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Saturday, September 22, 2018

Tiki Swim Is California Cool

<Courtesy of Lexie Kelly, Oceanside, California.

The Tiki Swim is one very cool, hip ocean swim in Southern California.

The Tiki Swim offers two different races. Both the 1.2- and 2.4-mile courses finish at the Oceanside Harbor and are part of the Oceanside Chamber of Commerce Harbor Days Festival.

Race director Brian Long combines all his experiences in the triathlon world and merges them with the ocean swimming community including providing the finishers with a classic TikiSwim8 beach towel, visor, handwoven lei, finisher medal, and a California breakfast burrito.

Top 10 1.2-mile Tiki Swim Results:
1. Ivan Kurakin 26:56
2. Kyle Brill 27:16
3. Jack Spitser 27:33
4. Heidi Reisert 29:28 [first female]
5. Alex Gilchrist 29:53
6. Nic Parrott 29:57
7. Joslyn Rothlein 30:17 [second female]
8. Lindsay Clark 30:23 [third female]
9. Emma Seward 31:01 [fourth female]
10. Ivan Montoya 31:05

Top 10 2.4-mile Tiki Swim Results:
1. David Steele 1:00:33
2. Jeff Walker 1:04:05
3. Jim Dauw 1:04:22
4. Geoff Hammond 1:04:42
5. Hubie Kerns 1:05:28
6. Gustavo Menezes 1:06:02
7. James Brady 1:07:34
8. David Kelsch 1:08:50
9. Paull Connolly 1:09:03
10. Paul Clark 1:09:05
11. Julie Moss 1:09:50 [first female]
15. Cecelia Dotzler 1:11:43 [second female]

Photo above shows three Newport Harbor High School swimmer Justin Boals, Nick Baljeu and Adam Faludi.

For more information, visit www.tikiswim.com/.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Walter Poenisch Showcased On Travel Channel

Courtesy of Travel Channel, Strait of Florida, Cuba - Florida.

Titanic Baker, Psychic Scammer and Cuban Swimmer Crisis, a program about on Travel Channel’s Mysteries at the Museum program premiered on September 19th.

Mysteries at the Museum is a program hosted by Don Wildman that delves into the world’s greatest institutions to unearth extraordinary relics that reveal incredible secrets from the past. Through compelling interviews, rare archival footage and arresting recreations, Mysteries at the Museum illuminates the hidden treasures at the heart of history’s most incredible triumphs, sensational crimes and bizarre encounters.

Titanic Baker, Psychic Scammer and Cuban Swimmer Crisis showcased the tale of a brave baker, revealed the secret behind a sinister psychic, and investigates the background of Walter Poenisch.

Poenisch (1913 - 2000) was a former American fin swimmer who completed open water swims in Michigan, Ohio, Florida, and in the Atlantic Ocean where he set three records. He was called the World's Strongest Endurance Swimmer as he towed a 30-ton paddlewheel boat while swimming with his hands and feet shackled.

He completed a swim from Cuba to The Little Duck Key in Florida at the age of 68 in 1978. His solo swim covered 207 km in 34 hours 15 minutes. He was escorted by Captain Bendt Lynge, observer and authenticator J. Marvin Mims, President of the International Federation of Professional Ocean Swimmers and Divers, Glenn Drummond, escort boat owner, and his wife Fayette Poenisch. He is only open water swimmer who is a member of the International Swimming Hall of Fame, but not the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, September 21, 2018

Don't Get In If They Can't Get You Out

Courtesy of WOWSA, Dingle, Co Kerry, Ireland.

Nuala Moore received the Admiral Frank Golden Scholarship from The Lifesaving Foundation, an international charity devoted to saving lives from drowning. The Foundation supports a number of partner projects and hosts regular drowning prevention conferences.

Moore was invited to speak on Rescue Emergency Care for channel swimmers and their escort pilots on October 20th - 21st.

During the presentation, the attendees received a copy of Moore's Insight Into The World Of Ice Swimming, a manual based on Moore's experiences doing ice swimming from Ireland to Russia and Argentina.

The manual focuses on Cold Water Shock, Cold Water Incapacitation/Swim Failure, Post-Rescue Collapse and Hypothermia and how it applies to ice swimmers.

Moore was humbled, "It was fantastic to see the minds turning on the areas I have been focusing on. I put the work into the manual for safety and educational reasons as the sport of ice swimming grows with events - it is great to see that this prestigious group of people picked it up and recognized."

Her presentation was titled 'Why Understanding the Challenge is as Important as Training for the Distance' that covered areas including channel swimming and ice swimming with the focus on increasing the awareness of escort teams for both rescue and support. Moore explained, "Risk assessment is an area and rescue readiness is an area that all swimmers need to be up-to-date on and my greatest lesson learned is that 'If the team can't get you out of the water, you don't get in.'

The greatest challenge is that many swims are remote and require the team to understand the challenges of the swim and to have the ability to recognize areas of swim failure.

In my area of cold water research and its applications and safe outcomes, I have been working with the World Extreme Medicine and Dr. Patrick Buck. I have learned so much, not only about the relevant information, but about the application to the swimmer. As cold takes hold, the challenge for the swimmer is to continue to function and still have the ability to recover.

What we have certainty about is that immersion in cold water changes the physiological workings of the body and our time in the water is finite, during this time depending on the swimmer and the temperature we have so much to monitor. I have loved my journey and now I am turning to safety and recovery from unintended outcomes of our swims.
"

As the sport grows and more people come into the challenges, the risks increase. "One of my main focuses is not only educating the swimmer, but also informing the teams of the potential roles they have; ones they may not have thought about and mostly ensure that we continue to push boundaries, but in a way that safety is not compromised in lieu of achievement.

Living on the edge requires a skill set and that is part and parcel of planning.

Cold water requires the team to be not only the support, but potentially to terminate a swim and adapt to being the rescue team. Being recognised by The Lifesaving Foundation is beyond exciting from the access I am given to those at the forefront of research and rescue
."

Photo above shows Moore with John Long, CEO of the Commonwealth Drowning Prevention and the Royal Lifesaving Society.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Pat Marzulli Becomes Oldest Swimmer Across Catalina

Courtesy of Jason Malick, Catalina Channel, California.

Pat Marzulli just completed a crossing of the Catalina Channel in 15 hours 29 minutes today. With his success, he became the oldest person to complete a crossing of the Catalina Channel at 69 years 311 days old.

He broke the records previously held by Jim McConica (64 years in 10 hours 48 minutes in 2015) and Carol Schumacher Hayden (66 years 58 days in 15 hours 2 minutes in 2016).

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

These People Will Entertain, Inspire You With Their Answers

Photos courtesy of Kelvin Trautman in English Channel, UK.

Why?

Open water swimmers do channel swims, marathon swims, ice swims, ocean swims, stage swims, wild swims, and extreme aquatic adventures of all kinds and in all places.

For non-swimmers, pool swimmers and mostly everyone who exercises on dryland, open water swimmers are often asked why? "Why do you push yourself in such cold conditions, for so long, with so many sharks and jellyfish, at night against such waves and turbulence?"

Their answers are sometimes difficult to fathom.

But the speakers and presenters at the 2018 WOWSA Talks & WOWSA Awards on November 9th - 10th at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, California can eloquently answer the question why. They are articulate, engaging and entertaining as they explain their motivations.

To meet and listen to the following speakers, presenters and honorees at The Olympic Club, register here.

Lewis Pugh - UK
Swimming for Change
Lewis is a former maritime lawyer from the UK, one of the world’s leading ocean advocates from his home base in Cape Town, and an open water swimmer with a long list of unprecedented pioneering swims around the world. He delivers his message of ocean conservation to influential heads of states, top government officials, and millions of citizens around the world. In some cases, his pioneering swims have ultimately led to the creation of marine sanctuaries and Marine Protected Areas and justified his designation as the United Nations Patron of the Oceans. He received the Presidential Award from the International Swimming Hall of Fame and is an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame. He is an unparalleled environmental campaigner via Speedo Diplomacy with a list of swims accomplished in the North Pole, Mount Everest, Antarctica, Maldives, and Scandinavia. He has been named a Young Global Leader, Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Fellow of The Explorers Club, and Adventurer of the Year, and received the Order of Ikhamanga (Gold Class) in South Africa. He is a wildly popular speaker and author of Achieving the Impossible and 21 Yaks and a Speedo.

