DNOWS Header

Image Map

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Saison 2 Of The Tahiti Swimming Experience

Courtesy of Michel Sommers, Tahiti.

Model and French Polynesia and Air Tahiti Nui Ambassador Stéphane Debaere lives in Bordeaux, France, but his roots are in swimming and his native Tahiti.

The multi-time Pacific Games medalist is also a entrepreneur who brings a large number of Olympic swimmers to Tahiti through his Tahiti Swimming Experience.

In the 1st Tahiti Swimming Experience in 2016, great swimmers like Femke Heemskerk, Sarah Sjöström, Natalie Coughlin, Florent Manaudou, Camille Lacourt, Frédérick Bosquet, Giacomo Perez Dortona and Gregory Mallet swam in Saison 1.

Debaere continued to build the brand and came up with an even bigger and more elaborate Saison 2 of the Tahiti Swimming Experience.

Between December 2nd - 8th, he will be joined by Aurélie Muller (2008 and 2016 Olympian, 2017 world 10 km gold medalist, 2017 world 5 km mixed relay gold medalist, 2015 world 10 km gold medalist, 9-time French national champion, 2015-2017 FINA World Cup stage champion), Marc-Antoine Olivier (2016 Olympic bronze medalist, 2017 world 5 km gold medalist, 2017 world 5 km mixed relay gold medalist, 2017 world 10 km bronze medalist, 2016 FINA World Cup stage champion, 5-time French national champion), Logan Fontaine (2017 world 5 km mixed team gold medalist, 2016 world junior 7.5 km gold medalist, 4-time French national champion), Camille Lacourt (2-time Olympian, 5-time world backstroke champion), Philippe Lucas (2017 FINA Open Water Swimming Coach of the Year, coach of 5 Olympic medalists, 20 world championship medalists, 49 European championship medalists and 7 world record holders) and Stéphane Lecat (10-time world open water champion and National Team Open Water Program Director and 2018 recipient of the Irving Davids/Captain Roger W. Wheeler Memorial Award) in Tahiti and Mo'orea.

Saison 2 of the Tahiti Swimming Experience includes several events, marine conservation projects, and 3 ocean swims on 3 differents courses on Tahiti and Moorea islands:

On December 3rd, a Tere Fa'ati Fatutira and Pebble Fishing will be held on Tautira, Tahiti.

On December 4th, a Fa'atau Aroha Ceremony will be held on Tahiti – Paea, Tahiti.

On December 5th, swim from Tahiti to Pointe Vénus including a 4 x 200m relay, a 5 km race and a 2 km ocean race from Mahina to Pointe Vénus.

On December 7th, swim from Mo'orea to Plage de Tema'e including a 4 x 200m relay and a 2 km and a 10 km Moz Coral Open Water Race from Haapiti to Tiahura.

On December 8th, swim from Tahiti to Ta'apuna including a 4 x 500m relay, a 2.5 km and a 5 km race.

Saison 3 of the Tahiti Swimming Experience will include a 20 km ocean swim (EDF Tour Aqua Challenge - Tahiti) from Ta'apuna on Tahiti to Plage de Temae on Moorea in October 2019.

The Tahitian Swimming Federation launched open water swimming in French Polynesia with the support of the French Swimming Federation.

Additionally, the Tahiti Swimming Experience is committed to minimizing the event's impact on the local environment and swimmers can help to preserve the marine environment more sustainably by being involved with two associations: Moorea Coral Gardeners and Nana Sac Plastique to sustainably preserve coral gardens in Polynesia. Swimmers can adopt a coral and participate in the cuttings workshop in the lagoon of Plage de Tema'e in order to participate in the largest chain of safeguarding Tahiti's coral.





Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, October 19, 2018

Mass To Make The Mackinac Crossing

Courtesy of Jim Dreyer, Michigan.

A race limited to 400 athletes to attempt an unprecedented swim between Michigan’s peninsulas across the Straits of Mackinac on August 11th 2019 is being organized by Jim Dreyer, Executive Director of the Mighty Mac Swim.

Dreyer, himself a veteran of multiple Straits of Mackinac crossings, stated the significance of 400 swimmers crossing the Straits en masse. “It was the Mighty Mac Swim which opened swimming the Straits of Mackinac to public participation back in 2007. At that time, we could not find more than 20 documented swims across the Straits. Then in our first event, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Mackinac Bridge, 50 crossed in a single day. In 2019, 400 Mighty Mac swimmers will once again pioneer its waters and become part of Straits-swimming lore.”

In recent years, the Mighty Mac Swim set its limit at 84 swimmers, but adding a 500-passenger ferry to the Mighty Mac Swim fleet prompted Dreyer to open the swim to the masses. “We will always have a safety fleet with the capacity to hold all of our swimmers. Once open to only a select few, working with Star Line Mackinac Island Ferry now allows us to safely open a challenging open water venue to the multitudes who venture for a true ‘bucket list’ experience.

The event is held as a competition, but whether or not you wish to race, everyone who meets the challenge of swimming across the Straits of Mackinac is indeed a champion. Furthermore, this epic swim follows the iconic Mackinac Bridge and the beauty of the area is stunning, making for an awe-inspiring experience
.”

For more information on the Mighty Mac Swim, visit www.MightyMacSwim.com.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Stéphane Lecat Speaks At FINA Coaches Golden Clinic




Courtesy of FINA, Hangzhou, China.

Stéphane Lecat is one of the few internationally renowned athletes who post-athletic successes as a coach and administrator are arguably even greater than his own personal athletic achievements.

The premier professional marathon swimmer in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s was the FINA World Cup Series champion in 1997, 1999 and 2000 and was inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2007). He also won the 32 km Traversée internationale du lac St-Jean in Canada in 1996, 1999, and 2000, the 57 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina in 1996, 1997, 1999 and 2000, the 42 km Traversée Internationale du Lac Memphrémagog in Canada in 1995, 1996 and 2000, the 36 km Around-the-Island Marathon Swim in USA in 2001, won 17 FINA World Cup professional races, swam the English Channel in 8 hours 19 minutes in 2003.

But he also has developed France as an open water swimming powerhouse, not only in terms of elite swimmers at the Olympics, world championships and FINA professional circuits, but also in terms of organizing events and motivating thousands of additional open water swimmers of all ages and abilities from his native France to Tahiti.

Lecat will be one of the featured speakers at the 2018 FINA Swimming Coaches Golden Clinic held in China's 5th FINA World Aquatics Convention.

We’re delighted to announce some of the biggest names in coaching for this year’s Coaches Clinic,” say FINA President, Dr Julio Maglione. “It provides a unique opportunity to meet the people responsible for guiding our stars to FINA World Championship and Olympic glory as they reveal the various ways to success.”

Lecat's presentation will be on the second day of the 4th FINA Swimming Coaches Golden Clinic on December 9th at the Intercontinental Hotel in Hangzhou, China, a highlight of the 5th FINA World Aquatics Convention.

His talk, Keys of Long-Distance Training, will be presented from his position as the French Swimming Federation Open Water Swimming Program Director where he has coached athletes at every level to medals and championship titles in 5 km, 7.5 km, 10 km and 25 km distances.

