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Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Celebration Of Open Water Swimming In Kendal



Courtesy of Colin Hill Swims, Kendal, United Kingdom.

Kendal Mountain Festival is an Adventure Film Festival in Kendal, UK that celebrates adventure outdoor activities including outdoor swimming.

Colin Hill hosted the Outdoor Swimming Session where Katie Maggs, Dan Duxbury, Calum Maclean and Colleen Blair spoke about their achievements and the sport.

For more information, visit www.mountainfest.co.uk.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Colin Hill Shows Highlights From Doha - Women's 10 km





Courtesy of Colin Hill, Doha Bay, Qatar.

Disappointed in 2008, 2012 and 2016, Ana Marcela Cunha got off to an excellent start in the build-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics with a victory on the opening stop on the 2019 FINA Marathon Swim Series.

With her victory, the Brazilian dynamo is most definitely one of the odds-on favorites for winning the 2019 FINA World Championships in South Korea this summer and qualifying for the 10 km swim at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Cunha beat an emerging Kareena Lee of Australia by 0.40 seconds, 2016 silver medalist Rachele Bruni of Italy by 1.50 seconds, and 2012 silver medalist Haley Anderson by 3.90 seconds in Qatar.

The race in Doha Bay may be a preview of the Olympic final in Tokyo next year.

With a completely flat, very warm-water conditions expected in Tokyo, the race will be close - with 2016 Olympic champion Sharon van Rouwendaal and France's Aurélie Muller also expected to be racing in the lead pack.

10 km Results:
1 Ana Marcela Cunha, Brazil 2:03:51.50
2 Kareena Lee, Australia 2:03:52.00
3 Rachele Bruni, Italy 2:03:53.00
4 Haley Anderson, USA 2:03:55.40
5 Leonie Beck, Germany 2:03:55.80
6 Giulia Gabbrielleschi, Italy 2:03:58.20
7 Yawen Hou, China 2:03:59.00
8 Arianna Bridi, Italy 2:04:00.20
9 Hannah Moore, USA 2:04:00.30
10 Ashley Twichell, USA 2:04:01.60
11 Chloe Gubecka, Australia 2:04:03.50
12 Sharon van Rouwendaal, Netherlands 2:04:05.20
13 Finnia Wunram, Germany 2:04:05.50
14 Erica Sullivan, USA 2:04:09.30
15 Reka Rohacs, Hungary 2:04:12.30
16 Katy Campbell, USA 2:04:12.60
17 Mackenzie Brazier, Australia 2:04:13.20
18 Xin Xin, China 2:04:16.80
19 Paula Ruiz, Spain 2:04:18.40
20 Lea Boy, Germany 2:04:19.80
21 Anna Olasz, Hungary 2:04:21.20
22 Angelica Andre, Portugal 2:04:21.60
23 Fuwei Dong, China 2:04:24.50
24 Martina de Memme, Italy 2:04:26.10
25 Samantha Arevalo, Ecuador 2:04:28.80
26 Kalliopi Araouzou, Greece 2:04:29.00
27 Esmee Vermeulen, Netherlands 2:04:29.30
28 Minami Niikura, Japan 2:04:30.10
29 Sarah Bosslet, Germany 2:04:30.30
30 Chelsea Gubecka, Australia 2:04:30.50
31 Onon Katalin Somenek, Hungary 2:04:41.40
32 Angela Maurer, Germany 2:04:48.40
33 Viviane Jungblut, Brazil 2:04:52.60
34 Alice Dearing, Great Britain 2:05:25.50
35 Danielle Huskisson, Great Britain 2:06:01.90
36 Chase Travis, USA 2:06:07.60
37 Becca Mann, USA 2:06:18.40
38 Jeannette Spiwoks, Germany 2:07:03.80
39 Jordan White, Australia 2:07:04.20
40 Polly Isabella Holden, Great Britain 2:07:27.10
41 Krystyna Panchishko, Ukraine 2:07:56.20
42 Mariah Denigan, USA 2:08:34.80
43 Vasiliki Kadoglu, Bulgaria 2:09:48.30
44 Carla Goyanes Garcia, Spain 2:09:48.50
45 Alice Franco, Italy 2:10:01.60
46 Muran Tian, China 2:10:23.10
47 Yukimi Moriyama, Japan 2:10:27.60
48 Mira Szimcsak, Hungary 2:12:44.20
49 Luca Vas, Hungary 2:12:52.70
50 Yi-Chen Wang, Chinese Taipei 2:23:03.70
51 Aleyna Nur Sungur, Turkey 2:26:04.60
52 Hsin-Yi Fang, Chinese Taipei 2:29:05.70

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Colin Hill Shows Highlights From Doha - Men's 10 km





Courtesy of Colin Hill, Doha Bay, Qatar.

Florian Wellbrock of Germany won the opening race on the 2019 FINA Marathon Swim Series in Doha Bay, Qatar. With his victory, Wellbrock has joined Ferry Weertman as the odds-on favorites for winning the 2019 FINA World Championships in Korea this summer and qualifying for the 10 km swim at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Wellbrock beat Hungary’s Kristóf Rasovszky by 1.20 seconds, Jordan Wilimovsky of USA by 2.80 seconds, and 2016 1500m Olympic champion Gregorio Paltrinieri of Italy by 4.50 seconds in what may be a preview of Tokyo next year.

With a completely flat, very warm-water conditions expected in Tokyo, the fastest swimmers in the pool will also be favored in Tokyo - and swimmers like Wellbrock, Rasovszky, Wilimovsky and Paltrinieri are expected to be in the chase for podium positions along with defending Olympic champion Weertman.

For Australian swimmers Kai Graeme Edwards (5th) and Nicholas Sloman (7th) and former Wilimovsky age group teammate Brendan Casey of the USA (10th), their top 10 finishes are promising and show their preparations are going to plan.

