DNOWS Header

Image Map

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Larissa Morato Does Travessia do Leme ao Pontal

Courtesy of Adherbal de Oliveira, Travessia do Leme ao Pontal, Brazil.

Larissa Lino Morato Campos from the city of Pará de Minas in the State of Minas Gerais became the youngest swimmer to complete the Travessia do Leme ao Pontal.

Larissa Morato registered her attempt in December 2017 and has been training ever since to complete the 36 km course along Rio de Janeiro.

Adherbal de Oliveira reported, "The weather conditions were very favorable with a sunny day forecast, sea currents to the east, weak winds, and a water temperature close to 24ºC.

Larissa entered the water with a wetsuit near 2 am on December 15th next to Pedra do Leme. From the beginning, printed a very strong rhythm of strokes and strides.

She easily adapted to the conditions of the sea even during the night.

After a little more than four hours, Larissa had overcome one of the most difficult stretches, the entrance of the beach of Barra da Tijuca with the Channel of Marapendi. It is here that the currents become stronger and the waves become obstacles. In the final stretch, she maintained an excellent average speed of more than 4 km per hour and 70 stroke per minute pace.

At each feeding stop, she showed great peace and joy and finished in 8 hours 41 minutes, setting a new female record with neoprene and becoming the youngest swimmer at 9 years 7 months to complete this challenge
."



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Cool Medal

Courtesy of Ned Denison, lac Léman, Switzerland.

One cool medal at the 480m race at the Coupe de Noël in Switzerland - with historical roots that date back to 1906.

The Coupe de Noël is a popular annual open water swimming competition created in 1934 when 9 swimmers competed in the 125 meter swim.

The event is the last remaining aquatic event in various French and European cities, inspired by the popular success of the Coupe de Noël in Paris, a race on December 25th across the Seine that was established in 1906 and stopped in 1940.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming In The Alps

Courtesy of WOWSA, Lake Wörthersee, Klagenfurt, Austria.

Wörthersee Swim Austria is a multi-race open water swimming competition in Lake Wörthersee, Austria. With 10 races held on September 7th - 8th 2019, it is called the biggest swimming adventure in the Alps.

Race distances include the following:

* 17 km from Velden to Klagenfurt
* 17 km 3-person relay from Velden to Klagenfurt, with exchanges at 7 km in Dellach and at 14 km in Krumpendorf
* 11 km Sport / Elite without wetsuits and without buoys in observance of FINA rules
* 9 km from Pörtschach to Klagenfurt
* 3 km from Krumpendorf to Klagenfurt
* 3 km 3-person relay from Krumpendorf to Klagenfurt with exchanges at 1 km in Kropfitsch Bad and 1 km at the Albatros rowing club
* 1500m Junior Open Water at Strandbad Klagenfurt
* 1000m Junior Open Water at Strandbad Klagenfurt
* 700m Junior Open Water at Strandbad Klagenfurt
* 500m Junior Open Water at Strandbad Klagenfurt



Klagenfurt is the capital city of the southern Austrian province of Carinthia on the eastern shore of Lake Wörthersee.

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Camilla Johansson-Sponseller Wins Double In Arctic Circle

Courtesy of WOWSA, Torne River, Finland-Sweden.

The 3 km Swim The Arctic Circle event is a cross-border midnight swim from Juoksenki, Finland to Juoksengi, Sweden in Torne River.

Held in July, the mass start of the 2000m race starts in Sweden on a beach north of the Arctic Circle and finishes south of the Arctic Circle as the swimmers cross the border of Finland en route. The start and finish at the Swedish shore.

Uniquely, the 3000m race starts at midnight in the Torne River as a night swim in the bright Nordic summer night. It starts on the Finish shore right after midnight Finnish time, crosses the Finnish-Swedish border and the Arctic Circle and the local time zone. Swimmers who swam the distance in less than 55 minutes reached the finish before the day the competition began.

Former Swedish Olympic backstroker (2000 Sydney Olympics) Camilla Johansson-Sponseller won both the 2 km and 3 km races while Adrian Bengtson finished second in the 2 km to Elias Kuusisto and won the 3 km race.

Women's 2000m Freestyle Top 25 Results:
1. Camilla Johansson-Sponseller, Sweden 24:54
2. Astrid Gustafsson, Sweden 25:12
3. Di Heelas, United Kingdom 27:40
4. Carina Helin, Sweden 27:56
5. Ingrid Lindelöw Berntsson, Sweden 28:14
6. Kristin Larsson, Sweden 28:26
7. Cerian Mellor, United Kingdom 28:28
8. Nerys Pearce, United Kingdom 28:35
9. Mervi Hillukkala, Finland 28:41
10. Tina Deeken, Germany 28:42
11. Josephine Hedblom, Sweden 29:38
12. Ellen Dyverfeldt, Sweden 29:55
13. Sofia Saukko, Finland 30:00
14. Daria Likhovich, Sweden 30:36
15. Deborah Banks, United Kingdom 30:49
16. Bianca Kempster, United Kingdom 31:20
17. Hayley Butlin, United Kingdom 31:32
18. Judith Bradford Knox, United Kingdom 31:35
19. Ann Chivers, United Kingdom 31:35
20. Anne Kenttä, Finland 31:50
21. Natalia Bakhtina, Russia 32:01
22. Zanna Clarke, United Kingdom 32:02
23. Beth Jackson, United Kingdom 32:06
24. Maja Sourdaine, Ireland 32:07
25. Amanda Nordmark, Sweden 32:14

Men's 2000m Freestyle Top 25 Results:
1. Elias Kuusisto, Finland 23:18
2. Adrian Bengtson, Sweden 23:29
3. Kieren Jon Lawrenson, Australia 23:57
4. Samuli Keisu, Finland 25:22
5. Daniel Hansson, Sweden 26:23
6. Steven Boyle, United Kingdom 26:31
7. Henrik Eyvind Bang Larsen, Sweden 27:23
8. Timo Siika-aho, Finland 29:22
9. Frank Hegger, Germany 30:09
10. Malcolm Burfitt, United Kingdom 30:10
11. Russell Wilfred, Finland 30:11
12. Vesa Keränen, Finland 30:20
13. Toby Cullen, United Kingdom 32:51
14. Fredric Hemphälä, Sweden 33:06
15. Jose Garcia-Rosell, Finland 33:08
16. Andrew Ainge, United Kingdom 33:19
17. Niall Tully, Ireland 33:29
18. Sven Rönbäck, Sweden 33:50
19. Aleksadr Garmatin, Russia 34:26
20. Olof Norberg, Sweden 34:48
21. Julian Ward, United Kingdom 34:48
22. Philip Warren, United Kingdom 35:46
23. Ville Tuominen, Finland 35:56
24. Neil Kolbert, United Kingdom 36:06
25. Mark Reed, United Kingdom 36:18