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming Near A Dangerous Stretch Of Water

Courtesy of Vigour Events, Scotland.

12 swimmers will be allowed to compete in the 1 km Corryvreckan Whirlpool Swim, a point-to-point swim off the west coast of Scotland between the islands of Jura and Scarba near the Gulf of Corryvreckan, one of the world's largest permanent whirlpools and one of the most dangerous stretches of water around the British Isles.

The swimmers will be escorted over the course that starts at Jura and ends at Scarba by the Venture West team who are experienced in trips to the Corryvreckan.

Event organizer Vigour Events says, "At certain times, the roar is so loud that it can be heard ten miles away. At full strength the currents can reach over 10 knots and produce waves over 9 meters high."

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Michelle Macy Enters International Marathon Swimming Hall Of Fame

Courtesy of Ned Denison, Chairman of the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame.

Michelle Macy's accomplishments in the open water swimming world are lengthy and were officially recognized by her peers today.

The International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame announced that Macy will be inducted as an Honor Swimmer in its Class of 2019, joining other celebrated heroes and heroines.

Her Class of 2019 includes Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli director Luciano Cotena, 2-time Olympian Thomas Lurz, multiple world champion Ana Marcela Cunha, and International Swimming Hall of Fame administrator and coachBob Duenkel.

She responded to the honor in her typically humble manner, "[I am] so incredibly honored to be even considered to join this group of swimmers, organizers and pilots. It takes so many people to make one swimmer a success. To all that have helped me, mentored me, kept me safe. This award is as much yours than mine."

The 41-year-old American marathon swimmer from Oregon began swimming at a young age and was a competitive swimmer through college. She later focused her talents on marathon and channel swimming while working at Nike as a Process Improvement Expert.

Her brand, MacySwim, is her platform for things does in and out of the water in the open water swimming space, raising over US$50,000 to date for the Masonic Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota earmarked for Breast Cancer research. “I am made for swimming. It is where I belong and where I find joy. It has allowed me to help others. This is why I swim,” she explains.

And swims she does.

* Macy was the third person in history to achieve the Oceans Seven and complete all seven of the world's major channels: English Channel, Catalina Channel, North Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, Cook Strait, Molokai Channel and Tsugaru Channel in 2013
* 7.5 km across Lake Titicaca in Chile in 12.7°C (55°F) water in Chile in 2 hours 30 minutes in 2017
* 6 km across the Bosphorus Strait from Asia to Europe in Istanbul, Turkey in 1 hour 1 minute in 2017
* 4.6 km across the Strait of Magellan in Chile in 58 minutes 13 seconds to set record in 2017
* 2 km across the Beagle Channel in 7°C water from Glacier Italia on Tierra del Fuego to Gordon Island in Chile in 33 minutes 51 seconds to set record in 2017
* 6 km Circle of Health International Awareness Swim in Monterey Bay, California in 2016
* Named one of World's 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Women by the World Open Water Swimming Association in 2015
* 28.9 km from Jersey to France in 6 hours 42 minutes to set record in 2014
* 66 km Round Jersey in Jersey Island, United Kingdom in 9 hours 29 minutes to set record in 2014
* 35 km across the North Channel from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 9 hours 34 minutes to set record in 2013
* 13.1 km in the Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 2013
* 20 km across the Santa Barbara Channel from Anacapa Island to mainland in 5 hours 29 minutes to set record in 2013
* 10.2 km double-crossing of the Columbia River Bar in Oregon in 2 hours 38 minutes, an unprecedented swim in 2013
* 7.5 km Columbia River Bar in Oregon in 1 hours 47 minutes in 2013
* nominated for the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year award
* 33.8 km across the English Channel from England to France in 10 hours 35 minutes in 2012
* 19.7 km across the Tsugaru Channel from Honshu to Hokkaido, Japan in 8 hours 55 minutes to set record in 2012
* EPIC 5 Challenge – 5 Ironman triathlons in 5 days on 5 different Hawaiian islands with Team Nike Relay in Hawaii in 2011
* 14.4 km across the Strait of Gibraltar from Spain to Morocco in 3 hours 39 minutes in 2011
* 17.7 km Portland Bridge Swim in Oregon in 2011
* 13.1 km in the Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 2011
* 10 km Karen Gaffney Columbia River Swim and Cruise for Kids in Oregon in 2011
* 42 km Molokai Channel from Molokai Island to Oahu in Hawaii in 14 hours 12 minutes in 2011
* Created the Stillwater 8 Challenge: lake swims in Loch Ness, Windermere, Lake Zurich, Lake Tahoe, Lake Baikal, Lake Taupo, Lake Ontario, Lake Titicaca in 2011
* 29 km across the Cook Strait in New Zealand in 8 hours 2 minutes in 2010
* 23.3 km across the Clarence Strait in Ketchikan, Alaska in 6 hours 46 minutes, an unprecedented swim in 2010
* 17.7 km Portland Bridge Swim in Oregon in 2010
* 13.1 km in the Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 2010
* 40.2 km Monterey Bay Relay swim in Santa Cruz, California in 2010
* 115.8 km Kaieiewaho Channel Relay from Oahu to Kauai in Hawaii in 47 hours 55 minutes with Mike Spalding, Linda Kaiser, Joel Schwartz, Randy Brown, Billy Brown in 2010, an unprecedented and unreplicated crossing in 2010
* 120 km Lake Taupo Triple Relay Crossing in Taupo, New Zealand in 33 hours 33 minutes 54 seconds with Barbara Pellick, Penny Palfrey, Julie Bradshaw, Heather Osbourne, and Lucy Roeper in 2009
* 33.8 km across the English Channel from England to France in 11 hours 37 minutes in 2009
* 13.1 km Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 2009
* 40.2 km Monterey Bay Relay swim in Santa Cruz, California in 2009
* 45.9 km Manhattan Island Marathon Swim around New York City in 7 hours 55 minutes in 2008
* 12.8 km Boston Light Swim in 2 hours 47 minutes as 1st female in * 13.1 km Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 3 hours 31 minutes in 2008
* 3.2 km Alcatraz Challenge in San Francisco, California in 2008
* 32.3 km across the Catalina Channel from Santa Catalina Island to the mainland in 10 hours 12 minutes in 2008
* 1.5-mile Alcatraz Sharkfest Swim in San Francisco, California in 2007
* 13.1 km Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 2007
* 33.8 km across the English Channel from England to France in 10 hours 2 minutes, fastest American for the Channel Swimming Association in 2007
* 8 km Lake Minnetonka Challenge in Minnesota in 2006
* 13.1 km Pennock Island Challenge in Alaska in 2006

Steven Munatones wrote her nomination for the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year award, "Her love of the sport knows no limits, she serves as support crew as readily as she dives in the water for her own marathon swims. Michelle was the first American and third person overall to achieve the Oceans Seven. The full-time Nike employee takes enough time out of her busy work schedule to become one of the most prolific and accomplished open water swimmers in contemporary times. Without sponsors and without hype, the friendly, thoughtful, seriously-minded swimmer moves about the globe to cross channels and help others in their own quests. For her world record time across the North Channel, for her achievement of the Oceans Seven, for her joyful willingness to crew for other swimmers around the world, Michelle Macy is a worthy nominee for the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year."