10 km Results:
1 Florian Wellbrock, Germany 1:52:21.60
2 Kristóf Rasovszky, Hungary 1:52:22.80
3 Jordan Wilimovsky, USA 1:52:24.40
4 Gregorio Paltrinieri, Italy 1:52:26.10
5 Kai Graeme Edwards, Australia 1:52:27.30
6 Rob Muffels, Germany 1:52:29.40
7 Nicholas Sloman, Australia 1:52:29.60
8 Andreas Waschburger, Germany 1:52:32.40
9 Soeren Meissner, Germany 1:52:32.50
10 Brendan Casey, USA 1:52:33.20
11 Christian Reichert, Germany 1:52:33.90
12 Jack Burnell, Great Britain 1:52:34.30
13 Bailey Armstrong, Australia 1:52:34.80
14 Logan Vanhuys, Belgium 1:52:37.20
15 Matteo Furlan, Italy 1:52:38.70
16 Simone Ruffini, Italy 1:52:39.20
17 Allan do Carmo, Brazil 1:52:41.20
18 Guillem Pujol, Spain 1:52:41.60
19 Tobias Patrick Robinson, Great Britain 1:52:41.70
20 Alberto Martinez Murcia, Spain 1:52:43.70
21 Jiabao An, China 1:52:43.90
22 Hau-Li Fan, Canada 1:52:45.10
23 Andrea Bianchi, Italy 1:52:46.90
24 Hayden Paul Cotter, Australia 1:52:47.80
25 Daniel Szekelysi, Hungary 1:52:48.60
26 Victor Colonese, Brazil 1:52:49.60
27 Niklas Frach, Germany 1:52:50.10
28 Pol Gil, Spain 1:52:51.50
29 Diogo Villarinho, Brazil 1:52:52.20
30 Dario Verani, Italy 1:52:52.50
31 Esteban Enderica Salgado, Ecuador
1:52:57.60
32 Gordon John Mason, Great Britain 1:53:06.70
33 Athanasios Charalampos Kynigakis, Greece 1:53:23.00
34 David Brandl, Austria 1:53:32.00
35 Marcus Herwig, Germany 1:53:42.30
36 Mark Papp, Hungary 1:53:45.60
37 Ruoyu Wang, China 1:53:47.80
38 Yohsuke Miyamoto, Japan 1:53:48.20
39 Brennan Gravley, USA 1:53:50.50
40 Tiago Campos, Portugal 1:53:52.10
41 Peter Galicz, Hungary 1:53:53.20
42 David Heron, USA 1:53:56.60
43 Raul Santiago Betancor, Spain 1:53:57.60
44 Nicolas Masse-Savard, Canada 1:53:58.20
45 Vitaliy Khudyakov, Kazakhstan 1:53:58.40
46 Fernando Ponte, Brazil 1:53:59.30
47 Yunze Wang, China 1:54:00.10
48 Yosuke Aoki, Japan 1:54:00.60
49 Elliot Sodemann, Sweden 1:54:01.40
50 Eric Hedlin, Canada 1:54:01.50
51 Riku Kuwazoe, Japan 1:54:01.80
52 Bozhao Zhang, China 1:54:02.40
53 Rafael Gil, Portugal 1:54:03.80
54 Christian Keber, Germany 1:54:07.80
55 Igor Chervynskiy, Ukraine 1:54:10.10
56 David Castro, Ecuador 1:54:15.30
57 Jon Thomas McKay, Canada 1:54:22.90
58 Zhongyi Qiao, China 1:55:15.60
59 Cheng-Chi Cho, Chinese Taipei 1:55:45.60
60 Takeshi Toyoda, Japan 1:55:49.20
61 Taiki Nonaka, Japan 1:56:20.20
62 Federic Salghetti-Drioli, Switzerland 1:56:41.00
63 Lev Cherepanov, Kazakhstan 1:57:25.30
64 Evgenij Pop Acev, Macedonia 1:57:26.50
65 Jose Paula Carvalho, Portugal 2:00:50.10
66 Levente Selmeci, Hungary 2:03:11.40
67 Galymzhan Balabek, Kazakhstan 2:05:02.90
68 Kai-Wen Tseng, Chinese Taipei 2:05:29.90
69 Tzu-Cheng Liao, Chinese Taipei 2:07:26.80
DNF Mahmoud Aldadah, Palestine
DNF Ivan Enderica Ochoa, Ecuador
DNF David Farinango, Ecuador
DNF Kristian Kron, Sweden
DNF Andrea Manzi, Italy
DNF Batuhan Ecrin Pinar, Turkey
DNF Iyad Shama, Palestine
DNF Lijun Zu, China
DNF Kenessary Kenenbayev, Kazakhstan
DNF Abdelrahman Mohamed, Qatar
DNF Ahmad Samara, Qatar

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Martyn Webster Talks About His Barraesque Year

Courtesy of WOWSA, Lake Zurich, Switzerland.

Martyn Webster enjoyed and experienced a Barraesque year last year in 2018.

The 51-year-old British, one of the World's Top 50 Most Adventurous Swimmers, received the 2019 Barra Award for Most Outstanding Year of Marathon Swimming (all considered) from the Marathon Swimmers Federation.

* On April 14th, he completed a 14.4 km crossing of the Strait of Gibraltar from Spain to Morocco in 3 hours 51 minutes
* On May 27th, he completed a 26.4 km crossing of Lake Zurich in Switzerland in 8 hours 16 minutes
* On July 9th, he completed a 38.1 km crossing of Loch Awe in Scotland in 13 hours 30 minutes, the fourth in history
* On 5 August 5th, he finished 8th in the 26.4 km Lake Zurich Marathon Swim in Switzerland in 8 hours 51 minutes
* On August 28th, he completed a 33.8 km crossing of the English Channel from England to France in 12 hours 57 minutes
* On September 17th, he completed a 34.8 km crossing of Loch Lomond in Scotland in 12 hours 4 minutes
* He completed a crossing of the Walensee in Switzerland

The Yorkshireman who is originally from Leeds in the UK, is a brewer by training. "It is probably the best job in the world where I responsible for craft and speciality beers within the Carlsberg Group," says Webster who explains about his training and open water swimming decisions below:

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: It appears that you really did not get into marathon and channel swimming until your late 40’s. What prompted you to start swimming for such long distances?

Martyn Webster: I swam as a kid and up my late teens for the City of Leeds team and represented England and Great Britain at age-group level. But back in the late 1980s, I didn't feel I could really make the school/sport combination work and stopped swimming completely when I went to university. I didn't swim for 25 years in any sporting way while I focused on work and bringing up a family together with my wife. We also moved around a lot, living in many different countries, so for a long time, swimming was something consigned to the past.

Work took me back to the UK in 2007 and a friend suggested that I come down and train with the local masters group, Ilkley Swimming Club. I was shocked at how unfit I had become, but I liked the training, the camaraderie and being part of a club. I think it was 2011 that I tried my first open water swimming 1500m race, having never swum open water before. I just enjoyed it so much that I just looked for more opportunities to do open water swimming events. The UK is blessed with open water swimming events with many over the summer months. Between 2011 and 2014, I did lots of small swims and gradually increased the distances up to 10 km. The longer the distance, the more comfortable I felt.

Long distance marathon swimming became an idea when I started commuting to Switzerland for work in 2012. I decided to enter thinking it would be a good challenge for the year, but not knowing at the time it would take me three attempts/years to get a place - everyone's been there!

I finally got a spot in 2015. I enjoyed the Rapperswil to Zurich swim so much it prompted me to think about the English Channel.

Each marathon swim since the first Zurich swim has just been a progression to the next level and preparing for and swimming the English Channel in 2016 gave me the confidence that I can swim most swims on a good day.

I didn't even know there was this world of long distance swimming out there really until I started training for English Channel in 2016 so most of the swims I have done have been a result of someone I have met along the journey, who has said, "We have a great swim here, you should come and do it!"

The Catalina Channel and 20 Bridges in New York City were exactly like that.

But having now been part of this community for a few years now, I am just in awe and inspired by what people are doing. Meeting other swimmers and supporters and seeing and hearing about the fantastic things they are doing is the inspiration to do more.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Where do you train?

Martyn Webster: Mostly in Lake Zurich and the two local open pools in Rapperswil or Ruti or the Olympic Pool in Uster. All between Rapperswil and Zurich.

I train alone most of the time. But at weekends with the Lake, Cake and Coffee Club. A small band of open water swimmers who swim in Lake Zurich year round. Something. In the summer, we alternate swims mainly around the Lake Zurich areas and swim in Enge, Uttoquai, Meilen or Rapperswil and then when the official swim season finishes mid September, swim mainly Enge in Zurich or Meilen.

I also start of each OWS season with a SwimTrek camp in Mallorca in spring. I learned so much from the guides there. Now I go back because its an integral part of the preparation I do for long swims and I just like to be around people with similar goals and mindset.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: How (long) do you train each day or week?