Shelley Taylor-Smith - Australia
Shattering the Gender Pay Gap In Open Water Swimming
Shelley is a professional marathon swimmer, coach, author, administrator, Olympic referee and motivational speaker based in Western Australia. She was the dominant marathon swimmer in the 1980’s and 1990’s when she was crowned the World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation champion seven times and won the Manhattan Island Marathon Swim five times. She served for over 20 years on various FINA committees and helped administer the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and 2012 London Olympics. She is one of the few dual inductees as she was selected as an Honor Swimmers in both the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 1989) and International Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2008). She has been honored multiple times in Australia as the Australian Female Athlete of the Year, Australian Sports Medal recipient, two-time Australian of the Year finalist, and received the Irving Davids - Captain Roger Wheeler Memorial Award from the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

Aaron Peirsol - USA
Getting Wet
Aaron is a former competitive swimmer and current world record holder in the 200m backstroke. He is a 3-time Olympian and 7-time Olympic medalist (five gold medals + two silver medals). He has won 36 medals in major international competitions: 29 golds + 6 silvers + 1 bronze) spanning the Olympics and the World, Pan American and Pan Pacific Championships. Growing up a Junior Guard in Newport Beach, in his retirement, Aaron has revisited his love for the ocean, becoming an ambassador for marine conservation non-profit Oceana and competing in ocean swims from Newport Beach to Rio de Janeiro. Aaron is also an avid body surfer and paddler, and is currently developing a beach safety program in Costa Rica.

Kimberley Chambers - New Zealand
Making A Comeback, Step By Step
Kimberley from New Zealand has fought back from near-death experiences to become one of the world’s most accomplished marathon swimmers. The former ballerina now living in San Francisco shifted to swimming after rehabilitating from nearly having her leg amputated. She went on to achieve the Oceans Seven and was the first woman to complete a crossing to the Farallones Island in the world’s most densely populated area with Great White Sharks. She serves as a motivational speaker with popular stints at TED Conferences and at the United Nations. In addition to her corporate work at Adobe in Silicon Valley, she has focused the energy at raising millions of dollars for charitable causes together with the Night Train Swimmers. She has completed unprecedented relay, tandem crossings, and cross-border swims from Mexico to Israel, in lakes and down the California coast, and was selected as one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Women. A film on her life and comeback, KIM SWIMS, has been extremely well-received in dozens of film festivals across the United States.

Ben Lecomte - France
Transoceanic Swimming - From Tokyo to San Francisco [via video from Pacific Ocean]
Ben lives a life marrying adventure and risk with his love of swimming and focusing on a message of protecting the world’s oceans. The Frenchman is a transoceanic stage swimmer who completed a 5,980 km swim across the Atlantic Ocean in 73 days in 1998. Twenty years later, he is attempting a similar 8,721 km stage swim across the Pacific Ocean between Japan and California. Currently en route somewhere far from both the Japanese and American shores, he is conducting myriad scientific and research projects from his escort boat with a dedicated crew of researchers. They collect human physiological data as well as measure and observe waste plastic in the oceans far from shore.

Angel More - USA
Inspiring The Next Generation
Angel is a young, emerging endurance athlete from San Francisco. She is a marathon swimmer, triathlete, extreme athlete and Century cyclist who has raised $40,000 to date for the charitable organization Children International. She has completed a total of 51 Alcatraz Island crossings and participated in open water swims from South Africa to Sweden and England. She is the youngest person to complete the 10 km Bridge to Bridge Swim, 20 km Capitola Santa Cruz Pier-to-Pier Swim, 19.6 km Santa Barbara Channel, 34.2 km Lake Tahoe crossing, and the 12-mile Wharf to Wharf to Wharf Swim throughout her native California.

Ger Kennedy - Ireland
Flight Or Fight In The Ice
Ger is an extreme athlete, renowned ice swimmer, race director, coach and mentor from Ireland. In addition to organizing triathlon events and open water swimming races and expeditions from Dublin to Siberia to Antarctica, he came up with the concept of Ice Sevens and has compete in the International Ice Swimming Championships and International Winter Swimming Championships and World Cups in various countries. In addition to coaching and mentoring ice swimmers at all speeds, experiences and walks of life, he has completed 10 official Ice Miles, 3 unofficial Ice Miles, a 2 km Extreme Ice Mile in 0.5°C water, a Polar Ice Mile, two Ice Zero Miles, and swum 52 meters under the ice in -1ºC (30.2ºF) in northern Russia and is organizing the Antarctica 2020 International Swim. He is one of the few humans defined as an Ice Ironman, an individual who has completed a full Ironman triathlon and an Ice Mile.

Antonio Argüelles - Mexico
2015 and 2017 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year
Antonio is one of the leading channel and marathon swimmers in the world from his home base of Mexico City. In addition to completing a number of triathlons and marathon runs, he has completed the Oceans Seven at the age of 58 - the oldest to do so - and has twice achieved the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming. He is an author, aquapreneur, and was named one of the Greatest Watermen in Open Water Swimming History and one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Men. His prolific career has led him to be voted as the 2015 and 2017 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year and inducted as an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2014). He is an inspiring figure in his native Mexico where he has frequently appeared on television and in numerous publications.

Jaimie Monahan - USA
2016 and 2017 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year
Jaimie is as versatile as an open water swimmer came be. Based in New York, there is no one who flies more often or further than Jaimie to do channel swims, marathon swims, lake swims, night swims, ice swims, and compete in the International Ice Swimming Championships, International Winter Swimming Championships and World Cup circuit. She was inducted as an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2018) and was voted as the 2016 and 2017 World Open Water Swimming Woman of the Year, and received the Barra Award for Best Overall Year and the Yudovin Award for Most Adventurous Swim by the Marathon Swimmers Federation. She is one of the few Ice Ironwomen who have completed both a full Ironman triathlon and Ice Mile. She was the first human in history to complete the Ice Sevens, is an Ice Zero Swimmer, has completed the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming, is a 3-time member of the 24-Hour Club, serves as President of the Lake Geneva Swim Association, and won the inaugural 40 Bridges Double Manhattan Island Swim.

Margarita Llorens Bagur - Spain
2017 World Open Water Swimming Performance of the Year
Margarita never quits trying or helping others achieved their own goals. She serves as president of the Menorca Channel Swimming Association and is a member of the 24-Hour Club. Her 37-hour 73 km channel swim attempt, albeit unsuccessful, was so remarkable and inspiring that it was voted as the 2017 World Open Water Swimming Performance of the Year. In addition to her record-setting swims in the Menorca Channel environs, she has completed a number of marathon swims throughout Europe, from Spain to Greece.

Adrian Sarchet - Guernsey
Sea Donkeys - 2017 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year
Adrian is an advocate from Guernsey who has completed 1 km winter swims and 6 of 7 channels in the Oceans Seven in order to raise money for cancer research. He has completed crossings of the English Channel, Catalina Channel, Strait of Gibraltar, North Channel, Molokai Channel, and Tsugaru Channel in addition to Round Jersey and Round Guernsey solo circumnavigation swims. His North Channel training and success was the subject of the 90-minute documentary film Sea Donkey, the 2017 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year, produced James Harrison.

Marcia Benjamin - USA
Training A Marathon Swimmer In Your Masters Swimming Program
Marcia is a renowned coach and mentor of swimmers and triathletes at every level and age based in Oakland, California. She has received numerous awards (2013 Kerry O’Brien Coaches Award, 2006 Dorothy Donnelly Service Award, and 2000 and 2017 Peggy Lucchesi Awards) and represented Team USA at the 2013 Maccabiah Games. An accomplished masters swimmer in her own right, she runs what is deservedly described the most diverse group of swimmers on the planet at Oakland’s MEMO (Marcia's Enthusiastic Masters of Oakland).

