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Sunday, September 25, 2016

Germans Sweep British Open Water Swimming Championships

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The inaugural 2016 Swim Serpentine concluded in style today with an action-packed British Open Water Swimming Championships.

The day got off to a damp start but the sunshine soon emerged, taking the water temperature to over 17°C. The calm and clear conditions provided swimmers with the perfect environment for competition.

It was double victory for Germany in the elite invitation races as first 29-year-old Andreas Waschburger reigned supreme over the three laps of the course, slapping the finish board in a time of 54:52 to take home the £1500 prize money. Pepijn Smits of the Netherlands narrowly pipped Tom Allen of Wales to second place, 13 seconds behind Waschburger.

It proved an enjoyable race for me and it was a special moment to swim here in the Serpentine once again," said Waschburger. "I was here for London 2012, my first Olympics, so it holds fond memories for me. If I can return to this wonderful venue next year, I’ll be here.”

In the women's elite race, Isabelle Härle of Germany came home in 57:41, nearly two minutes ahead of her compatriot Sarah Bosslet in second place. “Most open water races are out in the sea, so the fact that everyone can watch the race here was wonderful,” said 28-year-old Haerle. “If we could swim in more open water races like this, it would be perfect. The venue was great, as was the organisation, so I’d said that it was better than the Rio Olympics.”

Great British Olympic open water swimming star Jack Burnell did not swim, but instead provided the crowds with his expert knowledge, commentating alongside former British Olympian Cassandra Patten.

Burnell said, “The organisation for the event has been second to none, down to the smallest details, which helps to entice top international swimmers such as Waschburger, Haerle and Smits. Having an international field here gave the Brits racing something to strive for. It’s okay swimming against people in your own country but one day you have to go up to the world stage, so to bring athletes like that here is a huge credit to the event.”

The day began with two 1.6 km para elite races. The first race saw 31-year-old Mike Goody, a former Royal Air Force serviceman and an eight-time Invictus Games champion, come home in 20:49, over 1 minute 30 seconds clear of his nearest rival. “When I came down to scope out the course yesterday, I’ll admit that I was a little bit nervous ahead of the race, but today I thoroughly enjoyed it,” said Goody. “I expected an interesting race. Coming past the lido, conditions became quite choppy and a coot nearly hit me on the head, but I found my cadence and just adopted my inner Finding Nemo, with ‘Just Keep Swimming’ in my head.

It’s been a fantastic opportunity to spread the word of open water swimming. If today helps open the door for open water swimming to become a para sport that would be fantastic. Why shouldn’t there be distance events for those with disabilities? It’s so much fun and there are plenty that regularly do it.”

In the women’s para event, Danielle Hartin from Canvey Island, Essex surpassed expectations to win in her very first open water swim. The 14-year-old clocked 24:23 well ahead of second-placed Jordan Margery who finished in 25.44.

Seven other races featured a wide range of age groups, from 13-14 girls and boys races right up to the 40+ classes for men and women with Burnell kept busy presenting the winners with their medals.

Among the standout performances, birthday girl Emily Dowding celebrated her 18th birthday in the 3.2 km 17-18 youths race with victory in 42:38. “I really wanted to secure the win today so it’s great to come out with the victory. The plan was to get off to a good start and remain in front, which I managed to execute. It’s evident from this weekend that momentum is definitely building with open water swimming. I swim a lot in open water, as I love the fact that you can swim outdoors in so many beautiful places, but I’ve never been in the Serpentine previously, so I’m proud to have done so well here, especially today.”

Spectators and swimmers enjoyed the racing and two displays from London-based synchronised swimming team Seymour Synchro. Off the water, there was plenty to do with the fun and games of the paddle boating, water zorbing and virtual reality experiences.

It’s been a fantastic weekend,” said Hugh Brasher, Event Director for London Marathon Events Ltd. “Swim Serpentine has shown the world the very best of open water swimming in the wonderful setting of the Serpentine and I’m sure it’s inspired many of the thousands of spectators to try open water swimming. We are very grateful to The Royal Parks for making this event possible.”

