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Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Science In Sport On Swimming

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Science in Sport published a free 12-page document that provides ocean swimming tips for a 2 km swim (in Australia, but applicable anywhere), its nutritional products explanation, and pool training plans ranging from 2 km to 2.6 km in length.

SiS, founded in 1992, is headquartered in London and offers a range of sports nutrition products for competitive athletes. At the 2012 London Olympic Games, 24 medal-winning athletes or teams used its products.

Ardziv Simonian explains the free downloadable document. "This new swimming guide from Science in Sport focuses on preparing for 2 km swims. It's aimed at keen swimmers with tips on training including a scheduled plan, nutrition, technique, tactics, and recovery."

Interested athletes can download it for free here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Elena Pavlova Swimming From Ukraine To New York

Photos courtesy of Bailey Photography. Article courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

26-year-old Elena Pavlova of Brooklyn, New York completed the 18.3-mile (29.4 km) Stage 1 leg of the 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim. But her roots back in swimming started when she first learn to swim at the age of 10 in a local river near her home in Ukraine.

"It was the head-up breaststroke, froggie style. That's when I've learned the doggie paddle too. The first time I went to the pool I was 13. The coach at the pool told me, "You are too old. You can't even kick and you will never be a swimmer."

But even at that young age, Pavlova showed her determination. "After she saw me swimming six month later, she changed her mind."

She continued swimming, but when started college at the age of 16, her school did not have a swim team. "So I just swam on my own. The two years when I actually swam on a team was when I was 20-21. I swam with 13-year-old boys and was always the last swimmer drafting behind them."

Her life took a different turn and she then moved to United States from Okhtyrka, a small town in Ukraine. Not only on dryland, but also in the water, her life was about to be transformed. "I will be no exception when I say I started thinking about winter swimming after reading Lynne Cox's 'Swimming to Antarctica'. Soon after, I started swimming with the famous Coney Island Polar Bear Club and I loved it. It is mental sport more than anything and for that I love it."

Along the way, she also picked up open water and winter swimming while she started coaching. "I swam with Agua Masters for about a year, but I consider my home team to be CIBBOWS (Coney Island Brighton Beach Open Water Swimmers)."

After being inspired by Lynne Cox's book, she found the hardest thing to do about winter swimming is to find people who can do it with you or at least watch you while you swim. "It's easier to do it with someone else and it's a huge safety issue. Other than that, you just have to do it. The water feels cold, but you have to stay just a little longer for the initial shock to pass in order to feel the beauty of it."

After completing the 29.4 km Stage 1 of the 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim, she discussed the differences between winter swimming and marathon swimming. "Winter swimming and marathon swimming are both completely different, but at the same time they compliment each other.

A lot of marathon swimmers train in colder water to adjust their bodies for the longer swims. Even though upper 60°F's might not feel that cold, after being in that water for several hours, your body will start getting cold. Swimming throughout the winter helps to build up tolerance to cold, plus it boosts your immune system so you don't get sick.

The harder one I would say is marathon swimming as winter swimming is usually shorter distances so you are in and out before you know it while marathons you have to push through hour after hour
."

For more information, visit www.8bridges.org.

Additional articles on the 2016 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim:
*Pre-race: How Great To Swim All Eight; How Fun To Swim Just One
*History: Christie vs. Reinke Recalls Van Der Byl vs. Davies Battle
*Stage 1: Cheryl Reinke Wins 8 Bridges Stage 1 Marathon
*Stage 2: Paige Christie Overcomes Conditions At 8 Bridges

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Christie vs. Reinke Recalls Van Der Byl vs. Davies Battle

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The ongoing 2016 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim neck-and-neck battle between Paige Christie and Cheryl Reinke where only 20 seconds separates the leaders after 38.1 miles (61.2 km) reminds us of the famous 120-mile (193 km) race between Rondi Davies and Grace van der Byl in the 2012 event.

It was a classic East Coast versus West Coast duel; New Yorker versus Californian in a tight mano-a-mano battle. The duo went 1-2 in each of the 7 stages, swimming close throughout the world's longest open water swimming competition. "It definitely kept our heads in the game," recalls Davies.