Martyn Webster: I have a routine where I work on monthly targets. Traveling with work most weeks means I have to vary my daily and weekly plans quite a lot so I try and fit in sessions where possible.

From November to January, I only swim 40-50 km a month while focused on drills and stroke work with 3-4 km maximum per session. Most sessions last an hour.

From February to April, I start to ramp up with more pace and interval work with long swims thrown in every 2 weeks. I aim to hit 100 km in April. When the temperature hits 12°C, then I move the distance work to the lake.

From May to September, I am holding 100-110 km a month including events that I am doing mostly in the lake with the occasional interval or pace session in the pool.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: What are some of your favorite workouts?

Martyn Webster: In the pool, I like 200m or 400m interval sets in the pool holding pace.

In the lake, the 10 km swim from Schmerikon to Rapperswil on the Obersee, I do this 3 or 4 times in the season. Both are good yardsticks to measure how on track I am to my targets for the year.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Of all your swims last year, what was your most difficult swim, your easiest swim, your most memorable swim?

Martyn Webster: Loch Lomond was the most difficult: 35 km and 12 hours at 13°C was a big ask physically and mentally, especially after all the other swims this year. Everything cramped at some point during that swim.

The easiest and most memorable swim was the Strait of Gibraltar. I swam with a friend of mine, Dave Owen. We waited 6 days to swim this and thought we were going home without a swim. We got a window of 4 hours and nailed it. Swim with someone else is so enjoyable.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Have you ever thought about quitting during a swim? If so, what do you do to get over that thought?

Martyn Webster: Sure! My strategy is denial. I'm not really going to swim 38 km. I'm always swimming to the next feed. Also having swum a few long swims now, I know I am going to him bad batches and I know I can swim through and get a second or third wind and keep going.

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: What do you like drinking or eating during a swim?

Martyn Webster: Probably the same as most. Maltodextrin drink hourly to 4 hours and then half hourly. 6 - 7 hours in, I switch to starch-based carb drink and solids like bananas, tinned peaches the odd chocolate roll or jelly babies.

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: If you had unlimited time and an unlimited budget, where would you swim in any given year?

Martyn Webster: The list is long. My wife might divorce me if I put my plans on paper, but I think over the years I would like to swim most of the Swiss lakes.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Monday, February 18, 2019

The 2019 Frogman Series

Courtesy of Rory O'Connor, Boston, Massachusetts.

The Navy SEAL Foundation Frogman Swim Series includes the original Tampa Bay Frogman Swim in Florida, the 3rd annual San Francisco Frogman Swim, and the inaugural Boston Frogman Swim that will be held June 2nd.

Rory O'Connor explains, "These swims are first and foremost fundraising events with all proceeds going to the Navy SEAL Foundation that consistently receives the highest ratings for its stewardship of money raised and deployed to its mission.

The Frogman Swim Series strives to build national awareness of the Naval Special Warfare community and support the Navy SEAL Foundation whose mission is to provide immediate and ongoing support and assistance to the Naval Special Warfare community and their families.

The swims present a challenging endeavor to provide a small reminder of the hardships endured by our elite and silent warriors while encouraging others to support and donate to the cause
."

For more information, visit www.bostonfrogman.com and www.sanfranciscofrogman.com and www.tampabayfrogman.com.

Photo shows Sean Doolittle won the Tampa Bay Frogman Swim three years in a row in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Philippe Fort Goes Long, Goes Cold To Join Iron Icemen

Courtesy of WOWSA, Volendam, Netherlands.

Philippe Fort, a 54-year-old French athlete, recently became one of the few humans in history to achieve Iron Iceman status by completing both a certified Ice Mile by the International Ice Swimming Association and a full Ironman triathlon (3 times) in Nice, France.

After completing the Ironman Nice in 2005 (in 12 hours 27 minutes), 2007 (in 11 hours 48 minutes), and 2008 (in 12 hours 42 minutes), Fort got more serious in the open water.

He participated in a number of channel relays and four Ice Kilometer races including at the 2017 and 2018 Ice Swimming Aqua Sphere World Championships in Burghausen, Germany as well as completing an Ice Mile in Volendam, Netherlands in 4.97°C water.

His Ice Mile time was 29:38 in the 4.00°C water under the observation by Christa Hesterman and Alain Vial.

With his Ice Mile and 3 full Ironman triathlons, Fort joins the following Iron Icemen and Iron Icewomen in an exclusive crowd of athletic adventurers:

* Kellie Joyce Latimer‪ (USA)
‪* Jaimie Monahan‪ (USA)
* Claire Bustin-Mulkern‪ (UK)
‪* Conny Prasser‪ (Germany)
* Corinna Nolan (Ireland)
* Elina Mäkinen (Finland)
‪* Paul Fowler‪ (UK)
‪* John Dyer‪ (UK)
‪* Cerys Thomas‪ (Gibraltar)
* ‪Paolo Chiarino‪ (Italy)
‪* Stuart Hinde‪ (UK)
* Kieron Palframan (South Africa)
‪* Leszek Naziemiec‪ (Poland)
* David Coleman‪ (New Zealand)
‪* Pádraig Mallon‪ (Ireland)
* Mark Hannigan (Ireland)
* Christof Wandratsch (Germany)
* Andrew Ainge (UK)
* Graeme Flitcroft (UK)
* Noel Grimes (Ireland)
* Ger Kennedy (Ireland)
* Stefan Jung (Germany)
* Uli Munz (Germany)
* Philippe Fort (France)

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Lewis Pugh To Speak At International Marine Conference

Courtesy of WOWSA, Glasgow, Scotland.

Lewis Pugh, the United Nations Patron of the Oceans, will give the keynote speech to a sold-out crowd at Scotland's International Marine Conference on February 20th at the University of Strathclyde, Technology and Innovation Centre in Glasgow, Scotland.

Scotland's vision is for clean, healthy, safe, productive and diverse seas that are managed to meet the long-term needs of nature and people. This is only achievable through strong national action and international cooperation.

The conference will focus on current national and international actions to protect the marine environment including the following topics:

Day 1
* International Ocean Governance
* Clean and Healthy Seas
* Biologically Diverse Seas
* Productive and Sustainably Used Seas
* Climate Change

Day 2
* Promoting Behaviour Change
* Marine Sector Litter
* Marine Litter Sinks
* Citizen Science
* Microplastic & Microfibres
* Marine Spatial Planning Challenge
* Stemming The Flow Of Plastics; The Circular Economy
* Innovation
* International Working
* Community Action
* Pre-production Plastics (Nurdles)
* Sewage Related Debris
* Young People's Workshop and Panel
* Marine Spatial Planning Challenge

For more information on the sold-out conference, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sunday, February 17, 2019

Ana Marcela Cunha Sets The Pace Going To Korea & Tokyo

Courtesy of WOWSA, Doha Bay, Qatar.

Disappointed in 2008, 2012 and 2016, Ana Marcela Cunha got off to an excellent start in the build-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics with a victory on the opening stop on the 2019 FINA Marathon Swim Series.

With her victory, the Brazilian dynamo is most definitely one of the odds-on favorites for winning the 2019 FINA World Championships in South Korea this summer and qualifying for the 10 km swim at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Cunha beat an emerging Kareena Lee of Australia by 0.40 seconds, 2016 silver medalist Rachele Bruni of Italy by 1.50 seconds, and 2012 silver medalist Haley Anderson by 3.90 seconds in Qatar.