Results in brief:
*Elite Men 5 km winner: Andreas Waschburger (54:52)
*Elite Women 5 km winner: Isabelle Haerle (57:41)
*Para Elite Men 1.6 km winner: Mick Goody (20:49)
*Para Elite Women 1.6 km winner: Danielle Hartin (24:23)
*13-14 Girls 1.6 km winner: Laura Cook (20:24)
*13-14 Boys 1.6 km winner: Oliver Duckworth (20:44)
*15-16 Girls 1.6 km winner: Maisie Macartney (19:56)
*15-16 Boys 1.6 km winner: Billy Hendry (19:52)
*17-18 Youth Men 3.3 km winner: Samuel Crabtree (39:07)
*19-24 Age Group Swimmers Male 3.3 km winner: James Manning (47:44)
*17-18 Youth Women 3.3 km winner: Emily Dowding (42:38)
*19-24 Age Group Swimmers Women 3.3 km winner: Rebecca Gravell (46:09)
*Mixed Age Masters Champs Men 25-29 3.3 km winner: Adam Warner (30:33)
*Mixed Age Masters Champs Women 25-29 3.3 km winner: Hannah Bennett (46:33)
*Mixed Age Masters Champs Men 30-34 3.3 km winner: Aaron Yeoman (42:34)
*Mixed Age Masters Champs Women 30-34 3.3 km winner: Jessica Thorpe (46:32)
*Mixed Age Masters Champs 35-39 Men 3.3 km winner: Pip Bennett (42:30)
*Mixed Age Masters Champs Women 35-39 3.3 km winner: Carol Cashell (46:45)

Full results for all events will be available on the Swim Serpentine.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sir Richard Branson Strives To Swim On

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

British billionaire Richard Branson is back on.

He recovered from a recent head-first, high-speed cycling crash on the British Virgin Islands and is on track to attempt a charity tandem swim together with American actor Adrian Grenier in the 3.2 km Strait of Messina in Italy this coming week.

Coach Bruckner Chase said about Grenier, "He has been traveling a lot, but he is in excellent hands with coordinator Nino Fazio and pilot Giovanni Arena for the Strive Swim. He finished up his preparation with some great group training swims with us in Ocean City, New Jersey.

When he gets in with the right group and next to the boat he will be great, and he is very motivated to make it across
."

While cycling down the hills of Virgin Gorda as part of his training for the upcoming Virgin Strive Challenge, Branson crashed and ended up with a cracked cheek, numerous lacerations and torn ligaments. He said, "I really thought I was going to die. I went flying head-first towards the concrete road, but fortunately my shoulder and cheek took the brunt of the impact, and I was wearing a helmet that saved my life."

And now the adventurer and visionary behind the Virgin brand will carry on with his Virgin Strive Swim.

Branson and Grenier, best known for Entourage and The Devil Wears Prada, will attempt to cross the Strait of Messina from mainland Italy to Sicily which is rare for a single crossing of the Strait of Messina; a vast majority of swimmers swim in the other direction due to the local tidal flows and current directions.

For more information and details of the history of swimming across the Strait of Messina, visit here.

For individual swim crossing records across the Strait of Messina in various strokes, visit here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Three Rivers Marathon Swim Alumni Relay

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The 30 km (18.6-mile) 3RMS (Three Rivers Marathon Swim) Alumni Relay included Anthony McCarley, Kimberly Plewa, Janet Kylander Manning, Melodee Nugent, and Tim Bachman swam in 30-minute legs for a 9 hours 8 minute swim in the three rivers of Pittsburgh. Observer Mike Nugent and kayakers Nikki Navarro and Jan Burton assisted in the 30 km (18.6-mile) swim that encompasses the Ohio, Monongahela and the Allegheny Rivers.

"The 3RMS alumni swam the same format of the race since 2013, but the starting point moved from Heinz Field to the Allegheny Landing dock and finished at its permanent start in front of the fountain at Point State Park. The relay was powered by our escort boat "Catfish Hunter" that avoided a large barge in the Ohio River, a few Just Ducky tour boats in the Monongahela, and the afternoon traffic along Washington's Landing, PNC Park and Heinz Field along the Allegheny River," described race founder and director Darren Miller.

The weather was overcast and in the upper 60's for the first 20 km and the skies opened up the final few hours for a welcomed sun for the final 10 km. A few wind gusts came up to 10-15 mph while the water temperature averaged in the mid-upper 70's. Overall, it was a wonderful day with amazing group of friends. We are planning the kickoff of the September 2017 3RMS event with registration open for all swimmers beginning March 1st 2017."