It is well-deservedly so that Macy is now entered into the pantheon of her marathon swimming peers.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Navarino Challenge 2018

Courtesy of Elias_Lefas, Costa Navarino, Greece.

People from 36 countries competed in the Navarino Challenge that took place in Costa Navarino for the 6th consecutive year on October 13th while promoting the fight against childhood obesity through exercise and the Mediterranean diet.

The 2.8 km race in Navarino Bay was overseen by Greek national team coach Nikos Gemelos and included elite swimmers like George Arniakos, Dimitris Negris, Dejan Jovanovic, Anastasia Kyrili, Stellina Aplanti, Konstantinos Konstantineskou, Maria Kirykou, George Skotadis, and Timos Skotadis. The swimming action marked the the 191-year anniversary of the Battle of Navarino.

Full results from the Global Swim Series event are posted here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Unlikely 10K Surprises On Land Or In The Open Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Odaiba Marine Park, Tokyo.

For those who remember the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, the 10,000m gold medal run of Billy Mills is still considered one of the greatest individual efforts in Olympic history. Odds are that there will be a Billy Mills-like swimmer who will emerge in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, 2024 Paris Olympics or the 2028 Los Angeles Olympics.

Mills was raised in South Dakota and orphaned at 12 years old. A Native American of the Oglala Lakota Sioux tribe, his given Lakota name is Makata Taka Hela which means "love your country" or more traditionally translated, "respects the earth". Although he was a 3-time NCAA All-American cross-country runner and considered to be an excellent domestic runner who qualified second in the U.S. Olympic Trials, he was not considered to be an Olympic medal contender by anyone’s stretch of imagination.

Especially since no American had ever won the 10,000-meter run before – and no other American has done since.

The overwhelming 10,000m run favorite was Australia’s Ron Clarke who held the world record and would eventually set 12 world records in his illustrious career. The other medal contenders were the Russian defending champion and the 1960 5000-meter run Olympic champion. Mills was easily an afterthought, if he was thought about at all. But, like all true heroes, he knew in his heart what his goals were.

In front of a partisan Japanese crowd, Clarke set the pace early on and picked up the pace every other lap. By the 5,000m mark, the lead pack included four runners: Clarke, a Tunisian, an Ethiopian, a Japanese and Mills. As the race progressed, the Ethiopian and the Japanese fell off the pace. With 800 meters to go, Clarke was in control with only Tunisia’s Gammoudi and Mills hanging on. While Clark held the world record in 28:15, Gammoudi and Mills had never run faster than 29 minutes. The gold medal appeared to be Clarke’s for the asking.

At the bell lap, Mills and Clark were running together with Gammoudi right at their heels as they lapped the slower runners. As 10 km marathon swimmers can appreciate, the men were sprinting while fighting for position as Clarke was boxed in. Mills was in a great position down the backstretch, but then Gammoudi pushed them both and surged into the lead as they rounded the final curve. Mills appeared to be out of the running for the gold as they rounded the final curve. Clarke recovered as they weaved in and out of a mass of slower runners. It was to be a final sprint between Clarke and Gammoudi while Mills appeared to be too far back to be in contention. Incredibly, As Clarke failed to catch Gammoudi, Mills sprinted past them both, with an incredible spurt of energy and speed. With a kick that will forever remembered in Olympic track history, Mills won in 28:24, almost 50 seconds faster than he had ever run before.

"There is a modern-day Mills in the Olympic marathon swimming future," predicts Steven Munatones. "Maarten van der Weijden was the unlikely victor in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in Beijing in 2008 and there will be other unexpected medalists in open water swimming's future."

Hollywood recreated Billy Mills’ feat when actor Robby Benson starred in the 1984 film Running Brave:



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Lifetime Of Swimming, Sharing, Smiling And Strength

Photos courtesy of Shawn Benjamin, Cape Town, South Africa.

Vineyard Swimming Club wrote that 60-year-old Theodore Yach passed away yesterday. "A wonderful man, entrepreneur, protector of the oceans, developer of Cape Town inner city, supporter of Vineyard Swimming Club...long distance swimmer Theodore Yach passed away yesterday [on] 17th October from complications related to pneumonia."

His brother Derek Yach wrote, "Seems he had a chest infection; did the Waterfront swim; felt he needed antibiotics- his doctor had him hospitalized where he died."

The shock of the larger-than-life South African's unexpected passing is quickly reverberating through his local community and the global open water swimming community well beyond the shores of Cape Town. Dr. Tim Noakes told the Sunday Times that Yach’s death was a great tragedy. “He was a remarkable man and his swimming achievements were exceptional. He was just a lovely guy‚ he was always positive‚ always gentle‚ always looking on the good side of life. He was a great leader‚ a great person."

The Cape Long Distance Swimming Association reported, "Yach was undergoing routine tests for an asthma complaint when he collapsed and died in hospital on Wednesday. Theodore is a veteran of 108 Robben Island swims‚ an English Channel swim and many other international distance swims. He will be remembered as a humble gentleman who loved motivating the youth to achieve their dreams. He was a friend to all and took interest in all swimmers who shared his passion for sea swimming.

[He was] a true gentleman who stood up for what was right [and] will be missed in the Cape Town."

His most renowned open water swimming achievement was completing an unprecedented Century Swim (100th crossing) between Robben Island and the shoreline in Cape Town that began in November 1981. 34 years later, he pioneered the Century Swim (100th crossing) in 3 hours 10 minutes in 13-14ºC (53-55ºF) waters from Robben Island at the age of 58.

He would go on to complete 8 more crossings - that ranged between 7.4 and 10.2 km depending on what Robben Island course he took - before his unexpected passing.



In March 2016, Yach was accompanied by six other swimmer friends - Toni Enderli, Kieron Palframan, Ryan Stramrood, Mark De Klerk, Buff van Westenbrugge and Dean Noik - along the 10.2 km route from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay, battling strong currents and the ubiquitous threat of Great White Sharks. When they walked up on shore, they were joined the hundreds of spectators at Three Anchor Bay beach in celebration of Yach's record.

Back in 1981, swimming from Robben Island was not a goal or an achievement well-known among the global community of open water swimmers. But over the three decades, the sport - especially within South Africa - has tremendously changed and the Robben Island crossing had become an international attraction that demanded grit and an acclimatization to the cold.

During the three decades of increasing popularity, there has been one constant: Yach's crossings from Robben Island. Sometimes he swam the shorter 7.4 km route from Robben Island to Blouberg; sometimes, he swam the longer 10.2 km route from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay.

He was honored by the City of Cape Town that offered Yach their full support in recognition of his service to the city over his successful business career.

Calm and composed as usual with a big broad smile, Yach emerged from the cold water to describe his Century Swim, “I am so relieved to have finally accomplished this milestone and to have the amazing support of everyone on the beach. I feel truly blessed from the love and support of my family, friends and the Cape Town community.”

He always believed strongly that his swims had to make a difference and had supported six charities by raising funds in the name of his 100th Robben Island Crossing. The charities included The Children’s Hospital Trust, Paper Video, NSRI Water wise Project, Wynberg Boys’ Schools Aquatic centre, Highlands House and the The Herzlia Foundation Trust.