The race in Doha Bay may be a preview of the Olympic final in Tokyo next year.

With a completely flat, very warm-water conditions expected in Tokyo, the race will be close - with 2016 Olympic champion Sharon van Rouwendaal and France's Aurélie Muller also expected to be racing in the lead pack.

10 km Results:
1 Ana Marcela Cunha, Brazil 2:03:51.50
2 Kareena Lee, Australia 2:03:52.00
3 Rachele Bruni, Italy 2:03:53.00
4 Haley Anderson, USA 2:03:55.40
5 Leonie Beck, Germany 2:03:55.80
6 Giulia Gabbrielleschi, Italy 2:03:58.20
7 Yawen Hou, China 2:03:59.00
8 Arianna Bridi, Italy 2:04:00.20
9 Hannah Moore, USA 2:04:00.30
10 Ashley Twichell, USA 2:04:01.60
11 Chloe Gubecka, Australia 2:04:03.50
12 Sharon van Rouwendaal, Netherlands 2:04:05.20
13 Finnia Wunram, Germany 2:04:05.50
14 Erica Sullivan, USA 2:04:09.30
15 Reka Rohacs, Hungary 2:04:12.30
16 Katy Campbell, USA 2:04:12.60
17 Mackenzie Brazier, Australia 2:04:13.20
18 Xin Xin, China 2:04:16.80
19 Paula Ruiz, Spain 2:04:18.40
20 Lea Boy, Germany 2:04:19.80
21 Anna Olasz, Hungary 2:04:21.20
22 Angelica Andre, Portugal 2:04:21.60
23 Fuwei Dong, China 2:04:24.50
24 Martina de Memme, Italy 2:04:26.10
25 Samantha Arevalo, Ecuador 2:04:28.80
26 Kalliopi Araouzou, Greece 2:04:29.00
27 Esmee Vermeulen, Netherlands 2:04:29.30
28 Minami Niikura, Japan 2:04:30.10
29 Sarah Bosslet, Germany 2:04:30.30
30 Chelsea Gubecka, Australia 2:04:30.50
31 Onon Katalin Somenek, Hungary 2:04:41.40
32 Angela Maurer, Germany 2:04:48.40
33 Viviane Jungblut, Brazil 2:04:52.60
34 Alice Dearing, Great Britain 2:05:25.50
35 Danielle Huskisson, Great Britain 2:06:01.90
36 Chase Travis, USA 2:06:07.60
37 Becca Mann, USA 2:06:18.40
38 Jeannette Spiwoks, Germany 2:07:03.80
39 Jordan White, Australia 2:07:04.20
40 Polly Isabella Holden, Great Britain 2:07:27.10
41 Krystyna Panchishko, Ukraine 2:07:56.20
42 Mariah Denigan, USA 2:08:34.80
43 Vasiliki Kadoglu, Bulgaria 2:09:48.30
44 Carla Goyanes Garcia, Spain 2:09:48.50
45 Alice Franco, Italy 2:10:01.60
46 Muran Tian, China 2:10:23.10
47 Yukimi Moriyama, Japan 2:10:27.60
48 Mira Szimcsak, Hungary 2:12:44.20
49 Luca Vas, Hungary 2:12:52.70
50 Yi-Chen Wang, Chinese Taipei 2:23:03.70
51 Aleyna Nur Sungur, Turkey 2:26:04.60
52 Hsin-Yi Fang, Chinese Taipei 2:29:05.70

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Florian Wellbrock Sets The Bar, Wins In Doha

Photo of Rob Muffels, Florian Wellbrock and Marcus Herwig courtesy by Eroll Popova.

Leading a strong German finish with 4 swimmers in the top 10, Florian Wellbrock of Germany won the opening stop on the 2019 FINA Marathon Swim Series in Doha Bay, Qatar minus Olympic 10 km champion Ferry Weertman. With his victory, Wellbrock has joined Ferry Weertman as the odds-on favorites for winning the 2019 FINA World Championships in Korea this summer and qualifying for the 10 km swim at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Wellbrock beat Hungary’s Kristóf Rasovszky by 1.20 seconds, Jordan Wilimovsky of USA by 2.80 seconds, and 2016 1500m Olympic champion Gregorio Paltrinieri of Italy by 4.50 seconds in what may be a preview of Tokyo next year.

With a completely flat, very warm-water conditions expected in Tokyo, the fastest swimmers in the pool will also be favored in Tokyo - and swimmers like Wellbrock, Rasovszky, Wilimovsky and Paltrinieri are expected to be in the chase for podium positions along with defending Olympic champion Weertman.

For Australian swimmers Kai Graeme Edwards (5th) and Nicholas Sloman (7th) and former Wilimovsky age group teammate Brendan Casey of the USA (10th), their top 10 finishes are promising and show their preparations are going to plan.

10 km Results:
1 Florian Wellbrock, Germany 1:52:21.60
2 Kristóf Rasovszky, Hungary 1:52:22.80
3 Jordan Wilimovsky, USA 1:52:24.40
4 Gregorio Paltrinieri, Italy 1:52:26.10
5 Kai Graeme Edwards, Australia 1:52:27.30
6 Rob Muffels, Germany 1:52:29.40
7 Nicholas Sloman, Australia 1:52:29.60
8 Andreas Waschburger, Germany 1:52:32.40
9 Soeren Meissner, Germany 1:52:32.50
10 Brendan Casey, USA 1:52:33.20
11 Christian Reichert, Germany 1:52:33.90
12 Jack Burnell, Great Britain 1:52:34.30
13 Bailey Armstrong, Australia 1:52:34.80
14 Logan Vanhuys, Belgium 1:52:37.20
15 Matteo Furlan, Italy 1:52:38.70
16 Simone Ruffini, Italy 1:52:39.20
17 Allan do Carmo, Brazil 1:52:41.20
18 Guillem Pujol, Spain 1:52:41.60
19 Tobias Patrick Robinson, Great Britain 1:52:41.70
20 Alberto Martinez Murcia, Spain 1:52:43.70
21 Jiabao An, China 1:52:43.90
22 Hau-Li Fan, Canada 1:52:45.10
23 Andrea Bianchi, Italy 1:52:46.90
24 Hayden Paul Cotter, Australia 1:52:47.80
25 Daniel Szekelysi, Hungary 1:52:48.60
26 Victor Colonese, Brazil 1:52:49.60
27 Niklas Frach, Germany 1:52:50.10
28 Pol Gil, Spain 1:52:51.50
29 Diogo Villarinho, Brazil 1:52:52.20
30 Dario Verani, Italy 1:52:52.50
31 Esteban Enderica Salgado, Ecuador
1:52:57.60
32 Gordon John Mason, Great Britain 1:53:06.70
33 Athanasios Charalampos Kynigakis, Greece 1:53:23.00
34 David Brandl, Austria 1:53:32.00
35 Marcus Herwig, Germany 1:53:42.30
36 Mark Papp, Hungary 1:53:45.60
37 Ruoyu Wang, China 1:53:47.80
38 Yohsuke Miyamoto, Japan 1:53:48.20
39 Brennan Gravley, USA 1:53:50.50
40 Tiago Campos, Portugal 1:53:52.10
41 Peter Galicz, Hungary 1:53:53.20
42 David Heron, USA 1:53:56.60
43 Raul Santiago Betancor, Spain 1:53:57.60
44 Nicolas Masse-Savard, Canada 1:53:58.20
45 Vitaliy Khudyakov, Kazakhstan 1:53:58.40
46 Fernando Ponte, Brazil 1:53:59.30
47 Yunze Wang, China 1:54:00.10
48 Yosuke Aoki, Japan 1:54:00.60
49 Elliot Sodemann, Sweden 1:54:01.40
50 Eric Hedlin, Canada 1:54:01.50
51 Riku Kuwazoe, Japan 1:54:01.80
52 Bozhao Zhang, China 1:54:02.40
53 Rafael Gil, Portugal 1:54:03.80
54 Christian Keber, Germany 1:54:07.80
55 Igor Chervynskiy, Ukraine 1:54:10.10
56 David Castro, Ecuador 1:54:15.30
57 Jon Thomas McKay, Canada 1:54:22.90
58 Zhongyi Qiao, China 1:55:15.60
59 Cheng-Chi Cho, Chinese Taipei 1:55:45.60
60 Takeshi Toyoda, Japan 1:55:49.20
61 Taiki Nonaka, Japan 1:56:20.20
62 Federic Salghetti-Drioli, Switzerland 1:56:41.00
63 Lev Cherepanov, Kazakhstan 1:57:25.30
64 Evgenij Pop Acev, Macedonia 1:57:26.50
65 Jose Paula Carvalho, Portugal 2:00:50.10
66 Levente Selmeci, Hungary 2:03:11.40
67 Galymzhan Balabek, Kazakhstan 2:05:02.90
68 Kai-Wen Tseng, Chinese Taipei 2:05:29.90
69 Tzu-Cheng Liao, Chinese Taipei 2:07:26.80
DNF Mahmoud Aldadah, Palestine
DNF Ivan Enderica Ochoa, Ecuador
DNF David Farinango, Ecuador
DNF Kristian Kron, Sweden
DNF Andrea Manzi, Italy
DNF Batuhan Ecrin Pinar, Turkey
DNF Iyad Shama, Palestine
DNF Lijun Zu, China
DNF Kenessary Kenenbayev, Kazakhstan
DNF Abdelrahman Mohamed, Qatar
DNF Ahmad Samara, Qatar