Stage 1 Rip Van Winkle Bridge – Kingston Rhinecliff Bridge (18.3 miles/29.4 km) on June 25th 2012:
Grace van der Byl 4:31:18 vs. Rondi Davies 4:39:18

Stage 2 Kingston Rhinecliff Bridge – Mid-Hudson Bridge (19.8 miles/31.8 km) on June 26th 2012:
Grace van der Byl 5:28:45 (10:00:03 cumulative time) vs. Rondi Davies 5:37:36 (10:16:54 cumulative time)

Stage 3 Mid-Hudson Bridge – Newburgh Beacon Bridge (13.2 miles/21.2 km)) on June 27th 2012:
Grace van der Byl 3:42:31 (13:42:34 cumulative time) vs. Rondi Davies 3:45:15 (14:02:09 cumulative time)

Stage 4 Newburgh Beacon Bridge – Bear Mountain Bridge (15.2 miles/24.4 km) on June 28th 2012:
Grace van der Byl 4:10:46 (17:53:20 cumulative time) vs. Rondi Davies 4:19:53 (18:22:02 cumulative time)

Stage 5 Bear Mountain Bridge – Tappan Zee Bridge (19.8 miles/31.8 km) on June 30th 2012:
Grace van der Byl 6:05 (23:58:20 cumulative time) vs. Rondi Davies 6:11:43 (24:33:45 cumulative time)

Stage 6 Tappan Zee Bridge – George Washington Bridge (15.7 miles/25.2 km) on July 1st 2012:
Grace van Byl 3:28:01 (27:26:41 cumulative time) vs. Rondi Davies 3:34:10 (28:07:55 cumulative time)

Stage 7 George Washington Bridge – Verrazano Narrows Bridge (18.6 miles/29.1 km) on July 2nd 2012:
Grace van der Byl 4:21:31 (31:47:52 cumulative time) vs. Rondi Davies 4:28:38 (32:36:33 cumulative time)

Additional articles on the 2016 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim:
*Pre-race: How Great To Swim All Eight; How Fun To Do Just One
*Stage 1: Cheryl Reinke Wins 8 Bridges Stage 1 Marathon
*Competitor: Elena Pavlova Swimming From Ukraine To New York
*Stage 2: Paige Christie Overcomes Conditions At 8 Bridges

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Monday, June 27, 2016

Paige Christie Overcomes Conditions At 8 Bridges

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Mother Nature had her way in today's Stage 2 during the 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim between the Kingston Rhinecliff Bridge and the Mid-Hudson Bridge.

Rondi Davies reported on the conditions of the world's longest competitive open water swim. "Today we had a strong headwind that created large swells and significantly slowed the outgoing ebb current which meant swimmers had to swim into a strong flood for the last 1.5 or more miles of the swim."

Only four of fourteen veteran marathon swimmers finished under the turbulent conditions of the 19.8-mile (31.8 km) leg in the 76°F (24.4°C) water.

"There are plenty of war stories behind all of today's swims. But there were great, gallant efforts by the swimmers and the kayakers who had to deal with the conditions while looking after their swimmers."

Stage 2 The Lighthouses Results:
1. Paige Christie 7:56:45 (total time: 13:01:23; second of 7 stages)
2. Cheryl Reinke 7:57:05 (total time: 12:55:50; second of 7 stages)
3. Ed Riley 9:04:42
4. Michele Walters 9:19:42
5. Devon Clifford DNF (second of 7 stages)
6. Steve Gruenwald DNF (second of 7 stages)
7. Thomas W. Kofler DNF (second of 7 stages)
8. Jamie Tout DNF (second of 7 stages)
9. Cristian Vergara DNF (second of 7 stages)
10. Erica Flickinger DNF (second of 7 stages)
11. Todd Erickson DNF
12. James Braddock DNF
13. Spencer Schneider DNF
14. David Barra DNF

Throughout the history of the event, only 4 swimmers have completed all 7 stages in one week: Grace van der Byl, Rondi Davies, Andrew Malinak and Lori King. There can now only be two swimmers from this year's challengers who can join that esteemed group: Christie and Reinke who were only separated by 20 seconds and remain in a neck-and-neck battle for the overall lead.

For more information, visit www.8bridges.org.

Additional articles on the 2016 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim:
*Pre-race: How Great To Swim All Eight; How Fun To Do Just One
*History: Christie vs. Reinke Recalls Van Der Byl vs. Davies Battle
*Stage 1: Cheryl Reinke Wins 8 Bridges Stage 1 Marathon
*Competitor: Elena Pavlova Swimming From Ukraine To New York

23-year-old Paige Christie and 51-year-old Cheryl Reinke shown above.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Open Water Results In The US Olympic Team Trials

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

While Dana Vollmer made the USA Olympic Swim Team in the 100m butterfly today, Stephanie Peacock is still in the hunt in the 400m freestyle, seeded fifth in the finals with a time of 4:08.23 in the 400m freestyle at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials.