Antonio Argüelles - Mexico
Why Swimming is My Rock
Antonio is one of the leading channel and marathon swimmers in the world from his home base of Mexico City. In addition to completing a number of triathlons and marathon runs, he has completed the Oceans Seven at the age of 58 - the oldest to do so - and has twice achieved the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming. He is an author, aquapreneur, and was named one of the Greatest Watermen in Open Water Swimming History and one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Men. His prolific career has led him to be voted as the 2015 and 2017 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year and inducted as an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2014). He is an inspiring figure in his native Mexico where he has frequently appeared on television and in numerous publications.

Megan Melgaard - USA
Swimming For Good, Swim Across America
Megan is considered to have one of the smoothest and efficient freestylers on the planet. She is an accomplished pool and open water swimmer, administrator, race director and aquapreneur based in Santa Monica, California. She has appeared in Hollywood movies both behind and in front of the camera, led water safety programs for Delta Airlines flight attendants, raced as a professional Ironman triathlete, cycled across America, and was a member of the USA Swimming national team, been a masters swimming world champion, is an Honorary Coast Guard Rescue Swimmer, and has coached swimmers and non-swimmers of all ages and abilities. She currently serves as the Director of Events and Safety for Swim Across America, the world’s most successful swimming charity organization.

Ross Edgley - UK
The Great British Swim
Ross is the British creator of Strongman Swimming who is a thoroughly educational and entertaining personality on social media and writings in GQ Magazine, Men’s Health, Telegraph, Askmen.com and Men’s Fitness. The former water polo player, he is considered one of the leading British fitness industry experts and co-founder of The Protein Works. He is currently engaging people from all walks of life through The Great British Swim, a 3,218 stage swim around the entirety of Great Britain.

Sally Minty-Gravett - Jersey
Rising To The Occasion
Sally Minty-Gravett, MBE from Jersey has earned a unique legacy for having completed an English Channel crossing once every decade for the past five consecutive decades (at 18 years in 1975, 28 years in 1985, 35 years in 1992, 48 years in 2005, and 56 years in 2013. She culminated her English Channel career with an epic 36 hour 26 minute 67.6 km two-way crossing between England and France at the age of 59 in 2016 for which she received the Churchill Award for Courage and was appointed as a Member of the British Empire. She coached swimmers of all ages and abilities for four decades and served as president of the Jersey Long Distance Swimming Club for 27 years. She was selected as one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Women and is an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, Class of 2005.

Pat Gallant-Charette - USA
Never Too Old
Pat is an unlikely accomplished marathon swimmer. After decades of working as a full-time nurse in her native state of Maine, she started to turn to channel swimming and has rewritten the record books in the Tsugaru Channel, North Channel, Molokai Channel, Lake Ontario, Lake Tahoe, Loch Ness, Catalina Channel and Windermere as the oldest female to cross these iconic bodies of water. Her successes do not come easy as her first attempts at these marathon swims are not always successful. Her DNF’s and successes in the English Channel have led to being awarded with the Rosemary George Award for the Most Meritorious Swim of the Year, the O’Clee Jubilee Award, and the Mercedes Gleitze Trophy by the Channel Swimming Association. To date, the 67-year-old has completed 6 of 7 channels in the Oceans Seven and 4 of 8 lakes in the Still Water Eight. She was named one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Women and one of 101 Movers and Shakers in the Open Water World as well as founded the Valentine’s Day Swim for your Heart charity event.

Evan Morrison - USA
LongSwims Database Insights and Data Analyses
Evan is a marathon swimmer, administrator, and technology developer based in San Francisco. As co-founder of the Marathon Swimmers Federation, he has created innovations such as the LongSwimsDB historical results databased, the TRACK.RS live GPS tracking system, the MSF Rules of Marathon Swimming, the Marathon Swimmers Forum, and the MSF Documented Swims platform for authenticating independent marathon swims. Evan also serves as president of the Santa Barbara Channel Swimming Association, and as a selector for the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame. His record-setting swim across the Santa Barbara Channel from Santa Cruz Island was featured in the documentary film DRIVEN.

Nejib Belhedi - Tunisia
76 Hours of Solo Swimming
Nejib is an open water swimming icon in his native Tunisia where he completed a 120 km non-stop 76 hour 30 minutes swim from the Southern Salin Basin in Thyna-Sfax across the Gulf of Gabes and Boughrara Lake to Jlij Island just near Scorpion Tower, crossed the English Channel, completed a 1400 km stage swim along the entire coast of Tunisia, completed ice swims in 1°C water in Barbara Lake and 2°5C water in Oued Mallegue Lake, and completed a series of unprecedented boat-pulls up to a 1014 ton boat. His accomplishments have been voted as the 2011 World Open Water Swimming Performance of the Year and as the 2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year.

Ned Denison - USA
International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame [via Skype]
Ned is a marathon swimmer, channel swimmer, ice swimmer, administrator, and open water swimming clinician and mentor based in Cork, Ireland. In addition to founding and managing the Cork Distance Week that draws swimmers from around the world, he came up with such innovations as the Triple Crown of Prison Island Swims and the Body Brain Confusion Swim. He serves as the Chairman of the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame and host of the annual induction ceremonies. He was named one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Men and was inducted as an Honor Contributor in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2012), the Vermont Open Water Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2017), and the Ireland Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2017) with 47 marathon swims completed. He is a board member of the International Ice Swimming Association and received the Poseidon Award and the Irving Davids-Captain Roger Wheeler Memorial Award from the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

Dan Simonelli - USA
Planning and Logistics of a Channel Swim
Dan from San Diego, California is arguably the most active marathon swimming crew member and escort kayaker with nearly 150 channel crossings in the last two years. He founded the Open Water Swim Academy and serves as race directors to coastal and channel swims. In addition to serving as an open water swimming coach, he is a selector for the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame and received the Streeter Award for Service to Marathon Swimming and the Barra Award for the Best Overall Year from the Marathon Swimmers Federation. He has completed two Oceans Seven channels, including a Catalina Channel crossing in January, and is a member of the La Jolla Cove Swim Club where he mentors many young and older channel swimmers.

Annette Kellerman - Australia
International Swimming Hall of Fame Exhibition
Annette began her aquatic career in Australia as a world record holder in the mile, but she left her influential footprint across Europe, the Americas and Oceania and South Africa. She attempted three crossings of the English Channel and then because a successful entrepreneur and a popular Hollywood silent film actress. She did numerous open water expeditions and unprecedented swims around the world, created her own swimsuit line, and pushed for swimming lessons for women and girls. Her remarkable life was depicted in the Hollywood movie, Million Dollar Mermaid, starring Esther Williams. She is an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 1965) and in the International Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 1974). She was called the Perfect Woman because of the similarity of her physical attributes to Venus de Milo.

Bryce Elser - USA
Athlete Progression to Podium Success
Bryce from Colorado Springs has led the USA national open water swim team to become the best national team on the planet with several world champions and an Olympic silver medalist. The former captain of the USC swim team, a perennial powerhouse in collegiate swimming, he is also an ocean lifeguard and received the Glen S. Hummer Award from USA Swimming for managing the 2015 FINA World Championship team.

Ram Barkai - South Africa
The Future of Ice Swimming [via video]
Ram is a visionary and administrator from Cape Town. His greatest legacy include founding and managing the International Ice Swimming Association, establishing the standards, rules and ratification system for Ice Miles and Ice Kilometers, organizing the International Ice Swimming World Championships. He has completed marathon swims and ice swims from South Africa and the Sea of Galilee to Alaska and Alcatraz. He has completed 11 Ice Miles, set a Guinness World Record ice swim in Antarctica, organized and completed the Patagonia Extreme Cold Water Challenge, appeared in the Superhuman Showdown TV series, and served as a race director for a popular ocean series in South Africa. He was selected as one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Men and is lobbying for the inclusion of the Ice Kilometer into the Winter Olympic Games.