The Three Rivers Marathon Swim is a charity swim for the Forever Fund. The course includes a 10 km swim each in the Ohio River, Allegheny River, and Monongahela Rivers.

The alumni included:
*Melodee Nugent, 9 hours 15 minutes in 2014
*Anthony McCarley, 11 hours 31 minutes in 2014
*Janet Manning, 12 hours 24 minutes in 2014
*Sarah Thomas / John Humenik, 7 hours 48 minutes in 2015
*Kristin Josephine, 8 hours 25 minutes in 2015
*Chris Greene, 8 hours 35 minutes in 2015
*Kimberly Plewa, 10 hours 16 minutes in 2015

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Catherine Vogt Recognized Again, Again, And Again

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Since 1978 no one has had the influence of open water swimming in the USA Swimming community like USC and Trojan Swim Club coach Catherine Vogt.

A trailblazer, she was awarded her fourth unprecedented Glen S. Hummer Award, a award given to the person or group making the greatest contribution to open water swimming among USA Swimming members.

In 2005, Vogt won as a USA Swimming national team assistant coach at the FINA World Championships in Montreal, Canada.

In 2013, Vogt won unilaterally as the USA Swimming head coach at the FINA World Championships in Barcelona, Spain.

In 2015, Vogt led the USA Swimming open water swimming teamat the 2015 FINA World Championships in Kazen, Russia.

In 2016, Vogt led USA Swimming at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games.

Her fourth career recognition was given to her at today's United States Aquatic Sports Convention in downtown Atlanta and to her swimmer, Haley Anderson from Granite Bay, California and Trojan Swim Club and Jordan Wilimovsky from Malibu, California/Team Santa Monica) were named USA Swimming's Female Open Water Swimmer of the Year and Wilimovsky received the Fran Crippen Male Open Water Swimmer of the Year accolades. Wilimovsky repeated as the USA Swimming Swimmers of the Year while Anderson has won the award five consecutive years.

One of the awards given is the Glen S. Hummer Award that was established in 1978.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

13 Crossings Down, More To Go

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

American Peter Jurzynski is the one of the oldest successful swimmers of the English Channel and a member of the Half Century Club.

He was inducted as an Honour Swimmer in 2005 in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame and has swum the Boston Light Swim numerous times. He made 17 attempts at the English Channel with 13 successes to date with plans to attempt once per year for as long as he is able to make an honest attempt.

He crossed the English Channel three times over the age of 50 including a 17 hour 18 minute crossing in 2004 at the age of 53, a 14 hour 57 minute crossing in 2003 at the age of 52, and a 17 hour 8 minute crossing at the age of 51 in 2002.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Aleksey Akatyev Pulling Double Duty Back In The Day

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Back in the day, Russian open water swimmer/coach Aleksey Akatyev (also spelled as Alexei Akatiev in English) literally did it all.

A member of the Class of 2010 of the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, Akatyev was not only the first Russian to make the transition from a world-class pool swimmer to an elite open water swimmer, but he also served as a athlete-coach at two FINA World Championships.

After competing at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 400m and 1500m freestyle (14th and 8th respectively), he ventured outdoors and established his own lifelong niche in the open water. Within two years of his shift, Akatyev won the 5 km and 25 km races at the 1998 FINA World Swimming Championships (note: the 10 km marathon swim had not yet been added to the FINA schedule).

Akatyev won the 5 km race over a stellar field that included Ky Hurst of Australia, Luca Baldini of Italy, David Meca of Spain, Stéphane Lecat of France and Christof Wandratsch of Germany. After winning the sprint race in the open water, Akatyev then won the 25 km race over another accomplished field that included David Meca and teammate Yuri Kudinov.

Akatyev later established an open water school in Russia with his coach Sergey Kustov and supports the sport by serving in various roles including as a referee.

The crossover athlete always fulfilled a role. After the sudden death of Kustov, his coach of 15 years, Akatyev stepped into the role of coach and led the Russian team at 2000 FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships in Honolulu, Hawaii and the 2001 FINA World Swimming Championships in Fukuoka, Japan. In Honolulu, he not only coached the team (including 5 km gold medalist Yevgeny Bezruchenko and 25 km gold medalist Yuri Kudinov, but he also swam to a bronze medal in the 25 km in just over a minute slower than the swimmer he was coaching.