Ricardo Mackenzie MPP, Democratic Alliance member of the Provincial Parliament and Chairperson of Premier Committee and Chairperson of Cultural Affairs and Sport, gave tribute to Yach's decades-long efforts to continue challenging himself while raising money for others. "It is important to recognise the achievements of Theodore Yach. He encourages young sporting enthusiasts to put their talents to use and make a meaningful contribution in their communities and lives. We strongly believe that our youth need role models they can aspire to. The late great Nelson Mandela is often quoted as saying, 'It (sport) has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair.'

We share Mr Mandela’s sentiments and believe that sport in our society means more than just playing a game, but highlights endless possibilities. Possibility to change one's circumstances and the possibility to unite otherwise divided societies. We therefore urge our youth to invest their time in sports and contribute to nation building
."

Century Swim List:
#1 on 25 November 1981 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 1 hours 54 minutes #2 on 31 October 1987 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 24 minutes
#3 on 5 March 1988 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 27 minutes
#4 on 12 May 1988 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 2 hours 54 minutes
#5 on 22 December 1988 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay (two-way) in 6 hours 53 minutes
#6 on 22 December 1988 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay (two-way) in 6 hours 53 minutes
#7 on 2 June 1991 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 19 minutes
#8 on 23 February 1993 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 21 minutes
#9 on 14 August 1993 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 19 minutes
#10 on 7 May1994 from Camps Bay to Robben Island in 5 hours 30 minutes
#11 on 14 May 1995 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 14 minutes
#12 on 17 February 1996 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 54 minutes
#13 on 19 May 1996 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 2 hours 58 minutes
#14 on 20 December 1997 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 4 hours 17 minutes
#15 on 22 February 1998 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 18 minutes
#16 on 1 May 1998 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 33 minutes
#17 on 3 October 1998 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 26 minutes
#18 on 2 January 1999 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 17 minutes
#19 on 1 May 1999 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 15 minutes
#20 on 6 November 1999 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 33 minutes
#21 on 18 November 1999 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 10 minutes
#22 on 30 December 1999 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 33 minutes
#23 on 10 June 2000 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 31 minutes
#24 on 14 October 2000 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 20 minutes
#25 on 3 March 2001 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 38 minutes
#26 on 1 May 2001 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 42 minutes
#27 on 18 May 2001 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 22 minutes
#28 on 16 June 2001 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 4 hours 1 minutes
#29 on 23 September 2001 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 3 hours 9 minutes
#30 on 2 March 2002 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 12 minutes
#31 on 11 May 2002 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 18 minutes
#32 on 2 June 2002 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 36 minutes
#33 on 30 December 2002 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 4 hours 19 minutes
#34 on 1 March 2003 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 23 minutes
#35 on 26 April 2003 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 20 minutes
#36 on 31 May 2003 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 16 minutes
#37 on 19 October 2003 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 2 hours 59 minutes
#38 on 30 November 2003 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 13 minutes
#39 on 27 March 2004 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 3 minutes
#40 on 14 April 2004 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 33 minutes
#41 on 30 January 2005 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 2 hours 44 minutes
#42 on 11 September 2005 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 33 minutes
#43 on 18 February 2006 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 38 minutes
#44 on 5 March 2006 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 5 minutes
#45 on 12 May 2006 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 22 minutes
#46 on 5 January 2007 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 15 minutes
#47 on 17 February 2007 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 21 minutes
#48 on 31 March 2007 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 22 minutes
#49 on 1 May 2007 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 14 minutes
#50 on 4 April 2008 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 5 minutes
#51 on 27 April 2008 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 54 minutes
#52 on 28 September 2008 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 43 minutes
#53 on 26 April 2009 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 17 minutes
#54 on 28 November 2009 from Three Anchor Bay to Round Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay (two-way) in 10 hours 39 minutes
#55 on 28 November 2009 from Three Anchor Bay to Round Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay (two-way) in 10 hours 39 minutes
#56 on 2 May 2010 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 51 minutes
#57 on 4 December 2010 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 17 minutes
#58 on 18 December 2010 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 2 hours 58 minutes
#59 on 13 February 2011 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 26 minutes
#60 on 19 March 2011 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 2 hours 49 minutes
#61 on 25 August 2011 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 45 minutes
#62 on 25 September 2011 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 36 minutes
#63 on 29 January 2012 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 33 minutes
#64 on 18 March 2012 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 40 minutes
#65 on 29 July 2012 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 3 hours 27 minutes
#66 on 16 September 2012 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 27 minutes
#67 on 2 October 2012 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 26 minutes
#68 on 15 December 2012 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 33 minutes
#69 on 17 February 2013 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 2 hours 45 minutes
#70 on 6 March 2013 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 29 minutes
#71 on 11 May 2013 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 40 minutes
#72 on 17 June 2013 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 35 minutes
#73 on 10 July 2013 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 3 hours 4 minutes
#74 on 2 October 2013 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 19 minutes
#75 on 3 November 2013 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 3 hours 47 minutes
#76 on 24 November 2013 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 22 minutes
#77 on 27 December 2013 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 4 hours 20 minutes
#78 on 26 2014 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 24 minutes
#79 on 1 March 2014 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 30 minutes
#80 on 29 March 2014 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 13 minutes
#81 on 8 April 2014 from Llandudno to Robben Island in 7 hours 3 minutes
#82 on 28 June 2014 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 14 minutes
#83 on 30 July 2014 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 31 minutes
#84 on 17 August 2014 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 40 minutes
#85 on 7 November 2014 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 17 minutes
#86 on 29 November 2014 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 3 hours 52 minutes
#87 on 1 January 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 20 minutes
#88 on 24 January 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 30 minutes
#89 on 15 March 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 8 minutes
#90 on 30 March 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 21 minutes
#91 on 12 April 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 15 minutes
#92 on 17 May 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 30 minutes
#93 on 20 June 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 34 minutes
#94 on 9 October 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 43 minutes
#95 on 22 November 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg on 2 hours 0 minutes
#96 on 6 December 2015 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 1 hour 59 minutes
#97 on 17 December 2015 from Three Anchor Bay to Robben Island in 4 hours 36 minutes
#98 16 January 2016 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 26 minutes
#99 13 February 2016 from Robben Island to Blouberg in 2 hours 40 minutes
#100 22 March 2016 from Robben Island to Three Anchor Bay in 3 hours 10 minutes



"Yach is the most successful and consistent endurance swimmer South Africa has ever produced," said fellow Cape Town swimmer Lewis Pugh. "Not only he did he undertake his first crossing 35 years ago, but a majority of his swims were the long Robben Island crossings between the island and 3 Anchor Bay which are always tough and cold. By way of comparison, the next most successful Robben Island swimmer has done 52 crossings.

The swim to Robben Island from Cape Town combines everything we love about these endeavours - cold water, sometimes wild seas, difficult currents, interesting sea life and an overall beauty that rivals most other swim spots around the world
."

Besides his success in business and in the open water, Yach wrote a fascinating book called In My Element, an insider's look at the sport of open water swimming with an outstanding mix of beautiful photography, explanatory text, and personal insights. Set within the backdrop of the wild waters off the South African coast, Yach tackles myriad subjects of the open water swimming with an intense passion that can only come from first-hand experiences with cold, sharks, tides, currents, jellyfish and thoroughly inhospitable conditions in the open ocean.