Cameron Bellamy - South Africa
Achieving The Oceans Seven [via video from Barbados]
Cameron is a South African adventurer and entrepreneur currently living in San Francisco. He has created Ubunye Challenge, a successful charitable organization, and became the first African Oceans Seven swimmer at the age of 36. In addition to his channel swims, he has rowed across the Indian Ocean, cycled across China and India and Colombia, cycled across the UK from its southernmost tip to its northernmost tip, and attempted a 96 km circumnavigation swim around Barbados in which he swam for over 27 hours and 66 kilometers.

Brent Rutemiller - USA
Special Exhibit on Annette Kellerman
Brent started a career as a successful swim coach and has branched out to become one of the most influential power brokers in the aquatics community. After leading Sports Publications Inc. that publishes Swimming World Magazine for 33 years, he acquired the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2017. While serving as the dual CEO of the International Swimming Hall of Fame and Swimming World Magazine, he is in a unique position to tie the past with contemporary times and swimming’s future. In addition to publishing SWIM Magazine, Swimming Technique, Water Polo Scoreboard, and The AquaZoids, and producing The Morning Show, he is also author of Below the Surface, a look at the administrative side of competitive swimming.

Jessi Harewicz - Canada
Circumnavigation Swims
Jessi is an emerging marathon and channel swimmer from western Canada who has completed cold-water circumnavigation marathon swims around Mercer Island in the state of Washington and Bowen Island in British Columbia, including a 33 km circumnavigation in 21 hours in 12°C water. She has also completed swims across the English Channel and Catalina Channel in California and the Georgia Strait in British Columbia and was selected as one of the World’s 50 Most Adventurous Open Water Woman.

David Holscher - USA
Night Train Swimmers
David is one of the first members of Night Train Swimmers who crossed the English Channel and participated in a Farallon Islands relay. He has done short (1.6 km RCP Tiburon Mile), medium (15 km Strait of Bonifacio), long (32.3 km Catalina Channel) and longer (San Francisco to Santa Barbara Relay and 367 km California Coastal Relay) swims.

Jamie Patrick - USA
2011 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year
Jamie swims, escorts, crews, and organizes. He completed a 31-hour Swimming California charity swim down the Sacramento River, created the Adventure Swim Contest, crossed the Strait of Gibraltar, hosted Jamie's Swim Camp, Jamie’s Swim Camp III, The Lake Tahoe Edition and Swim Camp Catalina. He founded the Lake Tahoe Swimming Society, appeared on a Universal/NBC television special, and crewed for Sarah Thomas' 168.3 km 67 hour 16 minute Century Swim in Lake Champlain.

Steven Munatones - USA
Tactics and Strategies Used at the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim
Steven was a competitive swimmer and water polo player who won the World Long Distance Swimming Championship and pioneered 5 swims in Japan. He served as a 9-time USA Swimming national team coach and created brands and terms in the open water swimming world from Oceans Seven to the Daily News of Open Water Swimming. He is an Honor Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame (Class of 2002) and received the Poseidon Award and the Irving Davids-Captain Roger Wheeler Memorial Award from the International Swimming Hall of Fame. He helped establish open water swimming for intellectually disabled swimmer and was the Technical Delegate at the Special Olympic World Summer Games. He is an author, national championship race director and FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee member and continues to give speeches on the sport.

"Listening and learning from all these luminaries will be a true honor and joy," says Quinn Fitzgerald, the Swim Commissioner of The Olympic Club.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Edilson Bento Pays A Tribute To His Father

Courtesy of Adherbal de Oliveira, Travessia do Leme ao Pontal, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

On September 20th, Edilson Heleno Holz Bento became the latest swimmer to complete the 36 km Travessia do Leme ao Pontal in Rio de Janeiro with the longest time in the history of the Leme to Pontal Swimming Association.

Edilson Bento, a native of southern Brazil, learned to swim five years ago and was motivated by his dream to become a military police lifeguard. Bento began participating in open water swims and marathons.

At the beginning of his window, the sea around Rio de Janeiro did not offer the minimum safety conditions for attempting the crossing, but Bento waited patiently and anxiously for three days. Finally, at midnight on the 20th, he was given a go.

His mother, Ivanilda Bento, was on his escort boat Rio Boa Sorte and saw him tackle the night hours, strong currents, cross winds and turbulent sea, finally finishing on Pontal Beach after a long 15 hours 50 minutes. Bento surprised everyone on shore when he took a picture of his late father out from inside his neoprene suit.

Bento decided to swim with the photo to pay homage to his father who had the dream of knowing the city of Rio de Janeiro.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Spotlight On Sharon van Rouwendaal, Ferry Weertman



Courtesy of Colin Hill, Qiandao Lake, Chun'an, China.

Colin Hill of Chillswimasked 2016 Olympic 10 km marathon swimming champions Sharon van Rouwendaal and Ferry Weertman about their training and technique when they all gathered in in Qiandao Lake, Chun'an at the most recent FINA/HOSA Marathon Swim World Series event in China.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

What A Race It Will Be - Rio Negro Champions Challenge

Courtesy of Pierre Gadelha, Manaus, Brazil.

Pierre Gadelha is very active on the Brazilian open water swimming scene.

He served as the escort pilot for Jaraqui Elétrico, a 6-person relay that completed the 36 km Travessia do Leme ao Pontal in Rio de Janeiro.

He also serves as the race director of the Rio Negro Challenge Amazonia in Manaus, partly along the Rio Negro Bridge. Manaus is the capital city of the state of Amazonas in northern Brazil.



The Rio Negro Challenge Amazonia includes the 500m Circuito Curumim, the 1.5 km and 3 km Maratona Aquática Amazonas, and the 8.5 km Travessia Almirante Tamandaré.



The second event last year included the 90 km Solidário where two athletes from Manaus - Vitor Gadelha swam 30 km and André Costa ran 60 km - inspired people to collect food for charity institutions and got 3 tons of food donated.

"But this year, we will have an even bigger challenge called the Rio Negro Champions Challenge," explains Gadelha. "It will be a race between the multiple FINA world champion Ana Marcela Cunha and the 2016 Olympic 10 km champion Sharon van Rouwendaal."



For more information on the December 9th event, visit the Facebook page or register at www.rionegrochallenge.com.br.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Navigating In Noli

Courtesy of Oscar Rubio, Noli, Italy.

Last weekend, Noli was the site of last stage on the Open Water World Tour.

Over 500 swimmers from all other Europea gathered in Noli, Italy for the final race of the Italian Open Water Tour Challenge 2018.

It was a colorful event. A rainbow effect was enabled by the multi-colored buoys on the 5 km Hard Swim course that was won by Giacomo Simeoni and Jane Hoag, the European pool record holder on 400 meters and 800 meters. The pair dominated the race from the start to finish line.

The final event of the Open Water World Tour will be on October 5th - 7th in Greece at the Spetses mini Marathon.

For more information, visit www.openwaterworldtour.com. The full rankings are posted here.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swim Head Up

Courtesy of WOWSA, Odaiba Marine Park, Tokyo, Japan.

The Japan Times wrote an interesting local perspective of what the Olympic 10 km marathon swim finalists may face in Odaiba Marine Park at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics: see here.

Currently, swimmers who wish to swim in Odaiba Marine Park are asked to sign a waiver listing 23 rules to observe, including Rule No. 9: "When the yellow flag is out in the venue, please refrain from swimming with your face inside the water."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Nejib Belhedi, The Man With A Big Heart

Courtesy of WOWSA, Sfax, Tunisia.

Nejib Ben Messaoud Belhedi is known for his channel swims, ice swims, and stage swims along the entire coast of Tunisia - and for introducing the concept of Ouma in his native land.