His overall open water swimming record stands as follows:

FINA World Championships:
1994 25 km bronze
1998 5 km gold
1998 25 km gold
1998 5 km team silver
2000 25 km bronze

LEN European Championships:
1995 5 km gold
1995 25 km gold
1996 5 km gold
1996 25 km gold
1999 5 km silver
1999 25 km gold

FINA World Cup Series:
1999 30 km gold in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia)
2000 25 km gold in Bled (Slovenia)
2000 30 km bronze in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia)

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Lynn Blouin Supporting, Promoting, Giving To The Sport

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Lynn Blouin is a remarkably talented woman who has devoted decades of her time and talents to supporting and promoting the sport of open water swimming.

Blouin was inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame in 2004 as an Honour Administrator for her work of over two decades.

She began as a staff person for the professional 42 km (26-mile) Traversée Internationale du lac Memphrémagog in Québec, Canada and later rose to the position of President and Race Director between 1993 and 1995. She handled various responsibilities in marketing, communications, and culture before presiding over the organisation for 3 years. From 1998 to 2003, she acted as General Manager for the International Marathon Swimming Association and consulted with marathon swims around the globe.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, September 23, 2016

All For One, One For All Round Jersey

Charlie Gravett, Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club.

The British Army won again the Holidays for Hero's relay race around Jersey. The charity swim raises money for Holidays for Heroes Jersey which provides holidays in Jersey for injured service personnel and their families.

"In Jersey, seven teams of six swimmers competed around the 41-mile course," describes Charlie Gravett of the Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club.

"Teams from the actual disabled servicemen and women, The Heroes; the British Army, the Royal Air Force, States of Jersey Airport fire Service, the Jersey Ladies, the Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club and 'Oscars Old and Bold, a team of retired RAF swimmers competed.

Now my feet have once more touched the deck and I've time to take breath, may I say a sincere 'thank you' to everyone for their magnificent response and assistance during the planning and execution of the 'Holidays for Heroes Jersey' relay.


To have seven teams complete the circumnavigation in one go is in itself remarkable, but to have such a close finish, with all teams touching the wall within 46 minutes was really exciting to witness. You swimmers were superb."

Results:
1. The British Army Swimming Union (Kath Baker, Dave Allcock, Louise Darrock, Dave Johnson, Collette Fear, Helena Richardson) 9 hours 20 minutes*
2. The Royal Air Force Association (Ross Wisby, Sophie Trotter, Simon Wooldridge, Clair Weston, Sarah Hashemi) 9 hours 21 minutes
3. Oscars Heavyweight Old and Bold (retired Royal Air Force members Kevin Warren, Dave Cometson, Keith Willox, Roger Gough, Jamie Piercewright) 9 hours 46 minutes
4. The Jersey Ladies (Sarah-Jane Jones, Tracy Appleton, Ali Wood, Jenny Fitzgerald, Leigh Chaytor, Jo Pullman) 9 hours 51 minutes
5. Help for Heroes - Battle Back Swim Team (Nerys Pearce, Mike Stroughan, Peter Stocks, Paul Owen, Edward McMahon) 10 hours 0 minutes
6. Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club Juniors (Charlotte Vernon, Dominic Holley, Alana Powell, Will Waller, Harry Willis, Jordan Sleight) 10 hours 5 minutes
7. Ports of Jersey Swim Team (Matt Journeaux, Clayton Lidster, Micky Willis, Carl Appleton, Jack Le Brun, Chris Queree) 10 hours 6 minutes

* New Holidays for Heroes relay record

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Legion Of Ocean Heroes Does Wonders

Courtesy of Bruckner Chase, Legion of Ocean Heroes, Beesley's Point, New Jersey.

Legion of Ocean Heroes held at Beesley's Point in New Jersey brings together athletes with spinal cord injuries, open water swimmers, youth, service dogs and volunteers with a passion for helping those who cannot otherwise move freely on dryland to enjoy the movement in the open ocean.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

From The Angry Birds To The Smiling Swimmers

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Many creative types flock to Southern California to work in the entertainment industry. Steve Childers is one of those individuals.