Women's 3000m Freestyle Top 25 Results:
1. Camilla Johansson-Sponseller, Sweden 31:59
2. Astrid Gustafsson, Sweden 32:05
3. Sanna Maasilta, Finland 33:09
4. Ingrid Lindelöw Berntsson, Sweden 34:38
5. Liudmila Popova, Russia 35:54
6. Nerys Pearce, United Kingdom 36:09
7. Di Heelas, United Kingdom 36:09
8. Cerian Mellor, United Kingdom 36:10
9. Mervi Hillukkala, Finland 36:14
10. Tina Deeken, Germany 36:33
11. Carina Helin, Sweden 36:38
12. Daria Likhovich, Russia 37:18
13. Zanna Clarke, United Kingdom 37:27
14. Nadezhda Kulikova, Russia 37:29
15. Rachael Hanrahan, United Kingdom 37:59
16. Louise Naylor, United Kingdom 38:26
17. Dawn Linford, United Kingdom 38:39
18. Eve Keskinen, Finland 38:48
19. Judith Bradford-Knox, United Kingdom 38:58
20. Samantha Chyriwsky, United Kingdom 39:30
21. Erinn Campbell, Australia 39:52
22. Beth Jackson, United Kingdom 40:01
23. Laura Hulse, United Kingdom 40:22
24. Natalia Bakhtina, Russia 40:26
25. Morven Bridges, United Kingdom 40:40

Men's 3000m Freestyle Top 25 Results:
1. Adrian Bengtson, Sweden 29:32
2. Kieren Jon Lawrenson, Australia 31:00
3. Samuli Keisu, Finland 32:01
4. Alan Coley-Smith, United Kingdom 33:21
5. Henrik Eyvind Bang Larsen, Sweden 34:39
6. Russell Wilfred, Finland 35:01
7. Martin Hunt, United Kingdom 37:01
8. Frank Hegger, Germany 37:56
9. Andrew Ternent, United Kingdom 38:01
10. Johnny Widén, Sweden 38:23
11. Malcolm Burfitt, United Kingdom 38:33
12. Kerry McFall, United Kingdom 38:38
13. Michael Davidson, United Kingdom 38:47
14. Neil Kolbert, United Kingdom 39:09
15. Dmitriy Loktev, Sweden 39:22
16. Marko Kahelin, Finland 40:35
17. Steven Gibson, United Kingdom 40:40
18. Fredric Hemphälä, Sweden 40:46
19. Aleksadr Garmatin, Sweden 41:08
20. Anton Shatrov, Sweden 41:11
21. Toby Cullen, United Kingdom 41:20
22. Andrew Ainge, United Kingdom 41:58
23. Gareth Davison, United Kingdom 42:24
24. Maciej Kadlubowski, Poland 42:54
25. Julian Ward, United Kingdom 43:14

For more information and to register for the July 13th 2019 event, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Mariia Yrjö‐Koskinen, Ice Swimming Hall Of Fame Honoree

Courtesy of Ned Denison, Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

International Winter Swimming Association president Mariia Yrjö‐Koskinen was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

It was a very well-deserved honor that the globe-trotting Finnish administrator and cold water swimming visionary was recognized as an Honor Swimmer by the organization founded by Ned Denison and Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

From her home in Riihimäki, Finland, Yrjö‐Koskinen is constantly on the go sanctioning and promoting the International Winter Swimming World Cup circuit from 2006 to the present.

She is always competing in her significant breaststroke, handing out awards to podium winners, and motivating newcomers during every significant winter swimming races and World Cup events.

The International Winter Swimming Association (IWSA) officially started in 2006 – but it emerged from historically traditional cold water activities. The tradition of sauna and dipping into a hole in the ice (ice hole swimming) is long established in Finland, the same thing that Yrjö‐Koskinen did during her childhood.

In 2002, she attended her first Finnish Winter Swimming Championships. Thoroughly intrigued by this growing organized competition, she later encouraged her local club to host the 2005 Finnish Winter Swimming Championships in order to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the City of Oulu. With her boundless energy, she arranged significant support from the City Council and launched a marketing campaign.

Her campaign attracted 1,200 winter swimmers including a team of 20 cold water swimmers from the South London Swimming Club that gave an international flavor to the event. This led her club to host the 2006 Winter Swimming World Championships where she marketed the event actively in Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Russia and the UK.

The 2006 event drew many swimmers - including fellow Ice Swimming Hall of Famer Lewis Pugh - and significant television, newspaper, magazine and social media attention. For the first time, freestyle races were included which helped increase the popularity of the discipline. Yrjö‐Koskinen then assembled an international board of directors and the International Winter Swimming Association was established in 2006.

This led to the South London Swimming Club hosting a 2006 event in London, the first UK Cold Water Championships. The Association then used this event as a springboard to promote the winter swimming niche globally as Yrjö‐Koskinen took the leadership mantle as its president.

Among her swimming accomplishments are as follows:

Contribution Summary:
 Yrjö‐Koskinen led the growth of the IWSA Winter Swimming World Championships from 680 swimmers in 2008 (London), 980 swimmers in 2010 (Lake Bled, Slovenia), 1,129 swimmers in 2012 (Jurmala, Latvia), 1,244 swimmers in 2014 (Rovaniemi, Finland), 1,275 swimmers in 2016 (Tyumen, Russia), and 1,366 swimmers and 800 at the gala dinner in 2018 (Tallinn, Estonia).
 Beginning in the 2015-2016 season, the IWSA organized an annual World Cup series. In the 2017-2018 season, the series attracted 1,456 swimmers (842 male and 614 female) representing 40 countries between the ages of 9 and 90.
 The IWSA has organized winter swimming events in the Springs Festival in Jinan, China for seven years with a future plan for an annual World Cup Competition. As part of this cooperation, Yrjö‐Koskinen was named as a Promotional Ambassador to Jinan Tourism 2017‐2019.
 Yrjö‐Koskinen traveled to 25 countries while representing the IWSA: Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Canada, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Norway, Poland, Russia, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, UK and USA.

Other Considerations
 Yrjö‐Koskinen competes in IWSA events with podium finishes.
 Yrjö‐Koskinen participated in the Bering Strait Relay, an Ice Swimming Hall of Fame event.
 Yrjö‐Koskinen started the first (summer) Finnish Open Water Swimming Championships in the City of Hämeenlinna in 2010 which continues annually.

Ned Denison explains, "The objective of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor leading ice and icy water swimmers and contributors to the sport. The Ice Swimming Hall of Fame serves as a historic record and provide heroes and role models for future generations.

In addition to Yrjö‐Koskinen, Honor Swimmer and Honor Administrator Ram Barkai, Honor Event Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA, Honor Swimmer Aleksander Brylin of Russia, Honor Swimmer Henri Kaarma of Estonia, Honor Swimmer Jaimie Monahan of the USA, Honor Swimmer Lewis Pugh of the UK, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored."