But at 8:20 am on September 15th, Belhedi took off on his longest swim of his career - a 120 km solo swim from the Southern Salin Basin in Thyna-Sfax through the middle of Boughrara Lake in Tunisia.

76 hours 30 minutes later at 12:50 pm on September 18th, he landed on Scorpion Tour Island in Djerba. He was able to give interviews, but was taken to a medical clinic to recover and get a checkup.

While Belhedi swam non-stop from Saturday morning to Tuesday afternoon to join the 24-Hour Club.

"But what is most remarkable about Nejib is that this 66-year-old previously underwent open heart surgery and had a heart bypass performed on him in 2005 at the Military Hospital in Tunisia. Over the last few years, he has done a number of significant open water swims and was awarded the 2016 Heart Trophy by the Société Tunisienne de Cardiologie et de Chirurgie Cardiovasculaire," observed Steven Munatones.

"But for this swim, the longest and toughest of his career, he had to prepare his surgically-repaired 66-year-old body. He lost weight, he improved his diet, and he improved his swimming technique. He really stepped up his game in order to succeed in this 120 km swim - a swim nearly four times as long as his 1993 English Channel swim which he did in 16 hours 35 minutes under Force 4 conditions when he was only 41 years old. To the best of my knowledge, there are not many swimmers - probably very, very few - in the 24-Hour Club who have previously undergone heart bypass surgery and made such a comeback."

Belhedi will be honored at the 2018 WOWSA Talks & WOWSA Awards on November 10th at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, California. To meet the 2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year who also completed the 2011 World Open Water Swimming Performance of the Year for his 1400 km stage swim in Tunisia, register here.

Members of the 24-Hour Club compiled by the World Open Water Swimming Association include the following swimmers. They are listed by length of time in the water.