But as he works in Hollywood, he also spends his leisure hours in the open water.

Childers's favorite open water swims are in warm tropical water. "The 2.4-mile (3.8 km) Waikiki Roughwater Swim on Oahu is the race that I most look forward to.

I also enjoy the St. Croix Coral Reef Swim [in the Caribbean], but at 5 miles, that is always definitely a challenge. This past may, for the first time I did a 3 km in the beautiful waters between Cancún and Isla Mujeres in Mexico. That one was my first time on the winner's podium...for my age group.

[Closer to home], I look forward to the 3-mile Naples Island Swim and the Dwight Crum Pier-to-Pier Swim, although that one sometimes gives me anxiety due to the chaotic [mass] start and our apparently shark-y Southern California waters
."

Over the past 15 years, he has also competed in other open water races including the La Jolla Roughwater Swim, the Balboa-Newport Pier to Pier swim, and the old Nissan Beach Series. "I do miss the Catalina Coldwater Classic that used to be held towards the end of september - it was always nice to have an excuse to go over to the island for one last summer day," he reminisced.

As he spends his time and talents on dryland in Hollywood, we asked him about his professional responsibilities and interest in open water swimming. His latest project was on the Angry Birds Movie as the Head of Layout for Sony Pictures Imageworks.



Daily News of Open Water Swimming: What does Head of Layout do in an animation film?

Steve Childers: As the Head of Layout at Sony Pictures Imageworks' animated feature "The Angry Birds Movie" - which came out in May 2016 - I led a team of artists that creates a rough version of every shot in a film as a way to figure out the best way to tell the story.

Layout artists work with computer-generated characters and sets to try different 'takes' of moving those characters and different 'camera' compositions, which determines what the audience will see on the screen. Sometimes, our work resembles playing a video game except that these set-ups become the building blocks for the finished film.

If you saw the approved layout, it would look 'similar' to what you see in the theater, but much more crudely done - the eyes may not blink, the mouths don't 'talk' properly, and the characters might slide across the floor instead of walking properly. Since much of the animation process is very time-consuming and labor-intensive, the layout department's goal is to work quickly and loosely, almost like doing rehearsals, and the fine tuning will come later once the director chooses the best 'takes' from the layout.
Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Where is you from and how long have you been swimming?

Steve Childers: I grew up in Hudson, Ohio where I was on the high school swim team for two very unremarkable years. My primary event was the 400-meter freestyle, but you won't find my name in any record books or leaderboards. The high school team was my first real introduction to organized swim workouts, which at least led me to try to keep up with some structure to my swimming. Living in San Diego after college, I joined the University of California San Diego masters swim team and have also worked out with Rose Bowl Aquatics and the Caltech masters swim programs.

Daily News of Open Water Swimming: Where does you swim nowadays and what open water swims have you done?

Steve Childers: These days I swim 3000 meters usually three times a week. My preference is to swim long course, so I choose where to swim based on open 50-meter pools. [In the Los Angeles area,] Burbank and Culver City have great outdoor public pools and the City of Los Angeles has a year-round 50-meter pool in the Boyle Heights neighborhood east of downtown.

Upper photo shows Steve Childers with Alex Kostich who was watching The Angry Birds Movie en route from LAX to Honolulu (lower photo).

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Coach Allen Gilchrest Discusses Stanislas Raczynski

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Emmanuel College coach Allen Gilchrest talks with Shelley Taylor-Smithabout sophomore Stanislas Raczynski of France who won the 2016 CSCAA National Collegiate Open Water Swimming Championship 5 km race in Kansas last week.

The story of Raczynski's victory at the National Collegiate Championships is posted here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Libby Walker Talks About Open Water Swimming

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Libby Walker who tied with her University of Kansas teammate Haley Bishop in winning the National Collegiate Open Water Swimming Championship discusses open water swimming with host Shelley Taylor-Smith.

The story of the dual between Walker and Bishop on Lone Star Lake in Kansas is posted here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Beauty In Barbados

Courtesy of Kristina Evelyn, Barbados Open Water Festival.