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, February 16, 2019

Boring versus Bold for 2028 Los Angeles Olympics

Courtesy of WOWSA, Southern California.

It was great for the International Olympic Committee to include the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in the 2008 Beijing Olympics,” recalls Steven Munatones.

“The four-loop course ended up in triumphant fashion for leukemia survivor Maarten van der Weijden of the Netherlands and Russian superstar Larisa Ilchenko who both won gold with a fantastic sprint to the finish.

Fans were seated on long sides of the rectangular 2.5 km man-made rowing course and coaches walked along the banks in front of a worldwide audience.”

From Beijing, the IOC and FINA family moved towards the Serpentine at the 2012 London Olympics where Oussama Mellouli of Tunisia and Éva Risztov of Hungary executed flawless strategies to win gold in the six 1.6 km course where the banks were crowded with spectators.

From the confines of central London, the marathon swimmers found themselves racing well offshore in Copacabana Beach at the 2016 Rio Olympics. The women’s race was dominated by Sharon van Rouwendaal of the Netherlands while Dutch teammate Ferry Weertman pulled off a tremendous comeback and out-touched Spyridon Gianniotis of Greece in the first ocean swimming venue in Olympic history. The course was a geometric loop that ended where it started.

From Copacabana Beach, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics will be held in Odaiba Beach in a very warm, very flat, four-loop course where the only ripples will be caused by the swimmers and the only waves will be caused by the officials’ and media boats.

What I especially like about the possible venues for the 2028 Los Angeles Olympics is to finally have a point-to-point course that can showcase the California shoreline, the Los Angeles basin, boat harbors on one side and Catalina Island and the wide expanse of the Pacific Ocean on the other side,” muses Munatones.

If FINA and the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee think outside the box and wish to showcase Los Angeles in an innovative and beautiful manner, they could set a point-to-point swim course.

It would start on Rancho Palos Verdes coast – allowing the athletes to start just below the Trump National Golf Club Los Angeles right above Terranea with beautiful cliffs on either side and then head either north or south and finish either in Redondo Beach or Santa Monica or near the Queen Mary in Long Beach.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of yachts, boats, stand-up paddlers, kayakers, and paddle boarders and kite boarders could follow the swimmers along the point-to-point course – of course, outside the safety zone established by the FINA race officials. The revelry and majesty of showing the pack of the world’s fastest open water swimmers sandwiched between the California course and a huge flotilla of cheering spectators on the Pacific Ocean would showcase the sport unlike the loop courses of Beijing, London, Rio de Janeiro and Tokyo.

I could think of no other course in Los Angeles that would present such marine beauty and environmental challenges like ocean swells, currents and turbulence and marine life for the marathon swimmers. A simple four-loop course set in a sedate, calm bay, harbor or rowing basin would seem to completely shortchange the possibilities.

Additionally, the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim courses in Tokyo, at the 2024 Paris Olympics and in Los Angeles in 2028 will be broadcast with drones and aerial footage. That is great.

But the clarity of the coastal Pacific Ocean water at this potential 2028 Los Angeles Olympics marathon swim course would also enable underwater footage. Imagine a television audience watching the athletes both from an aerial perspective as well as from an underwater perspective. imagine the swimmers being filmed from above and below where viewers can see the silhouettes of swimmers amid the dramatic kelp forests off the Palos Verdes coastline with sea lions that dart in and out of these areas.

It would be like an Olympic swimming race like no other
.”

But is FINA and the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee capable of such vision and innovation?

I am hopeful that a beautiful point-to-point 10 km marathon swimming course along the Seine through Paris at the 2024 Olympics will help spur the creativity of FINA and the Los Angeles organizers,” said a wishful Munatones.

A beautiful coastline.

Clear, dramatic underwater perspectives from the Pacific Ocean.

Marine life swimming underneath the marathon swimmers.

A gigantic flotilla of boaters and paddlers cheering along the entire course.

A point-to-point race makes all the sense in the world for the 2028 Los Angeles Olympic Games 10 km marathon swim course.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, February 15, 2019

Starts And Turns In Ice Swimming Competitions

Courtesy of International Ice Swimming Association, Murmansk, Russia.

In the competitive ice swimming world, there are specific rules that dictate the starts and turns in order to ensure fairness and uniform procedures in the sport.

The illustration on the left shows the acceptable and unacceptable ways to start a race with one hand on the wall at the water's edge. Jumping in or diving into the water is not done.

Similarly, flip turns and long streamlining underwater on the turns are not allowed; only hand-touch open turns.

Onwards to Murmansk, Russia where the International Ice Swimming World Championships were held in 2013 and 2015.



Henri Kaarma shows his open turns during the 100m freestyle finals held inside the Arctic Circle at the Winter Swimming Championships in Murmansk.



For more information on the 2019 International Ice Swimming Association World Championships in Murmansk, visit www.internationaliceswimming.com with the race schedule posted here.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Drug Testing In The English Channel

Courtesy of CSA, English Channel.

The Channel Swimming Association has governed solo and relay crossings between the 33.8 km channel between England and France since 1927 and has implemented a drug testing policy since 2015.

Michael Read MBE, president of the Channel Swimming Association, explains, "We believe that it is terribly important that our swimmers, especially the younger ones, who have a lifetime of swimming ahead of them, understand that they must be clean, there is no place for drugs in our sport, and that drugs are totally unnecessary for the fulfilment of our sport.