But Haley Anderson just missed making the finals by 0.4 seconds as she finished 9th in 4:10.90 while Ashley Twichell finished 11th in 4:11.17 and Becca Mann did not advance to the final heats, finishing 14th in 4:11.59.

Peacock, Anderson, Twichell and Mann will compete again in the heats of the 800m freestyle.

Twichell is shown above with a therapy dog that is available to help relieve stress by the athletes.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Getting Steve Walker To Smile After The Drop

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Steve Walker did an ice mile in 2.7°C (37°F) 20 years ago in 1996.

With an attempt at the North Channel between Scotland and Northern Ireland coming up in August, Walker attempted a swim across the Strait of Juan de Fuca between America and neighboring Canada.

But with the water dropping to 46°F (7.7°C), Walker only managed 10.8 miles instead of accomplishing the entire crossing of 13.8 miles.

Walker recalls the experience. "The water was nearly flat, just small texture and almost no wind - which is rare for up here. I didn’t know the water temperature until after I got out. It felt cold from the start and I knew it was cold, but I had been assuming it was 49°F (9.4°C). When I got in, I was not confident that I’d make it, but it wasn’t my mind that stopped me. The first three hours were just cold.

I did pretty ok in general. Although my hands and feet hurt, I was doing well. Feeds were well, averaging about 20 seconds. Sun was out. My stroke count was very high for me — averaging around 72 strokes per minute. I’m usually in the mid-50s. I think [my stroke count] was just so I could keep my core temperature up. I was pushing a lot of water and moving at a fast clip - at 23-minute miles
."

But after three hours, problems started. "My arms started hurting. They were not sore, but they just weren’t responding well. My brain was doing fine, and I was OK mentally, so I just pushed harder. A little while later, maybe around 30 minutes later, I realized that I couldn’t eat or drink. My stomach wasn’t upset and I wasn’t seasick; my stomach was just no longer working. It was likely it getting no blood/oxygen. Also at 3.5 hours, I took about 3 ounces of liquid - warm 50/50 Snapple - which ended up being my last real feed."

At four hours, pain set in. "I felt pain in my lower back. Not muscle pain, but a deep pointed pain on either side. I realized that my kidneys were shutting down.

Then the pain in my arms came back. It had never really left, but I was just noticing it a lot more. It was mostly centered on my wrists. My hands had been fixed and not really movable for more than an hour, but I’d just ignored it. About the same time, my legs started seizing up, not cramping. It was coming from the top front of my thighs near my hips.

I tried to stretch out with some backstroke and took a feed at 4 hours 23 minutes when I spilled most of the drink. I did a little breaststroke. Then I took a few strokes of freestyle and realized that my muscles weren’t responding properly. It wasn’t a matter of just telling them to do something; my forearms were seizing and my upper and lower legs were seized. I couldn’t control them. I was all done
."

Even with his body at a standstill, his mind was still sharp. "I was cold to be sure; my core was probably at 91°F (32.7°C). I was shivering and my teeth were starting to chatter a little, but my mind was clear. I never didn’t know what was happening and was analyzing my how my body was reacting."

Once the swim was called off, he looked back on his effort. "I do wish I had finished, but I was actually quite happy with the swim. 4.5 hours at 46°F (7.7°C) is more than I would have expected I was capable of. I will be back to do this again, hopefully at 48-49°F (8.8-9.4°C).

When I got back on the boat, my core started warming up immediately. The boat was protected from the wind, so I tried something that has been working well last year — warming up slowly over a half hour. I’ve noticed that the drop seems to come when you warm up your skin. Your body feels it is safe, and it stops shunting blood away from the skin. The skin is still cold, though, and the blood from the skin causes the core temperature to drop
."

He drip dried on the boat about 3-4 minutes. Then he dried off with a towel for a few more minutes. "My skin was cold, maybe 50°F (10°C), but it was slowly warming up. I was still shivering at this point, but my teeth stopped chattering as soon as I was out of the water. I then put on a pair of light pants; next was shoes and socks, then a short sleeve shirt over a span of 15 minutes. I was still cold, but no longer shivering. I’m guessing my core temp was around 94°F (8.8-9.4°C) by this point. Then I put on a sweatshirt. My skin was slowly coming back up from what was probably around 50°F (10°C). By the time I got my jacket on after 25 minutes, my core temperature was getting closer to normal to 96°F (35.5°C)."