Her legacy is apparent, looking at the 2018-2019 season schedule:

* November 2nd 2018: 10th Jelgavas Roni Cup in Jelgava, Latvia, Stage 1 of the Winter Swimming World Cup
* November 15th 2018: 3rd Russian Pacific Winter Swimming Open Cup in Vladivostok, Russia
* December 20th 2018: Grand Prix Vladivostok 2018 in Vladivostok, Russia
* January 10th 2019: 5th China International Winter Swimming Festival on the Grand Canal in Taierzhuang, China
* January 12th 2019: 7th Winter Springs - Swimming (Daming Lake) International Invitational in Jinan, China
* January 16th 2019: 4th Minsk Open in Minsk, Belarus, Stage 2 of the Winter Swimming World Cup
* January 26th 2019: 8th UK Cold Water Swimming Championships in London, United Kingdom
* January 26th 2019: 15th Latvian Winter Swimming Championships in Liepaja, Latvia
* January 31st 2019: Winter Swimming World Cup in Lake Bled, Slovenia, Stage 3 of the Winter Swimming World Cup
* February 15th 2019: 8th Scandinavian Winter Swimming Championships in Skelleftea, Sweden, Stage 4 of the Winter Swimming World Cup
* February 24th 2019: 52nd Winter Swimming Across The Meuse River in Huy, Belgium
* March 1st 2019: 2nd St. Petersburg Big Neva Winter Swimming Cup in St. Petersburg, Russia
* March 27th 2019: 1st Open Winter Swimming Championships of Karelia in Petrozavodsk, Russia, Stage 5 of the Winter Swimming World Cup

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Lewis Pugh, Ice Swimming Hall Of Fame Honor Swimmer



Courtesy of Ned Denison, Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

Lewis Pugh was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

It was a very well-deserved honor that the globe-trotting British ocean advocate was recognized as an Honor Swimmer by the organization founded by Ned Denison and Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

From his home base in Cape Town, South Africa Pugh has long been a well-known, well-respected figure on the geopolitical scene with his myriad Speedo Diplomatic efforts. He is just as often giving passionate talks in Davos, Switzerland and London to power-brokers as he is shuttling between Moscow, London, Cape Town and Washington D.C., talking with heads of states (presidents, prime ministers and royalty) and presenting to leading politicians, business tycoons, NGO administrators, and cabinet-level government officials. His global travels of millions of air miles have taken him to innumerable hotels and discussions with influence-makers in the marine environmental space that literally affect every human on the planet.

Among his swimming accomplishments are as follows:

Ice Swimming Resume
 1 mile unprecedented swim in 2005 in Deception Island in the South Shetland Islands in 2°C water in 30 minutes 30 seconds
 1.2 km unprecedented swim in 2006 in Nigards Glacier Lake, Norway in 0°C water in 23 minutes 50 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2005 in Magdalenefjord, Spitsbergen, Norwegian Arctic at 79°N in 3°C water in 21 minutes 30 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2005 in Verlegenhuken, Spitsbergen, Norwegian Arctic at 80°N in 3°C water in 20 minutes 30 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2005 in Petermann Island on the Antarctic Peninsula in 0°C water for 18 minutes 0 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2007 at the North Pole at -1.7°C water for 18 minutes 50 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2010 in Lake Pumori on the Khumbu Glacier on Mount Everest at 5,200 meters altitude in 2°C water for 22 minutes 51 seconds where Pugh says, "The fresh water and altitude presents a very different challenge where you must swim slowly."
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2016 in Half Moon Island in the Bellingshausen Sea at the Antarctic Peninsula at 62°S in 0°C water in 17 minutes 18 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2017 at the edge of the Arctic Sea Ice at 80°22’N in the Norwegian Arctic in 0.5°C water for 21 minutes 29 seconds
 1 km unprecedented swim in 2017 Grytviken, South Georgia in the Southern Ocean in 2.7°C to 3.6°C wate for 19 minutes 1 second
 330 meter unprecedented swim in 2018 at the Bay of Whales in the Ross Ice Shelf at 78°33’S (no sea further south in the world) that Pugh considers to be his toughest swim ever
 1 km unprecedented swim in Antarctica in 1.7°C water and ‐11°C air, ‐37°C wind chill for 5 minutes due to leopards seals and killer whales in the area

Icy Swims
 5 km unprecedented swim in 2003 in North Cape, Norway in 8°C water in 1 hour 4 minutes
 1 km in 2016 around Cape Horn, Chile at 56°S in 7°C water in 18 minutes 22 seconds

Other Considerations
 Pugh has a decade long record of major, positive media attention as an ocean advocate, a well-established ambassador of Speedo Diplomacy
 International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame Class of 2013 Honor Swimmer
 Appointed as the United Nations Patron of the Oceans in 2013
 Negotiated the creation of the Ross Sea Marine Protected Area off Antarctica in 2013. It is the largest protected area in the world.

"All the swims were in the sea except in Nigards Glacier Lake and Lake Pumori on Mount Everest," explains Ned Denison. "Lewis’s swims followed English Channel rules for costume, boat contact, etc. and were part of major well-documented expeditions that were not under the rules of any organization or ratified. His accomplishments have never been disputed.

The objective of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor leading ice and icy water swimmers and contributors to the sport. The Ice Swimming Hall of Fame serves as a historic record and provide heroes and role models for future generations.

In addition to Pugh, Honor Swimmer and Honor Administrator Ram Barkai, Honor Event Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA, Honor Swimmer Aleksander Brylin of Russia, Honor Swimmer Henri Kaarma of Estonia, Honor Swimmer Jaimie Monahan of the USA, Honor Contributor - Administrator Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen of Finland, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored."


Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Jaimie Monahan, Ice Swimming Hall Of Fame Honoree

Courtesy of Ned Denison, Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

Jaimie Monahan was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

It was a very well-deserved honor that the globe-trotting American executive was recognized as an Honor Swimmer by the organization founded by Ned Denison and Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

Monahan has long been a well-known, well-like and well-respected iconic figure in the winter swimming and ice swimming community. Among her accomplishments are as follows:

Certified Ice Sevens
 First in history to achieve the Ice Sevens

Certified Ice Miles
 2 April 2016 in Reykjavík, Iceland in 3.7°C water in 35 minutes
 18 December 2016 in Tyumen, Russia in ‐0.03°C water in 30 minutes 20 seconds
 13 February 2017 in Aguelmame Sidi Ali Lake, Morocco in 4.90°C water in 32 minutes 18 seconds
 4 March 2017 in Mikkelvik Brygge, Norway in 2.37°C water in 32 minutes 9 seconds
 9 March 2017 in Boston, USA in 4.63°C water in 26 minutes 16 seconds
 15 May 2017 in Tasman Lake, New Zealand in 2.37°C water in 26 minutes 44 seconds
 2 July 2017 in Los Cauquenes Resort Beach, Argentina in 4.77°C water in 29 minutes 5 seconds
 6 March 2018 in Paradise Harbour, Antarctica in 0.57°C water in 30 minutes 49 seconds
 10 June 2018 in Ilulissat Harbour, Greenland in 2.43°C water in 29 minutes 40 seconds

Recorded Ice Kilometer Races
 2014 Tallinn Open Open Cup 1 km in Tallinn, Estonia: First Overall Female
 2015 1st Annual International Ice Swimming Association World Championships 1 km in Murmansk, Russia: First Place Women 35‐39
 2017 2nd Annual International Ice Swimming Association World Championships 1 km in Burghausen, Germany: Third Place Women 35‐39

International Winter Swimming Association Events
 1st Overall Winner of the International Winter Swimming Association World Cup 2016
 7‐time USA Winter Swimming Champion in various events between 2015 and 2018
 Approximate number of events 100 with approximately 98% podium finishes (age group) and many overall female podium finishes

First Ever Epic Swims
 First Ice Sevens in history
 First International Ice Swimming Association documented Female Ice Zero Mile
 First International Ice Swimming Association documented Ice Mile in Morocco
 Part of first documented Polar Ice Mile Expedition
 First documented Ice Mile in New Zealand (second in Oceania)
 First documented Ice Mile in Greenland
 First person to swim an International Ice Swimming Association-documented Ice Mile on all 7 continents (Ice Sevens)

Other Considerations
 Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame

Denison explains, "The objective of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor leading ice and icy water swimmers and contributors to the sport. The Ice Swimming Hall of Fame serves as a historic record and provide heroes and role models for future generations.