Kristina Evelyn is relentlessly passionate about the Barbados Open Water Festival, an open water swimming festival in Carlisle Bay in Barbados with 1.5 km, 5 km and 10 km races.

Evelyn describes the event, "We offer guided 2 km swims in Carlisle Bay followed by a social at the Copa Cabana Beach Bar on November 2nd. Then we have another guided 2 km swim at the Port St. Charles Yacht Club on the Upper West Coast on November 3rd, followed by a social at the Port St. Charles Luxury Yacht Club and a guided 2 km swim at Miami Beach on the South Coast, followed by another social at the famous Oistins Fish Fry on the 4th.

On the 5th, we have two 1.5 km swims: The Swim the Bay and The Just For Fun swim in the morning, and then open water swimming clinics in Carlisle Bay in the afternoon with an all-day beach party with DJ music. Copa Cabana is a great place to chill out, have some food, some drinks and enjoy the day.

On the 6th, we have the 5 km and 10 km Swim the Bay races as well as the 4-person 10 km relay. On the last day, we offer After Party Cruises on the Jolly Roger Party Boat and Cool Runnings Catamaran.

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

British Army Defends Title In Holidays For Heroes

Charlie Gravett, Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club.

The British Army won again the Holidays for Hero's relay race around Jersey. The charity swim raises money for Holidays for Heroes Jersey which provides holidays in Jersey for injured service personnel and their families.

"In Jersey, seven teams of six swimmers competed around the 41-mile course," describes Charlie Gravett of the Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club.

"Teams from the actual disabled servicemen and women, The Heroes; the British Army, the Royal Air Force, States of Jersey Airport fire Service, the Jersey Ladies, the Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club and 'Oscars Old and Bold, a team of retired RAF swimmers competed.

Now my feet have once more touched the deck and I've time to take breath, may I say a sincere 'thank you' to everyone for their magnificent response and assistance during the planning and execution of the 'Holidays for Heroes Jersey' relay.


To have seven teams complete the circumnavigation in one go is in itself remarkable, but to have such a close finish, with all teams touching the wall within 46 minutes was really exciting to witness. You swimmers were superb."

Results:
1. The British Army Swimming Union 9 hours 20 minutes
2. The Royal Air Force 9 hours 21 minutes
3. Oscars Old and Bold (former Royal Air Force) 9 hours 46 minutes
4. Jersey Ladies 9 hours 51 minutes
5. 'Battle Back' Heroes 10 hours 0 minutes
6. Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club Juniors 10 hours 5 minutes
7. Jersey Ports 10 hours 6 minutes

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

2016 ASATT Maracas Open Water Classic On Trinidad

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The ASATT Maracas Open Water Classic is annually held in Maracas Bay on Trinidad's north coast in San Juan-Laventille, Trinidad and Tobago. It is one of the longest running open water swims in the Americas.

While the results of the Top 10 swimmers in each of the longest two events were dominated by teenagers, there was one 50-something, Gerry Rodrigues, who nearly achieved a podium finish.

5 km Top 10 Results:
1. Graham Chattor (16) 1:05:57
2. Christian Marsden (17) 1:06:08
3. William Reyes (15) 1:14:14
4. Gerry Rodrigues (53) 1:14:21
5. Chisara Santana (15) 1:14:49 - first woman
6. Shania David (17) 1:15:01 - second woman
7. Brandon Coombs (15) 1:16:37
8. Sachin Sankar (1) 1:16:37
9. Teresa Otero (17) 1:19:42 - third woman
10. Soroya Simmons (20) 1:22:02 - fourth woman

2.65 km Top 10 Results:
1. Kael Yorke (16) 36:52
2. Josiah Parag (16) 37:49
3. Jada Chattor (14) 38:04
4. Luke Gillette (15) 38:06
5. Gabriel Bynoe (15) 38:10
6. Kegan Ford (17) 38:17
7. Jeron Thompson (16) 38:21
8. Jean-Marc Granderson (15) 38:21
9. Dario Omiss (16) 38:24
10. Daniel Scott (16) 38:28

750m Top 10 Results:
1. Nikoli Blackman (11) 10:34
2. Marquise Nelson (11) 10:52
3. Jonathan Andre (12) 11:04
4. Josiah Changar (11) 11:07
5. Savannah Chee-Wah (10) 11:25
6. Zachary Anthony (9) 11:39
7. Michael McLeod (12) 11:45
8. Johann Matthew Matamoro (11) 11:52
9. Jaidan Harris (12) 12:00
10. Gabrielle Vickles (10) 12:13