"I have only experienced hypothermia twice out of over 100 ‘cold water swims'. The first time in 2010 when I joined Ram Barkai and company to become the first six folk in the world to swim a mile in under 3°C in a frozen dam in the Northern Cape. I wanted to test myself. It took the medical team approximately an hour to revive me. My core temp dropped to 28.5°C – 15 minutes after I exited the water.

The second time was in 2012 when swimming from Robben Island to Blouberg the temperature dropped from 10.5°C to 8.5°C at the 1 hour 22 minute point. I actually told the crew that I thought the water had warmed up. In both cases, the combination of my own cognitive processes coupled with superb backup on the boats intervened to rescue me. In my view, the crew’s expertise is more important than the swimmers.
"

He once explained about how he gets through the tough times in the ocean. "Cold adaptation is critical. I still go through my boring cold adaptation processes today after 35 years of cold water sea swims. Secondly, I never compromise on boat crews. If I don’t trust my boat crew and if they do not have the requisite experience, I don’t get in. Hypothermia is insidious so there are times when swimmers are not aware of the trouble they are in and the crew do not pick up the signs.

Thirdly, I have certain goals that I want to achieve with my swims. I have raised much money for various charities plus there are several swims that I want to achieve in and out of South Africa. It is very important for me to goal set. And finally – and I don’t apologise for how this sounds - I am inspired by the feats of the great marathon swimmers around the world. That is a big driver
."

"Theodore is truly a role model in the open water swimming world," says Steven Munatones. "He not only has helped others in the sport and organized local swims, but he also raises lots of money and awareness through his unprecedented charity swims. And of course he is best known as the King of Robben Island with his unprecedented number of crossings between the former prison island and the mainland around Cape Town.

Just doing it once is an achievement - doing it 108 times is very special and may never be replicated. His sharing, smiles and strength of character will be long remembered by everyone who he met and supported.
."

In 2012, his book In My Element was nominated as the World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

In My Element is a colorful, entertaining explosion of open water swimming exuberance packaged in 163 pages. The hardcover self-published book is an outstanding mix of beautiful photography, explanatory text, and personal insights by a uber-tough swimmer from Cape Town. Set in the backdrop of the wild waters off the South African coast, Yach tackles myriad subjects of the open water swimming with an intense passion that can only come from first-hand experiences with cold, sharks, tides, currents, jellyfish and thoroughly inhospitable conditions in the open ocean.

Munatones sums up his impressions of the book, "His ability to describe the scenes and challenges of the open water world with childlike wonder, punctuated with gorgeous photography, is a page-by-page joy to savor over and over again."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Marathon Swimming: The Sport of the Soul By Paul Asmuth

Courtesy of Elm Hill.

International Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2010) and International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 1982) dual inductee Paul Asmuth wrote his first book like he swam as a professional marathon swimmer: with passion, faith, and grit.

His book, Marathon Swimming: The Sport of the Soul, was released today by Elm Hill, a division of HarperCollins Christian Publishing.

Asmuth introduces readers to the journey of his prolific marathon swimming career that took him to races in the Pacific Ocean in Mexico, lakes in Quebec, Canada, in the Italian waters of the Mediterranean Sea, around Manhattan Island in New York City, and three times across the English Channel (8 hours 12 minutes and 8 hours 34 minutes in 1985 and 9 hours 5 minutes in 1989).

He recognizes the guidance of God and the people who helped him attain his achievements in his many victories including the 42 km Traversée Internationale du lac Memphrémagog, the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean, the 45.9 km Manhattan Island Marathon Swim, the 36.2 km Atlantic City Around the Island Swim, and the 36 Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli, .

Throughout the book, Asmuth recounts many memorable races in some of the world’s toughest marathon races. “The story of my marathon swimming journey is how the hand of God directed me throughout my life, to put me in the right place and, more importantly, with the right coaches and teammates who would build my mind, body, and spiritual path to achieve great success, as improbable as this was in my early days.

Looking back on life, it is easy to see how the decisions we made impacted our future. For me, the links between these choices have been Divine inspirations and appointments. Without my belief that God has a plan for my life, the odds of success seem very low
.”

Asmuth describes the doubts, uncertainties and struggles with the cold, currents and conditions that he had to overcome in his races to succeed. The three-time NCAA All-American swimmer and team co-captain at Arizona State University had his dreams of competing in the Olympics dashed by the 1980 boycott. But that disappointment ultimately led him to showcase his swimming prowess on the World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation where he was the dominant swimmer throughout the 1980's while working as a California Certified Public Accountant.

Asmuth has long retired from accounting, but shared his knowledge of the sport while coaching the USA Swimming national team between 2007 and 2016. He currently serves as the general manager of The Napa Valley Reserve, a private winery and club in St. Helena, California.

Elm Hill describes Marathon Swimming: The Sport of the Soul as a chronicle of Asmuth’s rich experience in his swimming career and spiritual journey. The Sport of the Soul refers to how marathon swimming diminishes all five senses — hear, feel, touch, smell, and sight — where he is moved deeper into his soul to the very essence of who he is and who God has made him to be.

The 244-page Marathon Swimming: The Sport of the Soul is available in eBook, paperback and hardbound formats.

The book was posted today on Amazon and Barnes and Noble for pre-ordering.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Barbara Pozzobon Wins FINA Ultramarathon Swim Series

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

24-year-old Barbara Pozzobon was the dominant swimmer on the 2018 FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series. The swimmer representing the Italian Polizia won her second consecutive series title.

On February 4th, Pozzobon finished second in the 57 km FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series race in Santa Fe - Coronda, Argentina:

Santa Fe - Coronda Top 3 Women:
1. Cecilia Biagioli 7 hours 33 minutes 47.70 seconds
2. Barbara Pozzobon 7 hours 42 minutes 38.54 seconds
3. Alice Franco 7 hours 44 minutes 33.48 seconds

On July 28th, Pozzobon won the second FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series 32 km race in lac St-Jean in Canada:

Lac St-Jean Top 3 Women:
1. Barbara Pozzobon 7 hours 35 minutes 20.6 seconds
2. Morgane Dornic 7 hours 35 minutes 39.8 seconds
3. Pilar Geijo 7 hours 55 minutes 22.0 seconds

On August 25th, Pozzobon won the season-ending 25 km FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series race in Lake Ohrid, Macedonia:

Lake Ohrid Top 3 Women:
1. Barbara Pozzobon 5 hours 22 minutes 59.30 seconds
2. Anna Olasz 5 hours 23 minutes 3.18 seconds
3. Alice Franco 5 hours 23 minutes 56.46 seconds

2018 FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series Rankings:
1. Barbara Pozzobon (Italy) 51 points
2. Alice Franco (Italy) 31 points
3. Pilar Geijo (Argentina) 26 points
4. Cecilia Biagioli (Argentina) 22 points
5. Morgane Dornic (France) 19 points
6. Daria Kulik (Russia) 13 points
7. Anna Olasz (Hungary) 11 points
7. Rita Vanesa Garcia (Argentina) 11 points
7. Sabryna Lavoie (Canada) 11 points
10. Daira Marin (Argentina) 9 points
10. Marie-Laurence Lortie (Canada) 9 points
12. Erika Yenssen (Argentina) 8 points
13. Anna Mankevich (Russia) 5 points
14. Romina Imwinkelried (Argentina) 4 points
15. Vasiliki Kadoglu (Bulgaria) 3 points

She finished her 2018 marathon swimming season by winning the 36 km Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli in 7 hours 19 minutes on September 9th:



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Edoardo Stochino Wins FINA Ultramarathon Swim Series

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

31-year-old veteran professional marathon swimmer Edoardo Stochino who swims for the Polizia of Italy won his second career FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series title by finishing in the top 3 in all three races including the 57 km race in Argentina, the 32 km race in Canada, and the 25 km race in Macedonia.