In addition to Monahan, Honor Swimmer and Honord Administrator Ram Barkai, Honor Event Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA, Honor Swimmer Aleksander Brylin of Russia, Honor Swimmer Henri Kaarma of Estonia, Honor Swimmer Lewis Pugh of Great Britain, Honor Contributor - Administrator Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen of Finland, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored."


Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Tim Johnson's History of Open-Water Marathon Swimming

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Dr. Tim Johnson, a captain and professional engineer, wrote a book entitled History of Open-Water Marathon Swimming that was based on his background in navigation for swimmers in the around Manhattan Island Marathon Swim and development of computer analysis for that swim course.

After a study of historical swims, the application for this knowledge around the world became apparent and he undertook a writing to communicate these findings for select swims. He described numerous swims and included them in what was to become a book about the history of swimming.

The book is over 500 pages with 700+ references and up to 500 different swims mentioned.

The history is complete through 2004, but due to the last decade's explosion of open swimming events created to accommodate the worldwide interest.

The book does not cover all swims, most professional swims, swims shorter than 10K (except in the historical period), nor does it list all the swims for the English Channel, except for one swim of historical note that puts Diana Nyad’s historic technical swim from Cuba into context.

Tidal principles and current flows discussed apply to all start times for swims in open water and to the extent that a swimmer can incorporated a favorable flow in their swim will result in a faster transit time.

The book is available on Amazon.com.

Dr. Johnson has also authored Finding A Job In Tough Times, Performance Sailing on a J29, Stud of the Hudson: A Swim in Twenty Stages, and Introductory Digital Logic Labs: A Graphical Approach to Logic Design.

Dr. Johnson explained the physics of open water swimming at the 2010 Global Open Water Swimming Conference in New York City:



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Big Swim Memory For Marathoners



Courtesy of Ned Denison, English Channel.

Marathon swimming gets a little bit easier each year: GPS navigation, better carbohydrate/electrolyte knowledge and products, more inexpensive airfares, better communications, more organizers and events globally, more coaching, ten of thousands who have already completed their swims, better body understanding, and the explosion of information at the swimmer’s fingertips via blogs, books, articles, email, Skype, etc.

The complaint now is that the most popular swims like the English Channel need to be booked 2+ years in advance. Even this, however makes it a little bit easier for the aspiring marathon swimmer. Denison explains, “I booked my first marathon, the English Channel, 8 months in advance. Yes, I had done the 6-hour qualification swim – but that swim in calm seas, near land didn’t prepared me for the real thing. I failed my first attempt - perhaps related to drinking just 1.1 liters in the 8 hours – and me and my crew not knowing it was going to be a problem - because I simply wasn’t ready in hundreds of ways.

I went back and completed it 60 days later[ it was easy to get the last slot of the year on September 11th, but I still didn’t know what I was doing
.”

Denison, who has completed nearly 50 marathon swims gets frequent calls nearly 15 years later from aspiring marathon swimmers, explains, “Some proudly announce that they booked a slot last night for next year and will open the English Channel season in early June on a spring tide. They are shocked, disappointed and angry when I start to ask a few questions ... perhaps a subtle way of explaining a few home truths.

* Do you realize the temperature difference between early June and late August?
* Will your hand-picked crew of 3 have the experience of guiding you thru 4 of 5 previous marathons and experience of the English Channel?
* Do you know how many grams of carbo powder you can take in 6 hours without feeling bloated and start throwing up?
* Do you know how many grams of carbo powder you need to in 6+ hours to feel well fuelled?
* Do you have previous experience of fighting through the physical issues of cramps, dead arm and joint pain?
* Have you fought back from throwing up to complete a marathon?
* Have you swum from warm sun into the possibly soul-destroying cold darkness knowing that you have at least 5 more hours to go?
* Will you have done enough training to be physically and mentally ready when you start?
* Do you realize that the swim is often described a 10% physical and 90% emotional/mental?

I believe that the one critical factor missing from many aspiring marathoners is 'big swim memory'.

This memory gets built up over several years. Ideally the swimmer progresses 5 km, 7 km, 10 km, 15 km, 20 km, 25 km and 30 km long before they start an English Channel swim. They learn about the training they need.

Some need paddles and fast interval training, but I gave up swim paddles over 10 years ago and left behind years of elbow, shoulder and neck pains.

The crew often plays a critical role in a swim. They are the ones who adjust feeds after the swimmer throws up and they are the ones stopping the swimmer when the stroke rate drops from 65 to 50: at first to advise and warn and then possibly later to save their life be early spotting of hypothermia.

Big swim memory is also a major advantage during the low points in a big swim. The swimmers remember a worst time before and how they emotionally fought out to a better place and completed the swim.

Enjoy the multi-year journey. Build up with different, more difficult marathons in cold, warm, fresh and saltwater. Bond with a crew who know and love you. Jointly plan the next and next adventures and if you do swim the English Channel realize that there is still a big world out there with hundreds of other marathons to keep you amused well into your 60s and beyond
."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Henri Kaarma, Ice Swimming Hall Of Fame Honor Swimmer





Courtesy of Ned Denison, Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

Henri Kaarma of Estonia was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

It was a very well-deserved honor that the mild-mannered, seriously-minded Estonian banker was recognized as an Honor Swimmer by the organization founded by Ned Denison and Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

Kaarma has been a well-known, well-respected and iconic figure in the winter swimming and ice swimming community for many years. Among Kaarma's accomplishments are as follows:

Certified Ice Miles:
 16 December 2012, Tournament of Russian Cities in Tyumen, Russia: 1650m in 25 minutes 25 seconds in 0.3°C water and ‐33°C air
 23 March 2013, 79th Northern Festival in Murmansk, Russia: 2150m in 35 minutes 26 seconds in 0.5°C water and ‐3°C air
 15 December 2013, Tournament of Russian Cities in Tyumen, Russia: 2400m in 41 minutes 57 seconds in 0°C water and ‐8°C air

Recorded Ice Kilometer Races
 10 January 2015, Ice Swimming German Open 2015 in Burghausen, Germany: 2nd in 14 minutes 31.51 seconds in 4.8°C water and 2°C air
 7 February 2015, Ireland Ice Swimming Championships in Camlough Lake: 1st in 13 minutes 53.57 seconds to set an overall world record in 3.1°C water and 6.2°C air
 20 March 2015, 1st Ice Swimming World Championships in Murmansk, Russia: 3rd in 14 minutes 17.01 seconds, 1st in age group in 0.1°C water and ‐6°C air
 26 February 2016, IISA 1K Ice Swimming Estonian Championships in Tallinn, Estonia: 1st age group in 14 minutes 36.50 seconds in 0°C water and 2°C air
 6 January 2017, 2nd Ice Swimming World Championships in Burghausen, Germany: 3rd in age group in 14 minutes 2.26 seconds in 3°C water and ‐11°C air