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

29th Dakar-Gorée Traverse
















































Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The 29th Traversée Dakar-Gorée is the signature event of the open water swimming season in Sénégal to be held on September 25th. Over 500 Senegalese swimmers, expatriates and foreigners participated in this year' 4.5 km and 5.2 km races at Voile d’Or. The events are organized by the Fédération Sénégalaise de Natation et de Sauvetage (Senegalese Federation of Swimming and Rescue).

"Like a number of other national swimming federations (e.g., La Fédération d’Haïti, l’Association de Natation Haïtienne et de Sauvetage), we find it useful and interesting that these national federations combine their swimming and surf lifesaving missions and organizations. From an open water swimming perspective, it makes perfect sense," said Steven Munatones.

Moustapha Niasse, President of the National Assembly, encourages swimming as a means of drowning prevention. "The authorities must know that swimming is the primary means of prevention against drowning. Worldwide, every 15 minutes someone drowns. These are staggering figures. It is a public health problem."

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Shining Sea, Bright Future In Da Nang

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The 5th Asian Beach Games will be held in Da Nang, Vietnam between September 24th and October 3rd. The Games include 5 km and 10 km races on September 23rd and 25th as well as beach water polo.

The men's 10 km and the female's 5 km will be held on the 23rd; the women's 10 km and the men's 5 km will be held on the 25th.

The Asian Beach Games is a multi-sport event held every two years among athletes representing Indonesia, Thailand, China, South Korea, Oman, India, Japan, Kuwait, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Iraq, United Arab Emirates, Syria, Vietnam, Pakistan, Myanmar, Chinese Taipei, Kazakhstan, Singapore, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Jordan, Philippines, Brunei, Yemen, Bangladesh, Iran, Bahrain, Macau, Maldives, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Tajikistan.

The 5th Asian Beach Games is touted as the biggest ever in terms of the number of sports and participants that will revel in the pristine beaches of Da Nang.

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

With Rome Out, Will It Be Seine Or Santa Monica?

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The 2024 Summer Olympics is turning out to be some race...and very similar to the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim. But several candidate cities expressed interest in hosting the 2024 Olympics. These cities included Rome (Italy), Nairobi (Kenya), Casablanca (Morocco), Durban (South Africa), Johannesburg (South Africa), Doha (Qatar), Brisbane (Australia), Paris (France), Berlin (Germany), Hamburg (Germany), Copenhagen (Denmark), Saint Petersburg (Russia), Kiev (Ukraine), Budapest (Hungary), Istanbul (Turkey), Baku (Azerbaijan), and Los Angeles (USA).

As the bids were announced, city by city fell by the wayside, leaving the lead pack of Rome, Paris, Budapest, and Los Angeles.

Now Rome is pulling out and leaving only Paris, Budapest and Los Angeles as the globe's three possibilities to host the world's Olympic athletes and the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim.

Throughout the history of the Olympic Games, swimming events have been held in the following open bodies of water:

* 1896 Athens Olympics (Games of the I Olympiad): Bay of Zea off the Piraeus coast in the Aegean Sea of Greece
* 1900 Paris Olympics (Games of the III Olympiad): Seine River in Paris, France
* 1904 St. Louis Olympics (Games of the III Olympiad): Man-made pond near Skinker and Wydown Boulevards in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
* 1906 Athens Intercalated Games: Neo Phaliron Bay off the coast of Athens, Greece
* 2008 Beijing Olympics (Games of the XXIX Olympiad): Shunyi Olympic Rowing-Canoeing Park (顺义奥林匹克水上公园 or 順義奧林匹克水上公園 in Chinese), outside Beijing, China
* 2012 London Olympics (Games of the XXX Olympiad): Serpentine in London, UK * 2016 Rio Olympics (Games of the XXXI Olympiad): Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
* 2020 Tokyo Olympics (Games of the XXXII Olympiad): Odaiba Marine Park in Tokyo Bay, Japan

If the city of Paris wins the right to bring back the 2024 Olympic Games, then it will be interesting to see where they will stage the 10 km marathon swim.