On February 4th, Stochino finished second in the first FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series 57 km race in Coronda-Santa Fe, Argentina:

Santa Fe - Coronda Top 3 Men:
1. Guillermo Bértola 7 hours 32 minutes 18.9 seconds
2. Edoardo Stochino 7 hours 34 minutes 33.50 seconds
3. Simone Ercoli 7 hours 34 minutes 36.72 seconds

On July 28th, Stochino won the second FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series 32 km race in lac St-Jean in Canada:

Lac St-Jean Top 3 Men:
1. Edoardo Stochino 7 hours 10 minutes 52.7 seconds
2. Xavier Desharnais 7 hours 10 minutes 53.40 seconds
3. Alexander Studzinski 7 hours 10 minutes 59.00 seconds

On August 25th, Stochino finished second in the season-ending FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series 25 km race in Lake Ohrid, Macedonia to wrap up his title:

Lake Ohrid Top 3 Men:
1. Francesco Ghettini 5 hours 13 minutes 59.62 seconds
2. Edoardo Stochino 5 hours 14 minutes 10.72 seconds
3. Andrea Bianchi 5 hours 14 minutes 11.69 seconds

2018 FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series Rankings:
1. Edoardo Stochino (Italy) 47 points
2. Guillermo Bértola (Argentina) 29 points
3. Evgenij Pop Acev (Macedonia) 24 points
4. Alexander Studzinski (Germany) 23 points
5. Xavier Desharnais (Canada) 21 points
6. Francesco Ghettini (Italy) 15 points
8. Santiago Enderica (Ecuador) 12 points
8. Aquiles Balaudo (Argentina) 12 points
9. Edouard Lehoux (France) 11 points
10. Joaquin Moreno (Argentina) 10 points
11. Andrea Bianchi (Italy) 9 points
11. Simone Ercoli (Italy) 9 points
11. Aleksandar Ilievski (Macedonia) 9 points
14. Damian Blaum (Argentina) 7 points
14. Chris Deegan (Australia) 7 points
16. Luciano Segurado (Argentina) 6 points
17. Gabriel Pouliot (Canada) 4 points
18. Artur Pedroza (Brazil) 2 points
18. Matias Diaz Hernandez (Argentina) 2 points
18. Arseny Beketov (Bulgaria) 2 points
18. Matias Aguirre (Argentina) 2 points
18. Saleh Mohammad (Syria) 2 points
18. Fausto Emanuel Fausto (Argentina) 2 points
18. Jose Ignacio Ravagna (Argentina) 2 points

His Polizia teammate, Barbara Pozzobon [shown above], won the women's title on the 2018 FINA UltraMarathon Swim Series.

Stochino finished his 2018 marathon swimming season by finishing fourth in the 36 km Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli in 7 hours 1 minute on September 9th:

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Ferry Weertman Leads FINA World Rankings

Courtesy of WOWSA, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Ferry Weertman is leading the rankings in the 2018 FINA/HOSA Marathon Swim World Series heading into the season-culminating race in the United Arab Emirates.

His lead - 78 points to 62 points for second-place Jack Burnell and third-place Simone Ruffini, the 2017 series champion, seems to be a reasonably comfortable cushion to win his first World Series title.

After races in Doha in Qatar, Victoria in Seychelles, Setúbal in Portugal, Balatonfüred in Hungary, lac St-Jean and lac Mégantic in Canada, Chun'an in China, the world's fastest open water swimmer will be headed to Abu Dhabi in November for the season-culminating race in the United Arab Emirates.