International Winter Swimming Association Events
 8 IWSA world championship titles: 2010 4x25 breaststroke and 4x25 freestyle; 2012 450m freestyle; 2014 450m freestyle and 4x25 freestyle; 2016 4x25 freestyle; 2018 450m freestyle and 200m freestyle
 Overall 27 medals from International Winter Swimming Association World Championships

First Ever Epic Swims
 Participant in the 2013 International Bering Strait relay crossing

Other Special Swims or Conditions
 8 January 2011, Pirita Open 2011 in Tallinn, Estonia: 1000m in 14 minutes 58 seconds in 0.4°C water and ‐1°C air to complete the first 1K swim in Estonia with one digital thermometer
 16 November 2013, Anne Ahven 2013 in Tartu, Estonia: 3240m in 59 minutes in 4.9°C water and 8°C air to complete the first 2‐mile swim below 5°C water, one digital thermometer
 22 February 2014, Pirita Open 2014 in Tallinn, Estonia: 1650m in 24 minutes in 0,1°C water and 4°C air, mile below 5°C with 3 digital thermometers
 28 February 2015, Pirita Open 2015 in Tallinn, Estonia: 1750m in 27 minutes 25 seconds in 2°C water and 2°C air, mile below 5°C with 3 digital thermometers

Other Considerations
 Initiator of winter swimming as a competitive sport in Estonia
 Founder of the annual Winter Swimming Festival Pirita Open
 Ice swimming evangelist

Denison explains, "The objective of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor leading ice and icy water swimmers and contributors to the sport. The Ice Swimming Hall of Fame serves as a historic record and provide heroes and role models for future generations.

In addition to Kaarma, Honor Swimmer and Honord Administrator Ram Barkai, Honor Event Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA, Honor Swimmer Aleksander Brylin of Russia, Honor Swimmer Jaimie Monahan of the USA, Honor Swimmer Lewis Pugh of Great Britain, Honor Contributor - Administrator Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen of Finland, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored."


Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, December 14, 2018

Welcome, Welcome, Welcome To Russia

Courtesy of International Swimming Hall of Fame, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

International Swimming Hall of Fame curator Bruce Wigo called Lynne Cox's 1987 Bering Strait crossing between between the Diomede Islands on either side of the Soviet Union and American border, "This might be one of the most significant swims in the history of the world."

Wigo explained Cox's journey on a recent Travel Channel show called Mysteries at the Museum. The episode was filmed at the International Swimming Hall of Fame and demonstrates how close the Soviet Union and the USA are to each other.

Now We Are Talking Big

Courtesy of Surfline, Mavericks, California.

Whether it is freedivers going deep below the ocean's surface, ice swimmers plunging into below freezing water temperatures, marathon swimmers swimming for days, or surfers gliding down mountainous waves, the ocean offers all kinds of extreme conditions in which athletes can push themselves.

The Mavericks Challenge, a Big Wave World Tour event in Mavericks in northern California, is one such event. The Big Wave Tour commissioner Mike Parsons, in consultation with other World Surfing League experts, has announced its revised schedule due to extremely large ocean swells that are estimated to come in between 40 to 60 feet tall with a few occasional 65+ feet waves.

Surfer’s representative Jamie Mitchell explained the expected conditions, “The conditions and the lump from the night before is gonna make it tough — the ocean is not going to be sustainable for 60- to 70-foot surf. If it was coming in with groomed conditions, then for sure we’d want to do it.

It’s not the size it’s the conditions, which is same thing that happened at Jaws, when we had to call that off. Ultimately, we wanna see a contest that’s run with lots of waves being ridden. So surfers win, it’s not a survival deal
.”

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming Canada Honors Stephanie Horner

Courtesy of Kevin Light.

Three-time Canadian Olympian Stephanie Horner of Beaconsfield, Quebec has proved herself in the pool and she is gradually proving herself in the open water.

Horner finished 8th in the 10 km race at the 2018 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships in Chiba, Japan to earn Swimming Canada’s Female Open Water Swimmer of the Year. “I’m pleased and honoured to receive this award. It’s always motivating to be recognized for your hard work.”

Horner finished as the top female Canadian at the 2018 UANA Open Water Swimming Championships in the Cayman Islands which qualified her for Japan.

Her season was another stepping stone along her journey to a possible fourth Olympic Games in 2020. “Having raced in Japan this summer at the Pan Pacific Games was a great sneak peek to Tokyo 2020.”

Horner has spent the past couple years training with Martin Gingras at the Pointe-Claire Swim Club who was awarded Coach of the Year - Female Open Water Swimmer for his work with Horner. After the 2018 season, Horner decided to move back to Victoria, where she trained a few years ago, to train with High Performance Centre coach Ryan Mallette.

Horner qualified for her first international open water event at the 2015 World University Games after competing in two Olympic Games in the pool. At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Horner competed in her first Olympic open water event where she finished 23rd. In 2019, she is focused on making the 2019 FINA World Championship team. “Every race leading up to trials is an opportunity to improve and to gain experience. I look forward to more international racing and to keep challenging myself against the best in the world.”

The 2019 season will be an important one for open water swimmers - 10 men and 10 women will have the opportunity to earn a coveted spot in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim final at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics by finishing in the Top 10 at the 2019 FINA World Championships in Gwangju, Korea in July.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming Canada Honors Eric Hedlin



Courtesy of FINA.

Eric Hedlin and Stephanie Horner were honored as Swimming Canada’s Male and Female Open Water Swimmers of the Year based on their performances at the 2018 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships in Chiba, Japan.

Hedlin won a silver medal in the 10 km race in Chiba, Japan. Hedlin previously won a silver medal in the 5 km race at the 2013 FINA World Championships in Barcelona [see FINA video above], but it has taken time to return to the podium in another international competition. “Coming out of the 2017 season, where I had a disappointing placement in the 5 km at Worlds and wasn't able to race at the World University Games due to high water temperatures, I knew I could do better and wanted the 2018 season to reflect my feelings.”

Hedlin started his 2018 open water season at the FINA/HOSA Marathon Swim World Series in Doha, Qatar finishing 60th overall. “I had an eye opening experience at a race in Doha. It was one of the largest packs I had raced against, and although I did not place highly, I learned that I needed to work on my in-pack swimming and took this into consideration in future races.”

Hedlin's swimming went on an upswing from Qatar. He won a silver medal in the 5 km at the USA Swimming Open Water National Championships. He then went on to win a gold medal at the 2018 UANA Open Water Swimming Championships in the Cayman Islands. Hedlin finished the season with his best 10 km performance in Japan. “I felt confident going into the race and I executed my race plan just how I had intended. It was an amazing way to end the season.”

Born in Calgary, and raised in San Diego, California, Hedlin returned to Canada after high school to further his swimming career in Victoria. Hedlin now trains with coach Ron Jacks, who was named Coach of the Year – Male Open Water Swimmer.

The 2019 season will be an important one for open water swimmers - 10 men and 10 women will have the opportunity to earn a coveted spot in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim final at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics by finishing in the Top 10 at the 2019 FINA World Championships in Gwangju, Korea in July.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Celebrating Australian Channel Swimmers

Courtesy of Michael Teys, Sydney, Australia.