24-Hour Club Members:
1. Charles Zibelman (USA) 233 km downstream in the Hudson River from Albany to Manhattan Island(USA) in 1937 in 148 hours
2. John Sigmund (USA) 470 km down the Mississippi River (Missouri, USA) in 1940 in 89 hours 46 minutes
3. Pedro A Candiotti (Argentina) 452 km downstream in Rio de la Plata (Argentina) in 1935 in 84 hours 0 minutes
4. María Digna Ezcurra de Ortellado 318 km downstream from Concepción to Puerto Pilcomayo in Paraguay River in Argentina in 1957 in 80 hours 45 minutes
5. Nejib Belhedi (Tunisia) 120 km across the Boughrara Lake from Sfax to Djerba in Tunisia in 2018 in 76 hours 30 minutes
6. Pedro A Candiotti (Argentina) 330 km downstream in Rio de la Plata (Argentina) in 1943 in 74 hours 30 minutes
7. Pedro A Candiotti (Argentina) 339 km downstream in Rio de la Plata (Argentina) in 1931 in 71 hours 55 minutes
8. Sarah Thomas (USA) 168.3 km in an island loop route on Lake Champlain, New York (USA) in 2017 in 67 hours 16 minutes
9. Pedro A Candiotti (Argentina) 337 km downstream in Rio de la Plata (Argentina) in 1930 in 66 hours 15 minutes
10. Vicki Keith (Canada) 80.2 km, all butterfly crossing of Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2005 in 63 hours 40 minutes
11. Feng Yao-Hsien (China)s 161 km along the Tzuya River in northeast China in 1965 in 61 hours
12. Abdul Latif Abou Heif (Egypt) 458 km) downstream in Rio de la Plata (Argentina) in 1970 in 60 hours 0 minutes
13. Vicki Keith (Canada) 103 km) in a two-way crossing of Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1987 in 56 hours 10 minutes
14. Sarah Thomas (USA) 131.6 km) in a crossing of Lake Powell, Arizona-Utah (USA) in 2016 in 56 hours 5 minutes
15. Martin Strel (Slovenia) 162 km) from Lignano to Ravenna (Italy) in the Adriatic Sea in 1994 in 55 hours 11 minutes
16. Vicki Keith (Canada) 72 km) in Lake Michigan (Illinois, USA) in 1988 in 52 hours 45 minutes
17. V.S. Kumar Anandan (Sri Lanka) 58 km) in a two-way crossing of the Palk Strait between Talaimannar, Sri Lanka to Dhanushkodi, Tamil Nadu, India in 1994 in 51 hours
18. Alex Cape (Canada): 94.2 km) in Cowichan Lake in Canada in August 2015 in 50 hours 36 minutes
19. Zhang Jian (China) 123 km) in Bohai Bay (China) in 2000 in 50 hours 22 minutes
20. Veljko Rogošić (Croatia) 171 km) across the Adriatic Sea in Italy in 2006 in 50 hours 10 minutes
21. Imre Szénási (Hungary) 250 km) in a river swim from Vienna to Budapest in 50 hours
22. Vicki Keith (Canada) 77.2 km) in Lake Huron (USA-to-Canada) in 1988 in 46 hours 55 minutes
23. Imre Szénási (Hungary) 240 km) from Kiskore to Szeged, Hungary in 1972 in 45 hours 57 minutes
24. Imre Szénási (Hungary) 219 km) in the River Tisza from Tiszasülly to Szeged in Romania in 1966 in 44 hours 50 minutes
25. Otto Kemmerich (Germany) 81 km) across Danzig in East Prussia in the Baltic Sea in 1928 in 43 hours 30 minutes
26. Sean O’Connell (Bermuda) 360.3 km) around Bermuda in 1976 in 43 hours 27 minutes
27. Khitindra Chandra Baishya (Bangladesh) 146 km) in the Kangha River in Bangladesh in 43 hours 25 minutes
28. Ersin Aydin (Turkey) 96 km) from Turkey to Cyprus in 1973 in 43 hours 20 minutes
29. Kevin Murphy (UK) 77.2 km) in Lake Balaton (Hungary) in 1973 in 43 hours 15 minutes
30. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina, photo above) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel in 1961 in 43 hours 10 minutes
31. Vedika Bolliger (Switzerland) approximately 75 km) across Lake Geneva in 1999 in 42 hours 45 minutes
32. Chloë McCardel (Australia) 126 km) from Eleuthera to Nassau in the Bahamas in 2014 in 42 hours 30 minutes
33. Firas Moualla (Syria) 124 km) from Cape Andreas on the island of Cyrus to Latakia City in Syria in 2007 in 42 hours 0 minutes
34. V.S. Kumar Anandan (Sri Lanka) 59 km) across the Palk Strait from Valvettithurai, Sri Lanka to Point Calimere, India in 1963 in 42 hours
35. Imre Szénási] (Hungary) 241 km) from Bratislava to Budapest, Hungary in 1967 in 41 hours 40 minutes
36. Martin Strel (Slovenia) 100.5 km) from Venice (Italy) to Portorose (Slovenia) in 1996 in 41 hours 11 minutes
37. Jay Serdula (Canada) 45 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2008 in 41 hours 1 minute
38. Tien Pao Jan (China) 110 km) along the Tzuya River in northeast China in 1965 in 41 hours
39. Penny Palfrey (Australia) 108 km) from Little Cayman to Grand Cayman (Cayman Islands) in 2011 in 40 hours 41 minutes
40. Wendy Trehiou (Jersey) 67.5 km) two-way crossing of the English Channel in 2013 in 39 hours 9 minutes
41. Susie Maroney (Australia) 93 km) from Mexico to Cuba in 1998 in 38 hours 33 minutes
42. Jon Erikson (USA) 101.3 km) in a three-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1981 in 38 hours 27 minutes
43. María Digna Ezcurra de Ortellado 179 km) downstream from Asunción to Formosa in 1954 in 38 hours 20 minutes
44. Vojislav Mijić (Serbia) 175 km) down the River Danube in Eastern Europe in 1994 in 38 hours 12 minutes
45. Ted Erikson (USA) 96.5 km) in a pro race in Lake Michigan (Illinois, USA) in 1963 in 37 hours 31 minutes
46. Miyuki Fujita (Japan) 58 km) in a three-way crossing of the Tsugaru Channel (Japan) in 2006 in 37 hours 24 minutes
47. Ted Erikson (USA) 59 km) in a pro race in Lake Michigan (Illinois, USA) in 1961 in 36 hours 37 minutes
48. Martin Strel (Slovenia) 100.5 km) from Koper (Slovenia) to Venice (Italy) in 1999 in 36 hours 30 minutes
49. Zhang Jian (China) 69 km) across Xingkai Lake in 2010 in 36 hours 30 minutes
50. Vojislav Mijić (Serbia) 139 km) down the Sava River, Serbia in 1992 in 36 hours 30 minutes
51. [Imre Szénási]]] (Hungary) 76 km) from Balatonkenese to Keszthely in Lake Balaton, Hungary in 1961 in 36 hours 29 minutes
52. Sally Minty-Gravett, MBE (Jersey) 67.6 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1975 in 36 hours 26 minutes
53. Tita Llorens (Spain), 90.8 km) in an unprecedented crossing of the Canal de Ibiza between the Spanish mainland and Ibiza in 2018 in 36 hours 16 minutes
54. Chloë McCardel (Australia) 101 km) in a three-way crossing of the English Channel in 2015 in 36 hours 12 minutes
55. Kevin Murphy (UK) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1975 in 36 hours 3 minutes
56. Dr. Harry Briggs (USA) 51.5 km from Canada to Ohio across Lake Erie in 35 hours 55 minutes
57. Ted Erikson (USA) 80.4 km) in a pro race in Lake Michigan (Illinois, USA) in 1962 in 35 hours 37 minutes
58. Mihir Sen (India) 82 km) across the Panama Canal (Pacific-Atlantic Oceans) in 1966 in 35 hours 30 minutes
59. Diane Struble (USA) 51 km in Lake George (New York, USA) in 1958 in 35 hours 30 minutes
60. John Munro (Canada) 56 km across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2003 in 35 hours 15 minutes
61. Kevin Murphy (UK) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1970 in 35 hours 10 minutes
62. Lisa Cummins (Ireland) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2009 in 35 hours 0 minutes
63. Alison Streeter MBE (UK) 101 km) in a three-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1990 in 34 hours 40 minutes
64. Abdul Latif Abou Heif (Egypt) 96.5 km) in Lake Michigan (Illinois, USA) in 1963 in 34 hours 38 minutes
65. Cindy Cleveland (USA) 77 km) in a circumnavigation around Catalina Island (California, USA) in 1979 in 34 hours 24 minutes
66. Paul Chotteau (France) 32.5 km) in a crossing of the Catalina Channel (California, USA) in 1936 in 33 hours 50 minutes
67. Stacy Chanin (USA) 98 km) in a triple circumnavigation of Manhattan Island (New York, USA) in 1984 in 33 hours 39 minutes
68. Yuko Matsuzaki (Japan) 83 km) in Lake Cane (Florida, USA) in 2008 in 33 hours 24 minutes
69. Sandra Blewitt (New Zealand) 80.6 km) across Lake Taupo, New Zealand in 1986 in 33 hours 21 minutes
70. Courtney Moates Paulk (USA) 64.6 km) in a two-way Catalina Channel crossing in 2017 in 33 hours 13 minutes
71. Mark Sheridan (Great Britain) 69 km) across Lake Geneva in Switzerland in 33 hours 6 minutes
72. Skip Storch (USA) 137 km) in a triple circumnavigation around Manhattan Island (New York, USA) in 2007 in 32 hours 52 minutes
73. Jaimie Monahan (USA) 69 km) in a crossing of Lake Geneva in Switzerland in 2015 in 32 hours 52 minutes
74. Dr. Nicholas Murch (Great Britain) 69 km) in a crossing of Lake Geneva in Switzerland in 2016 in 32 hours 46 minutes
75. Carlos Costa (Canada) 45 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1993 in 32 hours 43 minutes
76. Kevin Murphy (UK) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1987 in 32 hours 42 minutes
77. Jenna Lambert (Canada) 33 km) across the east end of Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2006 in 32 hours 18 minutes
78. George Dempsey (USA) 51.5 km) in a crossing of Lake George, New York (USA) in 1967 in 32 hours 15 minutes
79. Jose Cortinas (Cuba) 32.5 km) in a crossing of the Catalina Channel (California, USA) in 1953 in 32 hours 10 minutes
80. Alex Cape (Canada) swam 70 km) across the length of Cowichan Lake in August 2014 together with Susan Simmons in 32 hours 0 minutes
81. Susan Simmons (Canada) swam 70 km) across the length of Cowichan Lake in August 2014 together with Alex Cape in 32 hours 0 minutes
82. Brenda Sherratt (UK) 36.2 km) in a crossing of Loch Ness (Scotland) in 1966 in 31 hours 27 minutes
83. Bill Stevens (USA) 51.5 km) in a crossing of Lake George, New York (USA) in 1962 in 31 hours 27 minutes
84. Myrtle Huddleston (USA) swam in Del Ray Beach, Florida (USA) in 1928 for 31 hours 18 minutes
85. Chris Stockdale, MBE (England) swam 51.5 km across the length of Lake Garda (Italy) from Torbole to Peschiera in 1989 in 31 hours 10 minutes