It took the escort boat an hour to reach Port Angeles. By that time, Walker's hands and feet still felt cold, but he was warm. "I was still wearing a jacket, but it came off 20 minutes later. I felt a little cold for the next few hours, but the cold came on in full force that night. I didn’t sleep at all that night — between twitching and the head cold. The head cold lasted about 3 days."

Back on the boat, observer Scott Lautman told him that the water in his upcoming North Channel attempt will be 8°F warmer.

"That made me smile."

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Location Is Beautiful, The People Are Beautiful

Courtesy of Samsung Boğaziçi Kıtalararası Yüzme Yarışı (Bosphorus Cross Continental Swim), Turkey.

Beauty, Brains And Trojan Brawn

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Catherine Vogt is married to an American military hero, has a beautiful young daughter, has coached world champions since 2005, and has helped the University of Southern California climb to the top ranks of American universities in the pool swimming world.

Her talents and passion has been long recognized by USA Swimming that has repeatedly selected her to be its head national open water swimming team coach at the 2009, 2013 and 2015 FINA World Championships as well as its Olympic open water swimming coach in both 2012 and 2016. She led USA Swimming to the open water swimming team title in 2015 and has coached both male and female world open water swimming champions (Chip Peterson and Haley Anderson).

Similarly, USC recently named her its Associate Head Coach for USC’s Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving teams after 8 years of service.

Senior Associate Athletic Director Donna Heinel announced, "Catherine has done a tremendous job during her time with our men’s and women’s programs. She’s a great leader and coach and an even better person. She’s been integral in our success and we’re proud of her achievements. She’s a true role model for all of our swimmers and divers.”

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Jessi Harewicz Crosses The Strait Of Georgia

Information courtesy of Masters Swimming Association of British Columbia. Photo courtesy of Emily Van Gulik.

The roll call of swimmers who have crossed the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and the mainland coast of British Columbia is not long:

* Ernst Yacub in 11 hours 13 minutes in 1967
* Mike Powley in 9 hours 23 minutes in 1967
* Fran Caldwell in 1972
* John McDermott in 1978
* Shane Collins in 9 hours 55 minutes in 1998
* Rod Craig in 9 hours 50 minutes in 2010
* James Monk in 9 hours 35 minutes in 2010
* Will Rogers in 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012 [in a wetsuit]
* Rachel Schoeler in 11 hours 55 minutes in 2014

Now add Jessi Harewicz to the list after her June 25th 11 hour 20 minute 30 km crossing from Sechelt to Nanaimo under the guidance of pilot John Dafoe.

She is grateful for the amount of assistance she was given. "I have met Rachel Schoeler many times before. Rod Craig was my observer. Most of my advice came from SwimTrek with Fiona Southwell and Kevin Murphy helping me network.

My father and I fell in love with the waters of British Columbia last year. I have a pool coach, but I realized that if I have someone who knows me very well and can kayak and feed with me, [then] we can go and swim in the gulf islands with only a short car drive
."

She acknowledges her luck with the conditions. "I had a bit of chop, but it was fine. Like it wasn't easy, but I've swam in worse conditions, I've been colder, I've swum in colder water and I've been way more seasick and I've been stung by way more jellyfish."

A radio interview with CBC's Chad Pawsonof is posted here.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Nailing It Before You Get In The Open Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

At the 2001 FINA World Championships in Fukuoka, Japan, we were given an assignment: find a manicurist for the USA women's national swim team.

It was much easier said than done 15 years ago when a vast majority of Japanese women did not paint their fingernails and manicurists were few and far between in Western Japan.

So we called the U.S. Embassy and asked the Consul where the American female diplomats did their nails in Fukuoka. They located a simple small shop where the manicurist did only the basics.

But in came the Natalie Coughlin, a 12-time Olympic medalist, and Haley Cope, an Olympics silver medalist. The teammates from University of California Berkeley requested some funky designs on their finger and toe nails. The Japanese manicurist took her assignment with intense seriousness and created some much-appreciated color on their appendages.

USA team coach Teri McKeever explained, "The women need something like this to relax and have fun before a major competition."