Rankings after 7 of 8 Races:
1. Ferry Weertman (Netherlands) 78 points
2. Jack Burnell (Great Britain) 62 points
3. Simone Ruffini (Italy) 55 points
4. Marcel Schouten (Netherlands) 51 points
5. Matteo Furlan (Italy) 50 points
6. Fernando Ponte (Brazil) 44 points
7. Rob Muffels (Germany) 42 points
8. Kristof Rasovszky (Hungary) 38 points
9. Axel Reymond (France) 30 points
9. Mario Sanzullo (Italy) 30 points
11. Gregorio Paltrinieri (Italy) 28 points
11. Christian Reichert (Germany) 28 points
13. Diogo Villarinho (Brazil) 26 points
13. Allan do Carmo (Brazil) 26 points
15. Tobias Patrick Robinson (Great Britain) 22 points
16. Florian Wellbrock (Germany) 20 points
16. Alexandre Finco (Brazil) 20 points
16. Dario Verani (Italy) 20 points
16. Luiz Gustavo Barros (Brazil) 20 points
20. David Aubry (France) 18 points
20. Andrea Manzi (Italy) 18 points
22. Andreas Waschburger (Germany) 16 points
23. Nicholas James Sloman (Australia) 15 points
24. Soren Detlef Meissner (Germany) 14 points
25. Pepijn Smits (Netherlands) 12 points
25. Vitaliy Khudyakov (Kazakhstan) 12 points
25. Alexander Studzinski (Germany) 12 points
25. Victor Hugo Ribeiro Colonese (Brazil) 12 points
30. Elliot Sodemann (Sweden) 11 points
31. Kenessary Kenenbayev (Kazakhstan) 10 points
31. Nicolas Masse-Savard (Canada) 10 points
32. Matan Roditi (Israel)8 points
32. Esteban Enderica (Ecuador) 8 points
32. Matheus Evangelista (Brazil) 8 points
32. Xavier Desharnais (Brazil) 8 points
36. Alberto Martinez Murcia (Spain) 6 points
36. Simon Huitenga (Australia) 6 points
36. Oliver Signorini (Australia) 6 points
36. Bailey Armstrong (Australia) 6 points
36. David Brandl (Austria) 6 points
36. Christopher Jedel (Sweden) 6 points
36. Jiabao An (China) 6 points
36. Marcus Herwig (Germany) 6 points
36. Evgenij Pop Acev (Macedonia) 6 points
36. Long Cheng (China) 6 points
36. Yunze Wang (China) 6 points
36. Aquiles Balaudo (Argentina) 6 points
48. Yasunari Hirai (Japan) 5 points
48. Jon McKey (Canada) 5 points
50. Logan Fontaine (France) 4 points
50. Krzysztof Piekowski (Poland) 4 points
50. Taiki Nonaka (Japan) 4 points
50. Arti Krasniqi (Germany) 4 points
50. Kaito Watanuki (Japan) 4 points
50. Hau-Li Fan (Canada) 4 points
50. Taishin Minemide (Japan) 4 points
50. Yosuke Aoki (Japan) 4 points
50. Yuval Safra (Israel) 4 points
50. Nicholas Rollo (Australia) 4 points
50. Shai Toledano (Israel) 4 points
50. Jose Carvalho (Portugal) 4 points
50. Marwan Elamrawy (Egypt) 4 points
50. Shuyi Liu (China) 4 points
50. Abdelrahman Mohamed (Qatar) 4 points
50. David Pouliot (Canada) 4 points
50. Edouard Belanger 4 points
68. Kai Edwards (Australia) 3 points
69. Victor Johansson (Sweden) 2 points
69. Aubin Coccordano (France) 2 points
69. Clement Raymond Batte (France) 2 points
69. Alexis Leon Vandevelde (France) 2 points
69. Enzo Roldan Munoz (France) 2 points
69. Caleb Hughes (Great Britain) 2 points
69. Gaspar Andrade Budino (Spain) 2 points
69. Jean-Baptiste Clusman (France) 2 points
69. Maim Mokhfi (France) 2 points
69. Hugo Frederic Saillard (France) 2 points
69. Baptiste Colmant (France) 2 points
69. Clement Jean Kukla (France) 2 points
69. Pablo Le Corre (France) 2 points
69. Dimitrios Negris (Greece) 2 points
69. Fares Zitouni (France) 2 points
69. Jules Laurent Wallart (France) 2 points
69. Eric Hedlin (Canada) 2 points
69. Lijun Zu (China) 2 points
69. David Farinango (Ecuador) 2 points
69. Marin Remy Debril (France) 2 points
69. Aiman AL Qasmi (Oman) 2 points
69. Leo Ouaabdesselam (France) 2 points
69. Damien Payet (Seychelles) 2 points
69. Bertrand Payet (Seychelles) 2 points
69. Chad Ho (South Africa) 2 points
69. Ruwen Straub (Germany) 2 points
69. Raul Santiago Betancor (Spain) 2 points
69. Brendan Casey (USA) 2 points
69. David Heron (Australia) 2 points
69. Igor Chervynskiy (Ukraine) 2 points
69. Pol Gil Tarazona (Spain) 2 points
69. Tiago Campos (Portugal) 2 points
69. Ventsislav Aydarski (Bulgaria) 2 points
69. Yohsuke Miyamoto (Japan) 2 points
69. Rafael Gil (Portugal) 2 points
69. Matthew Scott (New Zealand) 2 points
69. David Huszti (Hungary) 2 points
69. Daniel Szekelyi (Hungary) 2 points
69. Shahar Resman (Israel) 2 points
69. Matej Kozubek (Czech Republic) 2 points
69. Peter Galicz (Hungary) 2 points
69. Zoltan Drigan (Hungary) 2 points
69. Levente Selmeci (Hungary) 2 points
69. Mark Papp (Hungary) 2 points
69. Takeshi Toyoda (Japan) 2 points
69. Noel Novoszath (Hungary) 2 points
69. Ido Gal (Israel) 2 points
69. Tamas Farkas (Serbia) 2 points
69. Vit Ingeduld (Czech Republic) 2 points
69. Balaudo Aquiles (Argentina) 2 points
69. Ivan Fratic (Slovakia) 2 points
69. Balazs Hollo (Hungary) 2 points
69. Kristof Monori (Hungary) 2 points
69. Adam Laszlo (Hungary) 2 points
69. Aleksandar Ilievski (Macedonia) 2 points
69. Akos Suli (Hungary) 2 points
69. Joaquin Moreno Munoz (Argentina) 2 points
69. Edouard Lehoux (France) 2 points
69. Chris Deegan (Australia) 2 points
69. Jia Hu (China) 2 points
69. Maxime Gagnon (Canada) 2 points
69. Zhong Yi Qiao (China) 2 points
69. Hayden Cotter (Australia) 2 points
69. James Otley-Doe (Australia) 2 points
69. William Yan Thorley (Hong Kong) 2 points
69. Lu Peng Liu (China) 2 points
69. Kennedy (Australia) 2 points
69. Zi Yang Zhang (China) 2 points
69. Jun Bo Hang Zhao (China) 2 points
69. Wei Jun Su (China) 2 points
69. Zi Ce Pei (China) 2 points
69. Suebsakul Kumton (Thailand) 2 points
69. Chan Ting Keith Sin (Hong Kong) 2 points
69. Nattapon Intararchaikij (Thailand) 2 points
69. Chak Fung Lam (Hong Kong) 2 points
69. Chun Hin Hui (Hong Kong) 2 points
69. Siwat Matangkapong (Thailand) 2 points
69. Abdulaziz Al-Odaidly (Qatar) 0 points

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Ana Marcela Cunha Leading FINA World Rankings

Courtesy of WOWSA, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Ana Marcela Cunha, recently inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, only has to finish in the top pack and earn a single point to win the 2018 FINA/HOSA Marathon Swim World Series.

Cunha has a commanding lead - 96 points to 66 points for second-place Sharon van Rouwendaal of the Netherlands and Rachele Bruni of Italy.

After races in Doha in Qatar, Victoria in Seychelles, Setúbal in Portugal, Balatonfüred in Hungary, lac St-Jean and lac Mégantic in Canada, Chun'an in China, the world's fastest open water swimmer will be headed to Abu Dhabi in November for the season-culminating race in the United Arab Emirates.