86. Ray Gandy (USA) 74 km) in a two-way crossing of Lake Memphremagog (Vermont, USA to Quebec, Canada) in 2012 in 31 hours 5 minutes
87. Vicki Keith (Canada) 51 km all butterfly) in a crossing of Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1989 in 31 hours 0 minutes
88. Greta Andersen (USA) 80.5 km) in a pro race in Lake Michigan (Illinois, USA) in 1962 in 31 hours
89. Hamza Bakircioglu (Turkey) 64 km) in a crossing of the Bodensee in 2016 in 30 hours 45 minutes
90. Ted Erikson (USA) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1965 in 30 hours 3 minutes
91. Sarah Thomas (USA) 80.4 km) in a two-way crossing of Lake Memphremagog (Canada-USA) in 2013 in 30 hours 1 minute
92. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina) 80.5 km) across the Rio de la Plata (Uruguay-Argentina) in 1950 in 30 hours 0 minutes
93. Yuko Matsuzaki (Japan) 83 km) in Lake Cane (Florida, USA) in 2007 in 29 hours 55 minutes
94. Jon Erikson (USA) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1975 in 29 hours 50 minutes
95. Martin Strel (Slovenia) 78 km) from Africa to Europe in 1997 in 29 hours 36 minutes
96. Jerry Ferris (USA) in a crossing of Lake George, New York (USA) in 1983 in 29 hours 15 minutes
97. Abdul Latif Abou Heif (Egypt) in Montreal (Canada) in 1966 in 29 hours 0 minutes
98. Kim Middleton (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1993 in 29 hours 0 minutes
99. Vedika Bolliger (Switzerland) 56 km) across Lake Zurich both ways from Zurich to Rapperswil and back in 29 hours 0 minutes
100. Jose Cortinas (Cuba) 32.5 km) in a crossing of the Catalina Channel (California, USA) in 1952 in 28 hours 55 minutes
101. Jackie Cobell (UK) 33.7 km) across the English Channel (England-France) in 2010 in 28 hours 44 minutes
102. Batista Pereira (Portugal) 206 km) down the Tejo River (Portugal) in 1959 in 28 hours 43 minutes
103. Tina Neill (USA) 83.6 km) from San Clemente Island to California (USA) in 2012 in 28 hours 41 minutes
104. Anne Cleveland (USA) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2004 in 28 hours 36 minutes
105. Jaimie Monahan (USA) 69 km) in a crossing of Lake Geneva in Switzerland in 2015 in 28 hours 36 minutes
106. Philip Rush (New Zealand) 101.3 km) in a three-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1987 in 28 hours 21 minutes
107. Tita Llorens (Spain) 84.3 km) across Cruce Canal Ibiza-Mallorca from Ibiza to Mallorca, Spain in 2015 in 28 hours 13 minutes
108. Jason Betley (USA) 32.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the Catalina Channel in 2015 in 28 hours 10 minutes
109. Bridget Simpson (USA) 51.8 km) from Lake George Village to Ticonderoga across Lake George in New York in 28 hours 2 minutes
110. Martin Strel (Slovenia) 105 km) down the Krka River (Slovenia) in 1992 in 28 hours 0 minutes
111. Deirdre Ward (Ireland): 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2016 in 27 hours 52 minutes
112. Ray Gandy (USA) 73 km) in Narraganset Bay (Rhode Island, USA) in 2011 in 27 hours 42 minutes
113. Liane Llewellyn (UK) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2009 in 27 hours 35 minutes
114. Diana Nyad (USA) 82 km) from the North Bimini Island (Bahamas) to Florida (USA) in 1979 in 27 hours 30 minutes
115. Des Renford MBE (Australia) 93 km) from Sydney Harbour to North Wollongong Harbour (Australia) in 1974 in 27 hours 29 minutes
116. Nick Adams (UK) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1995 in 27 hours 28 minutes
117. Jorge Crivilles Villanueva (Spain) 105 km Javea-Ibiza in 2013 in 27 hours 15 minutes
118. Rick Goodwin (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1994 in 27 hours 6 minutes
119. Vicki Keith (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1986 in 26 hours 59 minutes
120. Greta Andersen (USA/Denmark) 65 km) in a two-way crossing of the Catalina Channel (California, USA) in 26 hours 53 minutes
121. Kevin Murphy (UK) 90 km) around the Isle of Wight (UK) in 1971 in 26 hours 51 minutes
122. Stella Taylor (USA) in a crossing of Lake George, New York (USA) in 1977 in 26 hours 51 minutes
123. Henry Sullivan (USA) 33.7 km) in a crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 1923 in 26 hours 50 minutes
124. Murugapillai Navratnaswami 59 km) in a crossing of the Palk Strait swim from Valevettithurai, Sri Lanka to Point Calimere, India in 1954 in 26 hours 50 minutes
125. John Bulsza (USA) 55 km) across Lake Huron (USA-to-Canada) in 1996 in 26 hours 49 minutes
126. Annaleise Carr (Canada) 50.5 km) across Lake Ontario (USA-to-Canada) in 2012 in 26 hours 41 minutes
127. Anna Wardley (UK) 90 km) around the Isle of Wight (UK) in 2013 in 26 hours 33 minutes
128. Kim Lumsdon (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2006 in 26 hours 27 minutes
129. Doreen Miller (USA), 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel in 2014 in 26 hours 21 minutes
130. Michael Read MBE (UK) 67.5 km) in a four-way crossing of Windermere (England) in 1972 in 26 hours 16 minutes
131. Alper Sunaçoğlu (Turkey) 78 km) from Turkey to Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea in 2010 in 26 hours 15 minutes
132. Kim Middleton (Canada) 47 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1994 in 26 hours 14 minutes
133. Susan Baddeley (Scotland) 34.7 km) across Loch Lomond (Scotland) in 1960 in 26 hours 10 minutes
134. Mike Read MBE (UK) 67.5 km) four-way crossing of Windermere in 26 hours 3 minutes
135. Shelagh Freedman (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1993 in 26 hours 3 minutes
136. Tony Bailey (UK) 33.7 km) across the English Channel in 2014 in 25 hours 56 minutes
137. Pat Budney (USA) 42 km) across Lake Erie from Canada to USA in 1975 in 25 hours 52 minutes
138. Stuart Johnson (Australia) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel in 2011 in 25 hours 50 minutes
139. Mihir Sen (India) 59 km) across the Palk Strait from Valvettithurai, Sri Lanka to Point Calimere, India in 1966 in 25 hours 44 minutes
140. Paula Stephanson (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Michigan (USA) in 2009 in 25 hours 38 minutes
141. Forrest Nelson (USA) 77 km) in a circumnavigation around Catalina Island (California, USA) in 2011 in 25 hours 35 minutes
142. Attila Manyoki (Hungary) 80 km) in Lake Balaton (Hungary) in 2008 in 25 hours 32 minutes
143. Alejandro Larriera (Argentina) 57 km) upstream against the Parana River in Argentina along the Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda course in 1988 in 25 hours 11 minutes
144. Bob Weir (Canada) 54 km) across Lake Manitoba in 1963 in 25 hours 10 minutes
145. Bob Weir (Canada) 56 km) across Lakes Couchiching/Simcoe (Canada) in 1991 in 25 hours 8 minutes
146. Bill Sadlo (America) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 1957 in 25 hours 1 minute
147. Palmer Donnelly (USA) 56 km) around Staten Island (New York, USA) in 1961 in 25 hours 0 minutes
148. Attila Mányoki (Hungary) 68 km) in the Swimming Marathon of the Messinian Gulf (Greece) in 2011 in 25 hours 0 minutes
149. Elizabeth Fry (USA) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2011 in 24 hours 41 minutes
150. Michael Read MBE (UK) 90 km) around the Isle of Wight (UK) in 1972 in 24 hours 36 minutes
151. Jaime Caballero (Spain) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2013 in 24 hours 35 minutes
152. Craig Lenning (USA) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of Lake Tahoe in 2013 in 24 hours 35 minutes
153. Boguslaw Stanislaw Ogrodnik (Poland) 34.18 km) in a crossing of Lake Tahoe in 2018 in 24 hours 34 minutes 18 seconds
154. Bridgette Hobart (USA) 60.9 km) in a crossing of Seneca, one of the New York Finger Lakes in 2015 in 24 hours 31 minutes
155. Stephanie Hopson (USA) 33.7 km) in a crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2016 in 24 hours 31 minutes
156. Cindy Cleveland (USA) 65 km) in a two-way crossing of the Catalina Channel (California, USA) in 1977 in 24 hours 30 minutes
157. Jon Erikson (USA) 59 km) in Lake Michigan (Michigan City - Chicago, Illinois, USA) in 1971 in 24 hours 30 minutes
158. Stuart Johnson (Australia) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel in 2012 in 24 hours 30 minutes
159. Madhu Nagaraja (India) 41.3 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2012 in 24 hours 29 minutes
160. Susanne Robinson (Canada) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2010 in 24 hours 28 minutes
161. Pat Gallant-Charette (USA) 51 km) across Lake Ontario (Canada) in 2017 in 24 hours 28 minutes
162. Bruno Baumgartner (Swiss) 68.06 km across Lake Constance (German: Bodensee) (Germany) in 2013 in 24 hours 20 minutes
163. Lilian Harrison (Argentina) 48 km) swam the river Plate (Uruguay) in 1923 in 24 hours 19 minutes
164. Marcy MacDonald (USA) 67.5 km) in a two-way crossing of the English Channel in 2013 in 24 hours 16 minutes
165. Guy Cohen (Israel): 70.57 km) swim in the Mediterranean Sea near Haifa, Israel in 24 hours 13 minutes
166. John Muenzer (USA) 57.9 km) across Lake Erie (Canada to USA) in 24 hours 12 minutes
167. Beth French (UK) 42 km) across the Molokai Channel (Molokai to Oahu) in 24 hours 10 minutes
168. Anna McClarnon (UK) 33.7 km in a crossing of the English Channel (England-France) in 2002 in 24 hours 8 minutes
169. Wendy Trehiou (Jersey) 57.4 km) from Saint Malo to Jersey in 2015 in 24 hours 7 minutes
170. Enrique Tirabocchi (Italy) 51.9 km down the River de la Plata (Argentina) in 1920 in 24 hours 2 minutes
171. Amy Hiland (USA) 32.5 km in a crossing of the Catalina Channel (California, USA) in 1958 in 24 hours 0 minutes 25 seconds