The inaugural Australian Channel Swimmer's Dinner was held on November 17th at the MUA/ITF Conference Center in Sydney. Michael Teys hosted the event. "We celebrated Australian long distance swimmers and their crew. We recognized this year's Oceans Seven swimmer and Triple Crown of Open Water Swimmers while paying tribute to the first English Channel swimmers."

Among the honorees, the swims of Susie Maroney (English Channel crossings achieved on July 31st 1990 in 8 hours 29 minutes at the age of 15, and a two-way crossing in 17 hours 14 minutes - 8 hours 19 minutes one way and 8 hours 55 minutes the other way - at the age of 16 on July 22nd 1991), Cyril Baldock (English Channel crossings achieved in 1993, a four-way relay in 43 hours 7 minutes, on August 18th 1985 in 10 hours 44 minutes, and on August 20th 2014 in 12 hours 45 minutes at the age of 70 years 9 months), and Shelley Taylor-Smith (English Channel crossing achieved on August 27th 1990 in 9 hours 27 minutes) were recognized.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Aleksander Brylin, Ice Swimming Hall Of Fame Honor Swimmer





Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Aleksander Brylin of Russia was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

It was no surprise that Brylin was recognized as an Honor Swimmer by the organization founded by Ned Denison and Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

Brylin has been a well-known, well-respected and personable figure in the ice swimming community for some time. Among Brylin's accomplishments are as follows:

Certified Ice Miles:
 16 December 2012 Tournament of Russian Cities in Tyumen, Russia: 2200m in 1 hour 5 seconds in 0.3°C water and -33°C air temperatures
 12 June 2017 in Lake Baikal, Russia: 1650m in 36 minutes 58 seconds in 4.7°C

Recorded Ice Kilometer Races:
 20 March 2105 IISA 1st World Championships in Murmansk, Russia: 20 minutes 14 seconds (breaststroke) in 0.08°C water
 10 April 2106 World Championships in Krasnoyarsk, Russia: 21 minutes 50 seconds in 0.0°C water [Ice Zero breaststroke]
 08 June 2017 in Lake Baikal, Russia: 21 minutes 51 seconds in 4.6°C water
 25 February 2018 IISA Great British Championships in Hatfield, England: 20 minutes 50 seconds in 3.6°C water

Pioneering Epic Swims:
 5.6 km Diomede Islands Swim on 1 August 2014 from Little Diomede Island, USA to Big Diomede Island (Ratmanova Island), Russia breaststroke in 2 hours 7 minutes in 4°C - 6°C water [ae charity swim with MadSwimmer to support children in need in South Africa and Russia]
 Organized and participated in the 2013 Bering Strait crossing
 20 km down the fast‐flowing River Yenisei in Krasnoyarsk, Russia in 2006 in 1 hour 52 minutes in 8°C water
 Organizer and participant of a 65 km relay across Lake Baikal from Olkhon to Gremyachinsk in 2007 in 10°C water and 2.9°C air

Denison explains, "The objective of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor leading ice and icy water swimmers and contributors to the sport. The Ice Swimming Hall of Fame serves as a historic record and provide heroes and role models for future generations.

In addition to Brylin, Honor Swimmer and Honord Administrator Ram Barkai, Honor Event Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA, Honor Swimmer Henri Kaarma of Estonia, Honor Swimmer Jaimie Monahan of the USA, Honor Swimmer Lewis Pugh of Great Britain, Honor Contributor - Administrator Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen of Finland, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored."


Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Bering Strait Relay, Ice Swimming Hall Of Fame Honor Event







Courtesy of Ariel Calderon, Bering Strait, Russia to Alaska.

"It was the most inherently dangerous relay in history in my opinion," commented Steven Muñatones. "The logistical and operational requirements of this 6-day relay swim across the Bering Strait from Cape Dezhnev in Chukotka, Russia, to Cape Prince of Wales in Alaska, USA (passing both Big Diomede and Little Diomede Islands) was an unprecedented undertaking that required the sustained, focused support of 121 individuals who were experienced in managing or swimming cold, turbulent seas.

It is almost unfathomable to think of a more challenging and risky swimming achievement with so many swimmers in the water over nearly a week
."

The Bering Strait separates Russia and Alaska slightly south of the Arctic Circle at about 65° 40' N latitude and is within a closed Russian military zone.

The 2013 Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

Conducted in water temperatures between 4°C and 6°C, it took years to obtain all the requisite government permissions, to agree upon all the safety protocols, secure the mother ship, hospital ship and ribs, and recruit an experienced group of hardened swimmers.

Ned Denison explains, "The event was very significant on many fronts: It was a very high‐profile event with massive media, social media, film and swimming community attention. It highlighted the danger and provided an excellent example of the investment in safety (55 staff members on the water) required in the sport.

The relay was selected as the 2013 World Open Water Swimming Performance of the Year and was one of the key unifying events in the global development of ice. 44 swimmers from 15 regions of the Russian Federation in addition to 22 other swimmers from 15 countries including South Africa, Australia, Italy, Chile, Argentina, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Poland, Czech Republic, Latvia, Ukraine, China, the UK and the USA have been and continue to be leaders of ice swimming community across the rest of the world
."

It is a well-deserved recognition that Bering Strait Relay was recognized as an Honor Event by the new organization founded by Denison and Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

In addition to the Relay, Honor Swimmer and Honor Contributor Ram Barkai of South Africa, Honor Swimmer Aleksander Brylin of Russia, Honor Swimmer Henri Kaarma of Estonia, Honor Swimmer Jaimie Monahan of the USA, Honor Swimmer Lewis Pugh of Great Britain, Honor Contributor - Administrator Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen of Finland, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored.

The international relay started at 4:24 pm on August 5th and finished at 4:52 pm on August 11th 2013 with the following members taking part:

Swimmers:
1. Vladimir Chegorin, Russia
2. Maria Chizhova, Novosibirsk, Russia
3. Elena Guseva, Russia
4. Ram Barkai, Cape Town, South Africa
5. Jack Bright, UK
6. Oksana Veklich, Blagoveshchensk, Russia
7. Aleksandr Jakovlevs, Jelgava, Latvia (Starter, Swimmer, Navigator)
8. Matías Ola, Buenos Aires /Tucuman Argentina
9. Henri Kaarma, Tallinn, Estonia
10. Toomas Haggi, Tallinn, Estonia
11. Nuala Moore, Ireland
12. Anne Marie Ward, Donegal, Ireland
13. Toks Viviers, Cape Town, South Africa
14. Melissa O’Reilly (‘Mo’), Lambertville, New Jersey, USA
15. Ryan Stramrood, Cape Town, South Africa
16. Cristian Vergara, Santiago, Chile
17. Craig Lenning, Colorado, USA
18. Rafał Ziobro, Krakow, Poland
19. Andrew Chin, Cape Town, South Africa
20. Jackie Cobell, Tunbridge Wells, UK
21. James Pittar, Australia
22. Paolo Chiarino, Italy
23. Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen, Finland
24. Ivan Papulshenko, Ukraine
25. Zdenek Tlamicha, Czech Republic
26. Zhou Hanming, China
27. Oleg Adamov, Russia
28. Andrei Agarkov, Russia
29. Alekseev Semen, Russia
30. Tatiana Alexandrova, Russia
31. Roman Belan, Russia (Swimmer and Starter)
32. Elena Semenova, Russia
33. Alexander Brylin, Russia
34. Afanasii Diackovskii, Russia
35. Vladimir Nefatov, Russia (Swimmer and Chief Starter)
36. Evgenii Dokuchaev, Russia
37. Oleg Docuckaev, Russia (Swimmer and Chief Organiser)
38. Roman Efimov, Russia
39. Dmitrii Filitovich, Russia
40. Olga Filitovich, Russia (Swimmer and Starter/helper)
41. Victor Godlevskiy, Russia (Swimmer and Starter/helper)
42. Olga Golubeva, Russia
43. Alexei Golubkin, Russia
44. Alexander Golubkin, Russia (youngest swimmer at 13 years old)
45. Alexsandr Iurkov, Russia (Starter, Swimmer, Navigator)
46. Oleg Ivanov, Russia
47. Pavel Kabakov, Russia (Swimmer, starter, navigator)
48. Eduard Khodakovskiy, Russia
49. Aleksandr Komarov, Russia
50. Aleksandr Kuliapin, Russia
51. Andrey Kuzmin, Russia
52. Irina Lamkina, Russia
53. Vladimir Litvinov, Russia
54. Andrey Mikhalev, Russia
55. Victor Moskvin, Russia
56. Nikolay Petshak, Russia
57. Sergey Popov, Russia
58. Vladimir Poshivailov, Russia
59. Grigorii Prokopchuk, Russia
60. Dmitrii Zalka, Russia
61. Natalia Seraya, Russia
62. Viacheslav Shaposhnikov, Russia
63. Olga Sokolova, Russia
64. Andrei Sychev, Russia
65. Alexei Tabakov, Russia
66. Nataliia Usachaeva, Russia

Support Crew:
67. Nikolay Khitrik, Russia (Organizer)
68. Lurii Melnikov, Russia (Organizer)
69. Sergei Chernukhin, Russia (Organiser)
70. Irina Makarova, Russia (Interpreter, Starter, helper)
71. Alexey Svistunov, Russia (President of Russian Book of Records)
72. Rafael Valdes Mendosa, Russian (Interpreter, Starter)
73. Evgeny Novazheev, Russia (kite surfer)
74. Denis Berezhnoy, Russia (kite surfer)
75. Sergey Semenov, Russia (kite surfer)
76. Mariia Netrebenko, Russia (mass media representative)
77. Viktor Muzhetckii, Russia (cameraman)
78. Vladislav Bochkovskii, Russia (mass media representative)
79. Vladislav Bykov, Russia (cameraman)
80. Dmitrii Timofeev, Russia (research team)
81. Victoria Brylin, Russia (recovery team)
82. Nataliya Fatyanova, Russia (Head of medical group)
83. Irina Zhidkova, Russia (doctor)
84. Aleksandr Gremitskikh, Russia (Chief Judge)
85. Krutikov Konstantin, Russia (mass media representative)
86. Gavriil Ugarov, Russia (research crew)
87. Denis Kabakov, Russia (support crew)
88. Kiriil Zaika, Russia (support crew)
89. Natalia Yael Szydlowski, Argentina (nutritionist)
90. Paolo Adolfo Testa, Argentina (coach)
91. Carlos Eduardo Reges, Argentina (doctor)
92. Anibal Ariel Calderon, Argentina (cameraman)
93. Guillermo Gallishaw, Argentina (cameraman)
94. Alasdair Ross McCulloch, South Africa (cameraman)

Irtysh Hospital Ship Support Crew:
95. Yason Demeev, Russia (Chief of Hospital)
96. Oleg Revutskiy, Russia (surgeon)
97. Vyacheslav Grigoryev, Russia (traumatologist)
98. Valeriy Koshkin, Russia (dermatologist)
99. Svetlana Gulenkova, Russia (stomatologist)
100. Inna Lesnova, Russia (therapeutist)
101. Vladimir Savinskiy, Russia (doctor of functional diagnostics)
102. Sergey Demyanenko, Russia (Doctor of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics)
103. Sergey Milovanov, Russia (anesthesiologist)
104. Denis Yakushin, Russia (anesthesiologist)
105. Georgiy Feodoridi, Russia (neurosurgeon)
106. Igor Rogushin, Russia (opthamologist)
107. Yuriy Obraztsov, Russia (infectionist)
108. Oleg Fartushin, Russia (radiologist)
109. Elena Ionova, Russia (pharmacist)
110. Larisa Popova, Russia (nurse)
111. Svetlana Demenok, Russia (nurse)
112. Galina Domnina, Russia (nurse)
113. Tatyana Bolshakova, Russia (nurse)
114. Svetlana Panidova, Russia (nurse)
115. Maya Surgayeva, Russia (nurse)
116. Ludmila Denisova, Russia (nurse)
117. Valentina Shilova, Russia (nurse)
118. Elena Repula, Russia (nurse)
119. Elena Kukurba, Russia (nurse)
120. Elena Sadovaya, Russia
121. Tatyana Nikolaeva, Russia

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Ranomi Roars, Wins World Championships

Courtesy of FINA, Hangzhou, China.

Dutch freestyler Ranomi Kromowidjojo is back on top. After winning three Olympic gold medals in the sprint events at the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games, she finished out of podium positions in her individual and relay events at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

But she is returned to form by winning the 100m freestyle title at the FINA World Short Course Championships in Hangzhou, China.

Earlier this year, she visited San Francisco and competed in the RCP Tiburon Mile. While the one nautical mile race from Angel Island is a little bit outside her preferred distance, it was clear in San Francisco that her competitive fire is stoked with the 2020 Tokyo Olympics less than 2 years away.

The underwater cameras in the pool during the 100m freestyle final show Kromowidjojo's technically beautiful arm stroke, underwater streamlining, and her body and head position very well.

Footnote: On December 15th, Kromowidjojo set the 50m butterfly Championship Meet record on the fourth night of the 2018 FINA Short Course World Swimming Championships with a time of 24.47.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Trans Tahoe Relay From Above

Lake Tahoe 2017 from Colin Babcock.

Colin Babcock is an American cinematographer and open water swimmer from California who served as captain of the Real Housewives of The Olympic Club that placed 3rd in the Trans Tahoe Relay in July 2018. His aerial views of the 2017 Trans Tahoe Relay are captured above.

Copyright © by Colin Babcock

Ram Barkai, Ice Swimming Honor Swimmer & Contributor

Courtesy of Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

South African Ram Barkai was one of the inaugural honorees of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame.

It is no surprise that Barkai was recognized as an Honor Swimmer and Honor Contributor - Administrator by the new organization founded by several luminaries in the ice swimming community, led by Ned Denison and including Paolo Chiarino, Elaine Howley, Pádraig Mallon, Leszek Naziemiec, Kieron Palframan, Shelley Taylor-Smith, and Jonty Warneken.

Barkai and a hardened group of fellow South Africans, formalized the sport and established the International Ice Swimming Association in 2009 for those adventurers who wanted to compete and challenge themselves in bodies of water without a wetsuit in water 5°C (41°F) or less.