Consequently, we make no secret of the fact that if you swim with the Channel Swimming Association (CSA), you stand a fair chance of being drug tested
."

Currently, there is about a one in six chance that swimmers are tested.

Read, who has swum across the English Channel 33 times himself over the course of his career, answered questions about the CSA drug policy:

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Under the new CSA policy, English Channel swimmers may be requested to submit themselves to a drug test within 24 hours of their swim. How specifically are these athletes selected? Are they selected randomly or must everyone comply?

Michael Read MBE: In theory, the testing is completely at random. But high profile swimmers such a swimmer looking for a record are more likely and probably have a greater chance to be invited to produce a sample.

By accepting to swim under Channel Swimming Association rules, swimmers agree to accept to be tested.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Are there any medical exemptions? So, for example, if a physician writes that an athlete is asthmatic, then the athlete can take asthma medicine. But athletes must have a written medical exemptions for a licensed physician.

Michael Read MBE: Yes, absolutely.

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: What is the form and protocols of the test? A urine test overseen by a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) official and tested in an accredited testing laboratory?

Michael Read MBE: A urine or saliva test, usually on arrival back in port. Testing saliva is less personal, less invasive and is easy for both the officer and the swimmer.

We have our own drug testing officer who welcomes swimmers ashore on their arrival to seek their compliance. We did look into the possibility of going down the WADA route, but who was going to meet a boat at Folkestone Harbour at 3 am in the morning? They want athletes to give samples when it is convenient to them; we wanted a test straight after a swim. We also wanted something quick, simple, convenient and transparent to both parties. There was also the question of cost and speed of a sample going down the WADA route, which we estimated at a very considerable sum and certainly not instantaneous. Our system is convenient, affordable, effective, quick, easy, and enables us to test a reasonable proportion of swimmers without impacting on registration fees and the effective running of our sport.


Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Will their swims be unrecognized or disqualified as a result of a positive drug test? Or is there an appeal and retesting process in place?

Michael Read MBE: Yes, unless we can be shown to be at fault. Basically, they will not be ratified and the swimmer is warned that that will be the case. A failure would result in an immediate retest; the drug testing kits that we use give an instant result and are comprehensive for a wide range of performance enhancing drugs..

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Are there any review or protest procedures if the athlete does not accept or agree with a positive drug test?

Michael Read MBE: When registering their swim, swimmers agree to comply with our rules. If a problem should arise, we would go back to the swimmer's doctor and to the drug testing kit supplier for initial guidance. It is up to the swimmer to declare any drugs which are likely to result in a positive drug test on their CSA medical form.

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Is all this information dealt with confidentially with the athlete?

Michael Read MBE: It is dealt with confidentially with the swimmer, but 12-15% of all swims completed since 2015 have had a drug test, so I doubt if it is much of a secret. I am sure that many of the swimmers see it as a positive step and openly talk about it; not only did I swim the Channel, but I was also drug tested and everything was in order. This is especially the case where a record could be at stake. For instance, I can reveal that the oldest team to ever swim the Channel (the Septuagenarians) had at least one member drug tested and he was clean. We see it as a positive development for our sport, where swimmers will actually want to be tested and will be disappointed if they are not.

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Will positive test results be made public as a deterrent to other drug takers?

Michael Read MBE: I am pleased to say that no one has failed the test, but if they did, whilst we might not make it public, it would get mentioned in the annual report that we had had a positive test and a swimmer would be left explaining why his or her apparently successful swim had not been ratified. This might not be a great issue for someone who has kept the news of their anticipated swim under wraps, but for someone who has broadcasted it world wide in the months leading up to the event, it could certainly be an embarrassment..

For more information, visit the Channel Swimming Association website here.

The Channel Swimming Association organization is as follows:

* President: Michael Read MBE
* Vice Presidents: Dr. Harry Huffaker, Dr. Stanley Paris, Ray Cossum, Ghislaine Van Vooren, Tom Watch and Joan Metcalfe
* Executive Board Members: Chairman Peter Van Vooren, Vice Chairman Clive Burbage, Administrative Secretary Susan Ractliffe
* Administrative Secretary: Susan Ractliffe
* Board of Director Members: Fiona Southwell, Marc Newman, Peter May, Enrique Flores

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimmin'Palmaria Around Italian Riviera


Courtesy of Benini Matteo, Liguria, Italy.

Since 1896, La Rari Nantes Spezia has experience in open water swimming in northwest Italy along the Italian Riviera.

Swimmin'Palmaria is a 3 km circumnavigation swim around Palmaria Island (Isola Palmaria) in Italy.

Palmaria Island is the only inhabited island of Liguria, is located in front of the village of Portovenere and forms a small archipelago that includes the islet of Tino and Tinetto.

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Dr. Caroline Block Wins MSF Monahan Award

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Dr. Caroline Block won the inaugural MSF Monahan Award that recognizes an outstanding and original series of marathon swims achieved over the past four years.

The four years have been a whirlwind of activity for the anthropologist from New York.

She participated in the 2016 Memphremagog Winter Swimming Festival, 2016 and 2017 U.S. Winter Swimming Association National Championships, and the 2016 20 Bridges Manhattan Swim in 8 hours 48 minutes, completed a 35 km crossing of the North Channel from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 14 hours 31 minutes, completed a 33.8 km crossing of the English Channel in 11 hours 52 minutes, completed a 16 km Verrazano Bridge to Marine Parkway in 3 hours 40 minutes as a test swim for Coney Island Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers, attempted an unprecedented two-way crossing of the North Channel between Northern Ireland and Scotland where her first leg from Northern Ireland to Scotland was 15 hours 32 minutes, completed a 51.8 km crossing of Lake George in 19 hours 21 minutes to set a women's record, finished the 2017 7.5 km Battle of Carlingford Lough in 1 hour 54 minutes, completed a 56 km crossing of Lake Cayuga in New York in 21 hours 36 minutes, attempted history's second two-way attempt of the North Channel from Northern Ireland to Scotland to Northern Ireland that was aborted after 25 hours 58 minutes and 61.2 km where she completed her third career one-way crossing from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 16 hours 45 minutes, became the first woman and second individual overall to swim 44.3 km from Santa Rosa Island to the California mainland in 20 hours 36 minutes, and completed a 30.5 km crossing from the California mainland to Santa Rosa Island in 14 hours 56 minutes in 2018.

Dr. Block is shown on left swimming across the North Channel from Northern Ireland to Scotland in 14 hours 31 minutes.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

2019 EDF Aqua Challenge Series

Courtesy of Loïc Branda, Swim the Riviera, France.

Traversée de Nice à la Nage (Prom'Swim) is an open water swim in the Baies de Anges of Nice, France and is part of the 2019 EDF Aqua Challenge series. The series is officially organized by the Fédération Française Natation.

The Prom'Swim - part of the Swim the Riviera - is held in September.

It offers one of the largest 10 km marathon swimming competitions in the world with more than 300 swimmers expected to compete.