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Swimming To Sardinia

Courtesy of Night Train Swimmers, Corsica to Sardinia, Mediterranean Sea.

Henry and David Holscher completed a Night Train Swimmers tandem crossing of the Strait of Bonifacio in 5 hours 13 minutes.

They reported on the charity swim on behalf of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, "Our swim was more difficult than expected. There was significant current and wind. Our course was circuitous at best. Henry swam incredibly well. It was a beautiful day."

The father-and-son tandem team were the second and third Americans to complete the cross-border swim between the French island of Corsica and Italian island of Sardinia that divide the Tyrrhenian Sea from the western Mediterranean Sea.

Their crossing is a precursor to a separate race along the same course this coming weekend when Alessandro Pilati of the Circuito Gran Fondo Italia (Gran Fondo Italia Series) will host the season-ending 15-17 km Gran Fondo Bocche di Bonifacio.

Luca Salati comfortably leads the men's rankings going into the season-ending crossing while five women (Claire Deanoz Marie, Fabia Maramotti, Sigsgaard Grith, Stefania Bove and Camilla Montalbetti) could potentially capture the title with a win across the Strait of Bonifacio.



For more information on the Gran Fondo Bocche di Bonifacio, visit www.circuitgranfondoitalia.it.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Merger That Shook Up And Revitalized The Sport


Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

For 33 years, Brent Rutemiller has led Sports Publications International that publishes Swimming World Magazine.

Along the way, he also coached for decades and published SWIM, Swimming Technique and Water Polo Scoreboard magazines, and SwimInfo.com and produced The Morning Show as published a number of important stories from exposing drug-taking scandals to authoring Below the Surface, a groundbreaking book about the administrative side of coaching that USA Swimming recommended to its coaches and swim team officers. It was the first comprehensive collection of procedures and policies to unify a team's mission with its attitudes and expectations.

But it was in November 2017 when he really shook up the aquatics world when he merged the International Swimming Hall of Fame with Swimming World Magazine. The merger was a completely unexpected and visionary as Rutemiller has now combined the archives of the history of the sport with contemporary reporting and future prognostications.

His vision for the sport of swimming is now being executed as he concurrently services as the Chief Executive Officer of the International Swimming Hall of Fame and Swimming World Magazine.

Bill Kent, chairman of the International Swimming Hall of Fame Board of Directors, explained the announcement in 2017, “ISHOF is entering into a new era with the retirement of Bruce Wigo and the merger with Swimming World. With Brent Rutemiller as the new leader and with his generous gift of the Swimming World business to ISHOF, the combined organization will have a platform for sending the good message about the benefits of aquatic activities to the world at a new level."

Rutemiller describes the synergy among two of the best-known brands in the swimming community, “The driving force behind the merger is to combine the areas that ISHOF and Swimming World have in common. The merger is a synergy of strengths. Sports Publications International will remain a separate entity, but will spin off its Swimming World Magazine division to become the marketing arm of ISHOF. The merger is a classic example of the whole being greater than its parts.

Swimming World Magazine reports the news, and the International Swimming Hall of Fame archives the news. Swimming World owns the copyrights to one of the largest reserves of aquatic images and content in the world. ISHOF is the repository for historical items. Swimming World reports and ISHOF honors swimming, water polo, synchro, diving, open water, masters and Paralympic athletes on a worldwide level.

We will invest heavily in the next generation of internet connectivity, expanded content, and interactive museum exhibits.

I have been at every level of this community for over 45 years and I have never been more excited about the impact that this will have on aquatics worldwide. We will merge these institutions in a way that will benefit everyone in the swimming community. I see many positive outcomes from this merger
."

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Round And Round She Goes

Courtesy of WOWSA, Bowen Island, Canada.

"Spots of warm water saved me," recalled Jessi Harewicz who recently completed a solo 33 km circumnavigation swim around Bowen Island in Howe Sound near Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada.

The 34-year-old Canadian's ultimate tally: 21 hours 0 minutes 25 seconds swimming in 12°C water including the times that she had to keep swimming against the currents and swam in place at several times.

Her excitement in the sport comes from both her experiences in and out of the water. "I’ve met so many amazing people in the open water swimming community in Europe and the US and Canada including Marilyn Bell."

In addition to her 28.6 km crossing of the Georgia Strait from Sechelt to Nanaimo in Canada's British Columbia in 11 hours 20 minutes and a 17 hour 34 minute crossing of the English Channel and a 15 hour 30 minute crossing of the Catalina Channel, she also completed the 20 km Mercer Island Marathon Swim in 8 hours 21 minutes earlier this year. "3 in a year including two swim over 30 km...finally I can recover and do it all over again.

Every time I enter the ocean, the swim is different. The marks on land may be the same. But everything else is constantly changing.
"



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Nejib Belhedi Swims For 76 Hours 30 Minutes

Courtesy of Nejib Belhedi, Sfax, Tunisia.

Nejib Belhedi completed his 120 km non-stop swim from the Southern Salin Basin in Thyna-Sfax through the middle of Boughrara Lake to Scorpion Tour Island in Djerba in 76 hours 30 minutes in his native Tunisia.

He wore a stinger suit at night - a lesson learned from his Sicilian Channel Swim in 1995 - and was escorted by Jalel Ghandri aboard the escort boat Aladin.

Belhedi will be honored at the 2018 WOWSA Talks & WOWSA Awards on November 10th at The Olympic Club in San Francisco, California. To meet the 2016 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year who also completed the 2011 World Open Water Swimming Performance of the Year for his 1400 km stage swim in Tunisia, register here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sharkwater: Extinction Exposes

Courtesy of Rob Stewart, Sharkwater Extinction.

Sharkwater: Extinction (2018) is a thrilling and inspiring action packed journey that follows Canadian filmmaker, biologist and activist Rob Stewart as he exposes the massive illegal shark fin industry and the political corruption behind it — a conspiracy that is leading to the extinction of sharks.

From West Africa, Spain, Panama, Costa Rica, France, and even in our own backyard, Stewart’s third film dives into the often violent underworld of the pirate fishing trade to expose a multi-billion dollar industry. Shark finning is still rampant, shark fin soup is still being consumed on an enormous scale, and endangered sharks are now also being used to make products for human consumption. Stewart’s mission is to save the sharks and oceans before it’s too late.



For more information, visit Sharkwater Extinction.

>www.sharkwater.com.

Carina Bruwer Goes Three For Three

Courtesy of Carina Bruwer Pugliese, Capo Mortola, Italy.

South African musician Carina Bruwer completed her charity cross-border swim from France via Monaco to Italy called the Triple Country Swim today.

"The moment I stepped onto Italian land - or rock - after swimming for 7 hours 6 minutes from the South of France, a route that included the full length of Monaco. The water was rough and the current was against me, but every stroke today had meaning as this swim is making a different to @Muzukidz - children from Cape Town townships who are given the opportunity to learn the violin.

The feeling of finishing [the 21 km Triple Country Swim from Nice, france to Monte Carlo, Monaco to Capo Mortola, Italy] was overwhelming, and so is the support we have received.

Thank you to everyone who has donated and followed the swim, and please keep sharing and canvassing for support. We have not reached our target yet and every bit helps
."

Bruwer explains her motivation for the swim, “I believe that giving a child the opportunity to learn a musical instrument goes way beyond the ability to make music or the possibility of being a musician one day. Music stimulates the brain in a very special way; in fact studies have shown that children who do 14 months of musical training displayed more powerful structural and functional brain changes. Imagine what this can do for a young child who comes from a poor background and who has limited opportunities and a limited support structure. I am convinced that organisations like Muzukidz are helping to mould our future leaders, inventors and change makers.

I am knackered. The conditions were beautiful for the first hour of the swim, but it then became very choppy for the remaining 6 hours. The current that was against me was also unexpected; the prevailing current usually goes the other way. Still, every stroke today had meaning as this swim is making a different to @Muzukidz - children from Cape Town townships who are given the opportunity to learn the violin. The feeling of finishing was overwhelming, and so is the support we have received.”

A donation platform is available on www.carina.co.za and here.

For more information on the Muzukidz Social Project, visit here.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program