thomas Wins 2017 Solo Swim Of The Year

Courtesy of Marathon Swimmers Federation, Lake Champlain, New York.

It has been an incredible year for American marathon swimmer Sarah Thomas of Colorado.

Not only did she complete a 40 km double circumnavigation of Mercer Island in Washington, won the women's division at the 17 km Portland Bridge Swim in Oregon, and finished 6th overall in the 16 km Swim The Suck.

But it was her 67 hour 16 minute Century Swim of 104.6 miles (168.3 km) in Lake Champlain between New York and Vermont that led to her winning the 2017 Solo Swim of the Year by the Marathon Swimmers Federation.

For more 2017 Marathon Swimmers Federation awards, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Abigail Fairman Wins Barra Award For Most Prolific Year

Courtesy of Marathon Swimmers Federation.

42-year-old Abigail Fairman has enjoyed all kinds of experiences throughout the Americas during 2017.

Among her many marathon swims, she completed all 4 stages of the 4-day 66.9 km S.C.A.R. Swim Challenge, all 7 stages of the 193 km 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim, 25 km Kingdom Swim Border Buster, 27.3 km Rose Pitonof Swim, Lake George 10K, 12.9 km Bender Memorial Swim, 30 km 3 Rivers Marathon Swim, 19.3 km Swim Around Charleston, and the 10 km Bermuda Round The Sound.

For her efforts, she was very deservedly awarded the 2017 Barra Award for Most Prolific Year by a female.

Her male counterpart was Stephen Rouch.

For more 2017 Marathon Swimmers Federation award announcements, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Stephen Rouch Wins Barra Award For Most Prolific Year

Courtesy of Marathon Swimmers Federation, 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim, New York.

Stephen Rouch has enjoyed all kinds of experiences throughout the United States in 2017.

Among his many marathon swims, he completed all 4 stages of the 4-day 66.9 km S.C.A.R. Swim Challenge, all 7 stages of the 193 km 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim, 14.8 km Chattanooga Swim Festival, 25 km Kingdom Swim Border Buster, 10 km Swim to the Moon, 30 km 3 Rivers Marathon Swim, and the 10-mile Swim the Suck.

For his efforts, he was very deservedly awarded the 2017 Barra Award for Most Prolific Year by a male.

His female counterpart was Abigail Fairman.

For more 2017 Marathon Swimmers Federation award announcements, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Jaimie Monahan Wins 2017 Yudovin Award For Most Adventurous Swim

Courtesy of Marathon Swimmers Federation, Lago Maggiore, Italy.

Jaimie Monahan is always doing the extreme whether it is ice swims in Russia, becoming an Ice Ironwoman and Ice Zero Swimmer, mid-winter workouts with the Coney Island Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers Club in Brooklyn, winter swimming competitions in Windermere, marathon swimming twice around Manhattan Island, or completing the first Ice Sevens in history.

But for all her exploits and achievements, the Marathon Swimmers Federation awarded the 38-year-old professional the 2017 Yudovin Award for the Most Adventurous Swim.

Her achievement - among many - was the first unassisted cross-border 37-mile (59.6 km) swim across Lago Maggiore in 24 hours 2 minutes from Tenero-Contra, Switzerland to Sesto Calende, Italy.

Lago Maggiore borders Switzerland and Italy and located north between the mountains of Piedmont and the Swiss Alps.

It has been quite a year for the two-time World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year - and her unprecedented Lago Maggiore crossing was but just one remarkable swim of many.

Photo of Jaimie Monahan courtesy of Arik Thormahlen.

For more 2017 Marathon Swimmers Federation award announcements, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Growing Up And Realizing A Dream

Courtesy of Alejandro Martínez, Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda, Argentina.

Erika Yenssen is a 19-year-old qualifier of the 44th edition of the 57 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda.

The psychology student will compete in the 57 km river race on February 4th. "I am very happy to qualify for the Santa Fe - Coronda race in 2018. I think it is one of the races that a girl dreams of competing.

The goal that I have in this race is first to finish. I think it is the priority; it is very demanding, they are many hours and that is why we have to train well because the head plays a key factor.

I have not participated in marathon races; only shorter races of not more than five hours of race
."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Mindfulness & The Endurance Athlete

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Bruckner Chase and Michelle Evans-Chase will give a 2-hour speech and Q&A period called 'Mindfulness and the Endurance Athlete' held at the GU Energy Labs in Berkeley, California on January 18th.

The husband-and-wife team will discuss the science and tools behind training an endurance athlete's brain to respond to the expected and unexpected stress of their endurance life.

"Every athlete’s best or worst workout, race or season depends on more than the miles they log on land or in the water, and any athlete’s ultimate potential depends on how their brain is trained to respond to the positive and negative moments that compose an endurance life," explains Chase.

"Beyond VO2 Max, FTP or LT is how anyone can rewire their brain to respond when the unexpected wave, trail or competitor intersects with the best-planned race."

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

#GreenSash @imshofame #IMSHOFinductee

Courtesy of Melissa Cunningham, International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame.

Melissa Cunningham, an Honor Swimmer and a member of the Executive Committee of the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, announced a new Instagram account for the IMSHOF (see @imshofame).

"We would love to celebrate your achievements and from time to time we will contact you for content," the former Australian 1994 world 25 km champion and 2008 Olympic 10K Marathon Swim announcer explained.

"We are currently posting about where you keep your green IMSHOF sash. If you would like to join in, don't forget to tag @imshofame and use the hashtags #GreenSash #IMSHOF #IMSHOFinductee.

[Former International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame Chairman] Chris Guesdon keeps his sash on the legendary comic character The Phantom. Legend so it goes says, 'The ghost who walks the man who never dies.' This giant size image is on his office door and has always kept his sash safe."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Intersection, Inspiration Of Florence Chadwick, Marilyn Bell

Courtesy of Marilyn DiLascio, Hudson Valley, New York.

In September 1954, Marilyn Bell DiLascio and Florence Chadwick started their separate solo swims across Lake Ontario from New York to Toronto at nearly the same time.

While Chadwick was offered $10,000 to make the crossing, Bell set off without the expectation of a payoff. 20 hours 59 minutes and 51.5 km later, Bell made the swim.

In 1955, the two women each crossed the English Channel: Bell on July 31st in 14 hours 36 minutes and Chadwick in October 11th in 13 hours 55 minutes.

The next year in 1956, Chadwick attempted a crossing of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Lake Ontario. "But the crossings were not kind to her," wrote Bell "However it was her attempt at Strait of Juan de Fuca that motivated me to give it a try in 1956. Ironically, her coaches were both on my support team.

Archie McKinnon served as my official observer and was later inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame for his outstanding contribution to Canadian Competitive Swimming. Jack Todd was a well-known philanthropist and distinguished in the sailing community. He volunteered to operate my escort boat on every training swim, my failed attempt, and my successful swim [10 hours 38 minutes on August 23rd 1956].

We swimmers often talk about the fact that there is no "I" in solo and it really is a team sport. In my case, it was my coach Gus Ryder, my pilot Ellice Cavin, and Jack Todd who shared in that successful crossing. In that failed first attempt, the team performed spot on and conditions were better than expected. However, I failed to do what I had trained to do: just swim.

Chadwick was a remarkable female athlete and one of my heroines. After 1954, she continued to be successful and inspire young women like me to be strong, committed to our dreams and, most importantly, disregard the naysayers.
"

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program