The races are growing; the minimum number of participants are noted below:

L’EDF Aqua Challenge 2019
June 8th - 9th: La Drakkar à Rouen in La Seine, Rouen, 1.5 km, 3 km with 500 swimmers in Base de Loisirs de Bédanne
June 15th: BoccaCabana Cup - EDF Aqua Challenge Cannes in Cannes, 2.5 km, 5 km, and 3x500m relay with 500 swimmers
June 21st - 23rd: Le Défi Monte-Cristo in Marseille, 1 km, 2.5 km, 3.5 km, and 5 km with 5,500 swimmers
June 23rd: La Traversée de Bordeaux à la Nage in Garonne, Bordeaux, 1.7 km with 600 swimmers
June 30th: EDF Aqua Challenge Toulouse in Garonne, Bordeaux]], 500m, 1.5 km, 3 km, and 5 km with 400 swimmers
July 27th - 28th: Les Défis Quiberonnais in Quiberon, 500m, 1.5 km, 3 km, 7.5 km with 1,000 swimmers
August 15th: La Traversée du Lac (Traversée du Lac d'Annecy) in Annecy, 500m, 1 km, 2.4 km, and 5 km with 1,900 swimmers
1 September 1st: Le Trophée Martigues Etang de Berre in Martigues, 500m and 5 km with 400 swimmers
September 14th - 15th: EDF Aqua Challenge Paris in Paris, 1.25 km, 2.5 km and 5 km with 1,800 swimmers
September: 20th - 22nd: La PromSwim in Nice, 500m, 1 km, 2 km, 5 km and 10 km with 2,000 swimmers

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, February 14, 2019

Gar Woods Polar Bear Swim Hits 31

Courtesy of WOWSA, Lake Tahoe, California.

The Gar Woods Polar Bear Swim is in its 31st year up in Lake Tahoe, California.

The 31st edition of cold water swimming is part of North Lake Tahoe SnowFest, the annual Mardi Gras in the Sierra Nevada mountains.

It is one of the world's longest running high-altitude swims that are defined as open water swims held at least 1,000 meters above sea level:

1,400 meters (4,593 feet): 1.6 km Speedo Ice Swim Africa in Nuwedam, Fraserburg, Northern Cape in South Africa

1,511 meters (4,957 feet): 1.93 km and 3.86 km Mountain Swim Series Solstice Sunset Swim in Union Reservoir (Calkins Lake) in Longmont, Colorado, USA

1,624 meters (5,328 feet): 1.6 km, 3.2 km and 4.8 km BAM Bare Bones Open Water Swim Series at the Boulder Reservoir in Boulder, Colorado, USA


1,624 meters (5,328 feet): 300m, 700m, 950m and 1 km BAM Bi-Weekly Open Water Swims near Dream Cove at the Boulder Reservoir in Boulder, Colorado, USA

1,654 meters (5,427 feet): 1.6 km and 3.2 km Mountain Swim Series Chatfield Classic in Hatfield Lake in Littleton, Colorado, USA

1,676 meters (5,500 feet): 6.43 km Sierra Nevada Open Water 4 MS by Richard Gardner across Shaver Lake in the Sierra National Forest of Fresno County, California, USA

1,756 meters (5,760 feet): 4.82 km Mountain Swim Series Carter Lake Crossing in Carter Lake Reservoir in Loveland, Colorado, USA

1,897 meters (6,224 feet): 250m Gar Woods Polar Bear Swim in Lake Tahoe, California, USA

1,897 meters (6,224 feet): 16.1 km Olympic Club Trans Tahoe Relay in Lake Tahoe, California, USA

1,897 meters (6,224 feet): 16.9 km Vikingsholm Swim between Cave Rock in Nevada and Emerald Bay in Lake Tahoe, California, USA

1,897 meters (6,224 feet): 19.3 km true widthwise swim across Lake Tahoe between California and Nevada, USA

1,897 meters (6,224 feet): 34.3 km Lake Tahoe lengthwise swim across Lake Tahoe, California, USA

1,676 meters (5,500 feet): 6.43 km Sierra Nevada Open Water 4 MS by Richard Gardner across Shaver Lake in the Sierra National Forest of Fresno County, California, USA

2,323 meters (7,621 feet): 2.25 km Sierra Nevada Open Water 4 MS by Richard Gardner across June Lake in Inyo National Forest, Mono County, California, USA

2,425 meters (7,957 feet): 1.5 km loops (repeated until failure) Mountain Swim Series Cliff Backyard Ultra Swim in Wellington Lake in Bailey, Colorado, USA

2,425 meters (7,957 feet): 5 km and 10 km Mountain Swim Series Castle 5K/10K in Wellington Lake in Bailey, Colorado, USA

3,000 meters (9,842 feet): 1 km Winter Swimming Ski Portillo Chile (Festival Internacional de Natación de Invierno en Argentina) in the Andes Mountains, Argentina

3,048 meters (10,000 feet): 1 km South African Ice Swimming Championships in Afriski, Lesotho

3,812 meters (12,507 feet): 7 km Torneo Internacional de Natación en Aguas Abiertas (Nadando Cerca del Cielo) in Lago Titicaca from the Isla de la Luna to the Isla del Sol in Bolivia

3,812 meters (12,507 feet): 16 km by Lynne Cox in Lago Titicaca from Copacabana, Bolivia to Chimbo, Peru

5,200 meters (17,060 feet): 1 km in Lake Pumori on Mount Everest in the Nepal - Tibet border

5,909 meters (19,386 feet): Ojos Swim by Madswimmers Jean Craven, Juandre Human, Milton Brest, Evan Feldman, Chris Marthinusen, Herman van der Westhuizen and Robert Graaff across Ojos del Salado in Mount Tres Cruces on the border of Chile and Argentina in the Andes Mountains

There most probably will be an increasingly number of high-altitude swims around the world.

National Geographic reported, "Lakes across the globe that once froze solid all winter are melting faster than ever before and, in some cases, are not freezing at all" after visiting 513 lakes throughout the Northern Hemisphere to assess how their patterns of freezing and thawing had changed since 1970."

Researchers estimated that 15,000 lakes around the world already freeze less than they used to and lake ice could become scarce within the next generation, permanently canceling winter activities such as ice skating and ice fishing - and increasing the number of ice swimming and high-altitude swimming events, wild swims and challenges.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

From 14 To 43 In Doha

Courtesy of FINA, Doha, Qatar.

A pair of 14-year-olds - Mira Szimcsak of Hungary and Hsin-Yi Fang of Taiwan - are going to mix it up with 43-year-old Olympian Angela Maurer of Germany and the world's fastest open water swimmers in Doha Bay, Qatar.

The 2019 FINA Marathon Swim World Series kicks off this Saturday, February 16th in Doha Bay, Qatar.

The event is live streamed on FINAtv with the women's race at 9:00am (GMT+3) and the men's race at starting at 1:00pm (GMT+3) along Doha’s stunning Corniche, a 7 km-long waterfront promenade.

The water temperature in the bay is 20.5°C with the air temperature hovering around 23°C.

Khaleel Al-Jabir, President Qatar Swimming Association and host of the event, said, “This year is an important race as it is good preparation for the FINA World Championships. We are very pleased with the growth in the numbers for this elite race on the Corniche and we are looking forward for the race to start and we wish all the athletes good luck.

This is a good step for us as Qatar will host the FINA World Championships in 2023 so this helps us prepare towards 2023 and work closely with FINA. We have a lot of local Qatar swimmers, although they are still relatively young at 16 and 17 to be competing against world-class athletes such as Sharon Van Rouwendaal and Simone Ruffini, but it is great experience for them and we are expecting a lot for the future
.“

25-year-old defending champion and Olympic gold medalist Sharon van Rouwendaal said, “Conditions are looking really good, I like the water temperature, the course is excellent like last year and it's good to be back in Doha. Last year I won this race and I think that I’m feeling really strong, but the other girls will be strong as well. As it’s a qualifying event for some teams, the teams will be strong. It depends on how I feel on the day what my tactics will be, with large numbers you will have to watch what others do and watch out for any breaks in the pack.”