One possibility is the urban beach that stretches one mile along the Seine in the heart of Paris, just steps from the Louvre.

During the 1900 Olympic Games, the muddied waters of the Seine hosted the swimming events. With the river current pushing them along, the swimming times were fast. John Arthur Jarvis, a renowned swimmer from Great Britain [shown on left] won the longest events, the 1 km and 4 km river swims.

Frederick Lane of Australia won the 200m freestyle and the 200m obstacle race. Ernst Hoppenberg of Germany won the 200m backstroke and 200m team race.

If Los Angeles wins the 2024 Olympic Games bid, then there are several good possibilities along the Southern California coast:

* Manhattan Beach
* Santa Monica Beach
* Huntington Beach
* Long Beach
* Castaic Lake

Manhattan Beach is where the beach volleyball events will be held and is a wide white sand beach with a long history of holding ocean swims between its piers.

Santa Monica Beach is close to the anticipated Olympic Villages of USC and UCLA with a wide white sand beach and a history of holding ocean events near its massive pier.

Huntington Beach is where the surfing events may be held and is a wide white sand beach with a long history of holding ocean swims and innumerable heavily watched surfing contests near its massive pier.

* Long Beach is where the 1932 Olympics rowing events were held and has a long history of holding triathlons and open water swims.

* Castaic Lake is where USA Swimming has held its open water swimming national championships on several occasions.

Where will the 2024 Summer Olympic Games be held?

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Glen Hummer Leaves Legacy In The Open Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The United States Aquatic Sports Convention is an annual convention for USA Swimming members to gather, discuss issues, elect officers, vote on rules and legislation, discuss and plan programs, and announce awards.

The USAS Convention is being held this week in Atlanta, Georgia.

One of the awards given is the Glen S. Hummer Award that was established in 1978.

The award is named for the renowned Olympian and swimming coach. The Open Water Swimming Committee presents the award annually to the person or group making the greatest contribution to open water swimming among USA Swimming members.

The recipients over the years include the following individuals:

1978 Glen S. Hummer and Cliff Brown
1979 Don Watson and Betty Talbot
1980 La Jolla Town Council and Swim Swim Magazine
1981 Neal & Sue Shepard
1982 Huntington (Indiana) YMCA Booster Club
1983 Buck Dawson
1984 Luke (Mac) Tesky
1985 Penny Lee Dean
1986 Dale Petranech
1987 Keith Barnes
1988 Dottie York
1989 George Haines
1990 Jimi Flowers
1991 Wilton (Connecticut) YMCA Wahoos
1992 Rick Walker
1993 James Whelan
1994 Jennifer Parks and Gail Dummer
1995 International Swimming Hall of Fame
1996 Sid Cassidy
1997 Bob Duenkel
1998 Dianne Limerick
1998 Dave Thomas [shown below]
2000 Brian Schrader

1999 2001 George Bare and Jacqueline Grossman
2002 Denny Ryther
2003 Dr. Dr. Jim Miller
2004 Julie Bare
2005 Open Water Swimming FINA World Championships Team Staff: Rick Walker, Steven Munatones, Denny Ryther, Mike Schrader, Catherine Vogt, Jeremy Vail, Dr. Jim Miller
2006 Greg Cross
2007 Steven Munatones
2008 Bill Rose
2009 Jay Thomas
2010 Shannon Gillespy
2011 Maddy Crippen
2012 Paul Asmuth and Tim Murphy
2013 Catherine Vogt
2014 Gregg Cross
2015 Open Water Swimming FINA World Championships Team Staff: Catherine Vogt, Dave Kelsheimer, Dr. Josh White, Eric Posegay, Laurel Liberty, Bryce Elser

The award will be announced this Friday evening.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Christof Wandratsch Relates To His Coach

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Christof Wandratsch of Germany is the 2015 world 1 km ice swimming champion.

Wandratsch talks with his long-time professional marathon swimming colleague Shelley Taylor-Smith about why a respectful, good relationship with his coach is one key element of his success in The Ice.

Watch Wandratsch in the 1 km ice swimming competition at the Ice Swimming Aqua Sphere German Open on January 7th 2017.

Listen to what his coach has to say here, produced by Red Bull.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program