He first started to promote the Ice Mile and then expanded to the Ice Kilometer, Ice Sevens and the World Ice Swimming Championships.

Denison explains, "The objective of the Ice Swimming Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor leading ice and icy water swimmers and contributors to the sport. The Ice Swimming Hall of Fame serves as a historic record and provide heroes and role models for future generations.

In addition to Barkai, Honor Event Bering Strait Relay from Russia to USA, Honor Swimmer Aleksander Brylin of Russia, Honor Swimmer Henri Kaarma of Estonia, Honor Swimmer Jaimie Monahan of the USA, Honor Swimmer Lewis Pugh of Great Britain, Honor Contributor - Administrator Mariia Yrjö-Koskinen of Finland, and Honor Contributor - Media Steven Muñatones of the USA were also honored."


Barkai's dual honor was due to his extensive and comprehensive activities and achievements in the sport:

As an Honor Contributor ‐ Administrator:
 Barkai founded the International Ice Swimming Association (IISA) in July 2009 with members in 63 countries, Ice Mile and Ice Kilometers swimmers from 32 countries, organizers of rules, publicity, board, world championships, etc.
 As Chairperson, Barkai recruited and managed an international board of ice swimmers and organizers and put in place strong country organisations in the USA, UK, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, etc. The website is professional, and swimmers are proud to have their results listed.
 The Ice Mile brand is the strongest brand in the sport where swimmers proudly wear their red jackets.
 IISA has continued to improve the safety standards in the sport.
 Barkai was the organizer and race director for the IISA South Africa Championships in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2018 and the IISA South Africa Ice Swimming Championships in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018, responsible for organizing and recruiting swimmers for these events.
 Approximately 15 to 20 swimmers were involved, helping to propel South Africa to third place on the global chart for Ice Milers at a site in Lesotho, the landlocked tribal kingdom in the mountains that provide the only possible sub-5°C waters in South Africa.
 Barkai is responsible for the following notable events:
- in 2010, the world‐first Ice Mile event with Ice mile swimmers in 5°C water featured on SuperSport South Africa
- in 2011, 20 short‐distance swimmers, 13 Ice Mile swimmers in 5°C water featured on SuperSport South Africa
- in 2012, 15 short distance swimmers, 10 Ice Mile swimmers in 1.7°C water featured on SuperSport South Africa
- in 2014, organized an Antarctica trip with 6 South African swimmers in -1°C water with distances varied from 1 km to 1 mile and featured in many media outlets
- in 2015, the first Ice Kilometer swimming event with 20 swimmers
- in 2016, the South Africa Ice Swimming Championships, an Ice Kilometer race at 3000m altitude with 14 swimmers in 4°C water featured on CNN
- in 2018, the South Africa Ice Swimming Championships, an Ice Kilometer race at 3000m altitude with 15 swimmers in 3°C water featured on SuperSport South Africa
 Barkai serves as the leading ambassador/evangelist for the sport and has travelled internationally more than 20 times spreading the word about the sport (and always getting in a swim) in WOWSA conferences in Los Angeles, New York and Scotland, the Chill Swim in the UK, the IWSA World Championships in Finland and Estonia, and IISA events in Ireland, UK, China, Russia, Germany, Ireland, Scotland, Poland, Czech Republic, Austria, Lesotho, and France.
 IISA marketing professionalism has helped inspire extensive and positive coverage of the sport on the Discovery Channel – Ice Swimming, History Channel – Ice Swimming, CNN Big Story, BBC, NBC, Al Jazeera, Malaysia FM, Hong Kong TV, Xtreme Magazine, etc.

As an Honor Swimmer:
 In addition to founding and running the IISA, Barkai has also been a prolific participant and pioneer of the sport, helping set the pace for ice swimmers around the world.
 His certified Ice Miles include:
1. 31 January 2009: Lake Zurich, Switzerland, 4.0°C water, 1.43 miles, 43:00
2. 17 July 2010: Fraserburg, South Africa, 4.5°C water, 1.00 mile, 33:00
3. 23 July 2011: Fraserburg, South Africa, 5.0°C water, 1.00 mile, 28:59
4. 4 January 2012: Loch Fiskaley, Scotland, 2.0°C water, 1.00 mile, 28:03
5. 15 July 2012L Fraserburg, South Africa, 1.70°C water, 1.00 mile, 31:33
6. 31 January 2013: Lake Holborough, Kent, UK, 3.5°C water, 1.00 mile, 31:14
7. 23 March 2013: Murmansk, Russia, 0.0°C water, 1.00 mile, 32:43
8. 31 December 2014: Vltava River, Branik, Prague, 4.6°C water, 1.03 mile, 30:00
9. 31 December 2015: Aukreyri, Iceland, 4.63°C water, 1.00 mile, 32:18
10. 12 June 2017: Lake Baikal, Russia, 4.7°C water, 1.00 mile, 31:45
11. 22 June 2017, Svalbard, Arctic Sea, 4.61°C water, 1.03 mile, 28:16
 His recorded Ice Kilometer Races include podium finishes:
1. 11 January 2015: 1st Aqua Sphere Ice Swimming German Open, Lake Woehrsee, Burghausen, Germany, 4.8°C water, 17:20
2. 20 March 2015: IISA 1st World Championship, Lake Semenovskoye, Murmansk, Russia, 0.08°C water, 16:39
3. 19 December 2015: River Labe CZ Ice Swim 2015, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic, 4.7°C water, 17:59
4. 10 January 2016, 2nd Aqua Sphere Ice Swimming German Open, Lake Woehrsee, Burghausen, Germany, 3.9°C water, 17:28
5. 23 January 2016, Polish Championships – Ice Swimming IISA 1 km, Katowice, Poland, 2.0°C water, 16:55
6. 30 January 2016: International Ice Swimming Association Ireland 1K National Championships, Wild Water Armagh, Ireland, 4.5°C water, 16:53
7. 7 August 2016, IISA South African 2016 Championships, Afriski Resort, Lesotho, South Africa, 4.5°C water, 25:48
8. 6 January 2017, 3rd Aqua Sphere Ice Swimming German Open, Lake Woehrsee, Burghausen, Germany, 3.4°C water, 16:58.85
9. 11 February 2017, Ice Cup and Great British Ice Swimming, The Cruin, Loch Lomond, Scotland, 4.2°C water, 22:08
10. 8 June 2017, Russia 2017 Baikal Mile, Lake Baikal, Russian Federation, 4.6°C water, 18:58.43
11. 7 January 2018, Ice swimming German Open, Vietsbronn, Germany, 3.8°C water, 17:36.30
12. 25 February 2018, IISA Great Britain Championships, Hatfield Outdoor Activity Centre, UK, 3.6°C water, 16:13.44
 Certified Ice Sevens with four swims completed and three to go
 Unprecedented Epic Swims include:
- Antarctica 2008 1K in 0°C water – current Guinness World Record for southernmost Ice Swim
- Third person to swim in Antarctica after Lynne Cox and Lewis Pugh
- Second person to swim 2.3 km in 2009 Lake Zurich at 4°C water
- Participant in the Bering Strait Relay
 Other Special Swims and Conditions
- Tyumen 1K at 0°C water with ‐33°C air temperature
- Swam in Magellan Strait, Beagle Channel and around Cape Horn within 10 days

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program