Simone Ruffini, shown on left, said, “I’m really happy to be here in Doha. I’m feeling strong for this race and as this is a qualifying event for the Italian team for the World Champs, this is very important to me. I’m also happy that there are lots of swimmers in this race."

Competitors:
1 Haley Anderson, USA
2 Angelica Andre, Portugal
3 Kalliopi Araouzou, Greece
4 Samantha Arevalo, Ecuador
5 Leonie Beck, Germany
6 Sarah Bosslet, Germany
7 Lea Boy, Germany
8 Mackenzie Brazier, Australia
9 Arianna Bridi, Italy
10 Rachele Bruni, Italy
11 Katy Campbell, USA
12 Ana Marcela Cunha, Brazil
13 Martina de Memme, Italy
14 Maria de Valdes Alvarez, Spain
15 Alice Dearing, Great Britain
16 Mariah Denigan, USA
17 Fuwei Dong, China
18 Hsin-Yi Fang, Taiwan
19 Alice Franco, Italy
20 Giulia Gabbrielleschi, Italy
21 Carla Goyanes Garcia, Spain
22 Chelsea Gubecka, Australia
23 Chloe Gubecka, Australia
24 Polly Isabella Holden, Great Britain
25 Yawen Hou, China
26 Danielle Huskisson, Great Britain
27 Viviane Jungblut, Brazil
28 Kareena Lee, Australia
29 Becca Mann, USA
30 Angela Maurer, Germany
31 Hannah Moore, USA
32 Yukimi Moriyama, Japan
33 Minami Niikura, Japan
34 Anna Olasz, Hungary
35 Krystyna Panchishko, Ukraine
36 Reka Rohacs, Hungary
37 Paula Ruiz, Spain
38 Onon Katalin Somenek, Hungary
39 Jeannette Spiwoks, Germany
40 Erica Sullivan, USA
41 Aleyna Nur Sungur, Turkey
42 Mira Szimcsak, Hungary
43 Muran Tian, China
44 Chase Travis, USA
45 Ashley Twichell, USA
46 Sharon van Rouwendaal, Netherlands
47 Luca Vas, Hungary
48 Esmee Vermeulen, Netherlands
49 Yi-Chen Wang, Taiwan
50 Jordan White, Australia
51 Finnia Wunram, Germany
52 Xin Xin, China

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Men Will Race And Re-evaluate

Courtesy of FINA, Doha, Qatar.

Olympic 1500m freestyle champion Gregorio Paltrinieri of Italy, world champion Jordan Wilimovsky of the USA and Jack Burnell of Great Britain are among the who's who at the opening stop of the 2019 FINA Marathon Swim World Series that kicks off this Saturday, February 16th in Doha Bay, Qatar.

2016 Olympic 10 km champion Ferry Weertman is one of the very few superstars who are not competing this weekend.

But everyone else who will be fighting for the top 10 Olympic qualification spots at the 2019 FINA World Championships will be there. The podium finishers will be satisfied that their training and preparations are going to plan - and everyone else will re-evaluate their swim and strategies.

The event is live streamed on FINAtv with the women's race at 9:00am (GMT+3) and the men's race at starting at 1:00pm (GMT+3) along Doha’s stunning Corniche, a 7 km-long waterfront promenade.

Olympic contender Simone Ruffini, shown above who finished sixth in the 2016 Olympic 10K Marathon Swim on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, said, “I’m really happy to be here in Doha. I’m feeling strong for this race and as this is a qualifying event for the Italian team for the World Champs, this is very important to me. I’m also happy that there are lots of swimmers in this race."

Competitors:
1 Mahmoud Aldadah, Palestine
2 Jiabao An, China
3 Yosuke Aoki, Japan
4 Miguel Armijos, Ecuador
5 Bailey Armstrong, Australia
6 Galymzhan Balabek, Kazakhstan
7 Andrea Bianchi, Italy
8 David Brandl, Austria
9 Jack Burnell, Great Britain
10 Tiago Campos, Portugal
11 Brendan Casey, USA
12 David Castro, Ecuador
13 Lev Cherepanov, Kazakhstan
14 Igor Chervynskiy, Ukraine
15 Cheng-Chi Cho, Taiwan
16 Victor Colonese, Brazil
17 Matias Cordero, Ecuador
18 Hayden Paul Cotter, Australia
19 Allan do Carmo, Brazil
20 Kai Graeme Edwards, Australia
21 Ivan Enderica Ochoa, Ecuador
22 Esteban Enderica Salgado, Ecuardo
23 Hau-Li Fan, Canada
24 David Farinango, Ecuador
25 Niklas Frach, Germany
26 Matteo Furlan, Italy
27 Peter Galicz, Hungary
28 Pol Gil, Spain
29 Rafael Gil, Portugal
30 Brennan Gravley, USA
31 Eric Hedlin, Canada
32 David Heron, USA
33 Marcus Herwig, Germany
34 Christian Keber, Germany
35 Kenessary Kenenbayev, Kazakhstan
36 Vitaliy Khudyakov, Kazakhstan
37 Kristian Kron, Sweden
38 Riku Kuwazoe, Japan
39 Athanasios Cha Kynigakis, Greece
40 Tzu-Cheng Liao, Taiwan
41 Andrea Manzi, Italy
42 Alberto Martinez Murcia, Spain
43 Gordon John Mason, Great Britain
44 Nicolas Masse-Savard, Canada
45 Jon Thomas McKay, Canada
46 Soeren Meissner, Germany
47 Yohsuke Miyamoto, Japan
48 Abdelrahman Mohamed, Qatar
49 Rob Muffels, Germany
50 Taiki Nonaka, Japan
51 Alessio Occhipinti, Italy
52 Gregorio Paltrinieri, Italy
53 Mark Papp, Hungary
54 Jose Paula Carvalho, Portugal
55 Batuhan Ecrin Pinar, Turkey
56 Fernando Ponte, Brazil
57 Evgenij Pop Acev, Macedonia
58 Guillem Pujol, Spain
59 Zhongyi Qiao, China
60 Kristof Rasovszky, Hungary
61 Christian Riechert, Germany
62 Tobias Patrick Robinson, Great Britain
63 Simone Ruffini, Italy
64 Federic Salghetti-Drioli, Switzerland
65 Ahmad Samara, Qatar
66 Raul Santiago Betancor, Spain
67 Mario Sanzullo, Italy
68 Levente Selmeci, Hungary
69 Iyad Shama, Palestine
70 Nicholas Sloman, Australia
71 Elliot Sodemann, Sweden
72 Daniel Szekelysi, Hungary
73 Takeshi Toyoda, Japan
74 Kai-Wen Tseng, Taiwan
75 Logan Vanhuys, Belgium
76 Dario Verani, Italy
77 Diogo Villarinho, Brazil
78 Ruoyu Wang, China
79 Yunze Wang, China
80 Andreas Waschburger, Germany
81 Florian Wellbrock, Germany
82 Jordan Wilimovsky, USA
83 Bozhao Zhang, China
84 Lijun Zu, China

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
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The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
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2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program