Rankings after 7 of 8 Races:
1. Ana Marcela Cunha (Brazil) 96 points
2. Sharon van Rouwendaal (Netherlands) 66 points
2. Rachele Bruni (Italy) 66 points
4. Leonie Beck (Germany) 62 points
5. Finnia Wunram (Germany) 52 points
6. Xin Xin (China) 52 points
7. Samantha Arévalo Salinas (Ecuador) 41 points
8. Haley Anderson (USA) 38 points
9. Viviane Jungblut (Brazil) 35 points
10. Martina de Memme (Italy) 34 points
11. Arianna Bridi (Italy) 30 points
12. Kareena Lee (Australia) 30 points
13. Svenja Zihsler (Germany) 28 points
14. Giulia Gabbrielleschi (Italy) 25 points
15. Stephanie Horner (Canada) 18 points
16. Caroline Laure Jouisse (France) 17 points
17. Sarah Bosslet (Germany) 16 points
18. Chelsea Lea Gubecka (Australia) 14 points
18. Muran Tian (China) 14 points
18. Lea Boy (Germany) 14 points
18. Maria Alejandra Bramont-Arias (Peru) 14 points
18. Rebecca Mann (USA) 14 points
23. Julia Arino (Argentina) 12 points
24. Angela Maurer (Germany) 10 points
24. Angelica Ribeiro Andre (Portugal) 10 points
24. Anna Olasz (Hungary) 10 points
27. Nataly Caldas Calle (Ecuador) 8 points
28. Romina Soledad Imwinkelried (Argentina) 7 points
29. Oceane Maryse Cassignol (France) 6 points
29. Esmee Vermeulen (Netherlands) 6 points
29. Danielle Huskisson (Great Britain) 6 points
29. Yukimi Moriyama (Japan) 6 points
29. Mackenzie Morgan Brazier (Australia) 6 points
29. Chloe Anne Gubecka (Australia) 6 points
29. Ellen Olssson (Sweden) 6 points
29. Betina Lorscheitter (Brazil) 6 points
29. Hou Yawen (China) 6 points
38. Alice Dearing (Great Britain) 5 points
39. Minami Niikura (Japan) 4 points
39. Yumi Kida (Japan) 4 points
39. Fang Qu (China) 4 points
39. Hannah Blackwood (New Zealand) 4 points
39. Andrea Terriault (Canada) 4 points
39. Heidi Ullrich (Canada) 4 points
39. Sandra Frimerman-Bergquist (USA) 4 points
39. Mia Desjarlais (Canada) 4 points
47. Chase Travis (USA) 3 points
48. Lara Grangeon (France) 2 points
48. Adeline Furst (France) 2 points
48. Lisa Lydie Madeleine Pou (France) 2 points
48. Kalliopi Araouzou (Greece) 2 points
48. Paula Ruiz (Spain) 2 points
48. Jeannette Spiwoks (Germany) 2 points
48. Souad Nefissa Cherouati (Algeria) 2 points
48. Eva Bonnet (Belgium) 2 points
48. Krystyna Panchishko (Ukraine) 2 points
48. Phoebe Louise Griffiths (Great Britain) 2 points
48. Ilona Michele Maille (France) 2 points
48. Claire Georgina Six (France) 2 points
48. Justyna Dorota Burska (Poland) 2 points
48. Lea Boy (Germany) 2 points
48. Caiping Yang (China) 2 points
48. Michelle Weber (South Africa) 2 points
48. Martina Grimaldi (Italy) 2 points
48. Maria da Valdes Alvarez (Peru) 2 points
48. Maryna Kyryk (Ukraine) 2 points
48. Xu Chu (China) 2 points
48. Melinda Novoszath (Hungary) 2 points
48. Alena Benesova (Czech Republic) 2 points
48. Onon Katalin Somenek (Hungary) 2 points
48. Nikolett Szilagyi (Hungary) 2 points
48. Eden Girloanta (Israel) 2 points
48. Adel Juhasz (Hungary) 2 points
48. Reka Rohacs (Hungary) 2 points
48. Luca Vas (Hungary) 2 points
48. Greta Szilvasi (Hungary) 2 points
48. Karolina Balaszikova (Slovakia) 2 points
48. Dana Akl (Egypt) 2 points
48. Dania Belisle (Canada) 2 points
48. Marie-Laurence Lortie (Canada) 2 points
48. Dong Fu Wei (China) 2 points
48. Mikayla Messer (Australia) 2 points
48. Sun Jia Ke (China) 2
48. Niu Xiao (China) 2
48. Yu Ruyi (China) 2
48. Chen Ci (China) 2
48. Jia Yi (China) 2
48. Jessica Lavin (Australia) 2 points
48. Katawan Teeka (Thailand) 2 points
48. WAI Ho Sheung Wai (Hong Kong) 2 points
48. Ka Ching Leung (Hong Kong) 2 points
48. Papuypha Leelahanon (Thailand) 2 points
48. Neeranuch Ponglangka (Thailand) 2 points
48. Warisara Khaengkun (Thailand) 2 points
48. Mahina Valdivia (Chile) 2 points
48. Stefannie Gillepsie (New Zealand) 2 points
48. Sabryna Lavoie (Canada) 2 points
Shan Lei (China) 0 points

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

An Audience & Swim With The King

Courtesy of The King’s Swimmers, Dublin, Ireland.

Kevin Murphy and Kathy Batts of The King’s Swimmers will hold a question-and-answer session that includes pizza and coffee on November 16th in Belfield, Dublin, Ireland and a follow-up Saturday swim on November 17th.

The event is hosted by the veterans of The King’s Swimmers and the East Coast of Ireland Open Water Swimming.

For more information, visit here or contact thekingsswimmers@gmail.com (@KingsSwimmers).

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming's Sole Survivor Returns

Courtesy of WOWSA, Savusavu, Fiji.

Shane Gould learned how to swim on the beaches of Fiji where her father was stationed in her youth.

By the age of 17, Gould made her mark as one of the greatest Olympic swimmers in history. Although she won 5 Olympic medals and held world records in the 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m, and 1500m freestyle and the 200 individual medley, she always strictly remained an amateur.

But the 61-year-old recently resurfaced to global fame and returned to where she learned how to swim when she won the most recent Australian edition of Survivor, the popular reality TV show. The Olympic champion unexpectedly outwitted and out-maneuvered all of her younger rivals and competitors.

The author of Tumble Turns won $500,000 as the winner of the Australian Survivor: Champions vs. Contenders, arguably the most unlikely winner in the Survivor franchise.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

International Winter Swimming Association World Records

Courtesy of International Winter Swimming Association.

25m Breaststroke World Records:
Alexandra Degtyareva (Belarus) on March 9th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 17.56
Tobias Wybierek (Germany) on March 9th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 14.53

25m Butterfly World Records:
Darya Borosh (Belarus) on November 3rd at the 2017 Jelgavas Roni Cup in Jelgava, Latvia 15.16
Yaroslav Pronin (Belarus) on November 3rd at the 2017 Jelgavas Roni Cup in Jelgava, Latvia 12.23

25m Freestyle World Records:
Yuliya Arlamenkova (Russia) on November 17th at the 2017 Russian Pacific Open Cup in Vladivostok, Russia 13.97

Aleksandr Morgunov (Russia) on November 17th at the 2017 Russian Pacific Open Cup in Vladivostok, Russia 11.16

50m Breaststroke World Records:
Aleksandra Bednarek (Poland) on March 10th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 37.89
Tobias Wybierek (Germany) on March 10th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 31.85

50m Freestyle World Records:
Alexandra Degtyareva (Belarus) on March 7th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 30.52
Aleksandr Morgunov (Russia) on November 17th at the 2017 Russian Pacific Open Cup in Vladivostok, Russia 24.75

100m Breaststroke World Records:
Ute Holt (Germany) on March 6th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 1.26.51
Sebastian Engel (Germany) on March 6th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 1.14.16

100m Freestyle World Records:
Margarita Karpacheva (Russia) on March 10th at the 2016 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tyumen, Russia 1.05.57
Yaroslav Pronin (Belarus) on March 6th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 54.38

200m Breaststroke World Records:
Aleksandra Bednarek (Poland) on March 7th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 3.00.53
Sebastian Engel (Germany) on March 7th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 2.48.21

200m Freestyle World Records:
Julia Wittig (Germany) on March 7th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 2.23.08
Yaroslav Pronin (Belarus) on November 17th at the 2017 Russian Pacific Open Cup in Vladivostok, Russia 2.02.59

450m Freestyle World Records:
Ines Hahn (Germany) on March 6th at the 2018 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tallinn, Estonia 5.40.57
Petar Stoychev (Bulgaria) on March 12th at the 2016 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tyumen, Russia 5.25.39

For more information about the International Winter Swimming Association, visit here.

Two-time world record holder Yaroslav Pronin is shown above with

Copyright © 2008-2018 by
World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program