Since that time, we have seen more and more (almost everyone?) have the same desire to have a pre-race or pre-swim manicure and pedicure before their major open water swims.

Email us your most colorful designs before an open water swim to headcoach@openwatersource.com for a follow-up article on Colorful Nails In The Open Water.

Note: Today in Omaha, the 34-year-old Coughlin will swim in her fifth U.S. Olympic Swim Trials, trying to add to her legacy in and out of the water.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sunday, June 26, 2016

Cheryl Reinke Wins 8 Bridges Stage 1 Marathon

Results courtesy of Rondi Davies, New York Open Water.

The world's longest competitive open water swimming competition began today.

Race directors David Barra and Rondi Davies, in collaboration New York Open Water, provided the following results from Day One of the 6th annual 7-day, 7-stage 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim.

17 swimmers traversed 18.3 miles (29.4 km) down the Hudson River in Stage 1 from the Rip Van Winkle Bridge to the Kingston Rhinecliff Bridge with the water at 25°C (77°F). Stage 1 was won by 51-year-old phenom Cheryl Reinke.

"With the air temperature at 33°C (92°F), a south southwestern wind diminished the currents and made for a tough day, even though the water conditions were flat and near-perfect," said Davies.

Second place Paige Christie said, "It was a beautiful day 1 on the majestic Hudson. A huge thanks to Margrethe Hørlyck-Romanovsky for keeping me safe, fed, and motivated; she is incredible. The race directors are putting on a great event; I am so impressed with their relentless efforts and positivity. The water quality was great."

1 Cheryl Reinke of York Swim Club, South Carolina 4:58:45 [first of 7 stages]
2 Paige Christie of North Andover, Massachusetts 5:04:38 [first of 7 stages; shown in lower photo]
3 Charlie Nadel of Westport, Connecticut 5:30:15
4 Jamie Tout of Austin, Texas 5:39:23 [first of 7 stages]
5 Todd Erickson of San Antonio, Texas 5:40:49
6 John Hughes of Port Chester, New York 5:48:32
7 Devon Clifford of New Rochelle, New York 5:50:34 [first of 7 stages]
8 Kimberly Plewa of Rahway, New Jersey 6:05:08
9 Steve Gruenwald of Faribault, Minnesota 6:10:15 [first of 7 stages]
10 Laura Picardo of New York, New York 6:13:49
11 Elena Pavlova of Brooklyn, New York 6:17:30
12 Dongho Choi of Princeton, New Jersey 6:19:54
13 Erica Flickinger of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania 6:35:13 [shown in upper photo]
14 Cristian Vergara of Brooklyn New York / Chile 6:45:15 [first of 7 stages]
15 Martin Turecky of Pleasant Gap, Pennsylvania 6:54:21
16 Mo Siegel of Piermont, New York 7:23:20
17 Thomas W. Kofler of Meran, Italy 7:34:00 [first of 7 stages]

For one week, each day's marathon swim will begin north of one bridge and end on the south side of the next bridge, covering distances ranging from 13.2 miles to 19.8 miles.

Although the bulk of the swimmers are relatively close to the average age of 49, the age ranges from 17-year-old Nadel to 64-year-old .

For more information, visit
www.8bridges.org.

Additional articles on the 2016 8 Bridges Hudson River Swim:
*Pre-race: How Great To Swim All Eight; How Fun To Do Just One
*History: Christie vs. Reinke Recalls Van Der Byl vs. Davies Battle
*Stage 1 Competitor: Elena Pavlova Swimming From Ukraine To New York
*Stage 2: Paige Christie Overcomes Conditions At 8 Bridges

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Why Jordan Wilimovsky Will Win 10K In Rio Olympic Games

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

It is nearly impossible to accurately predict the medalists in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games...but some athletes are ideally prepared to swim the race of their lives and capture gold.

One of those athletes is reigning world 10 km champion who blew away his competition in Kazan, American Jordan Wilimovsky.

There are a number of reasons why Wilimovsky will stand on top of the Olympic podium on Copacabana Beach at the end of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim:

1. His track record of success on the international stage. Not only did he dominate the competition at the last world championships, but he has long been a contender in every international competition he has ever participated in, including the FINA World Junior Open Water Swimming Championships.

2. His composure and inner drive. Despite the pressure of the Olympic Games, he has a mellow personality that experience with the logistics and expectations of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim.

3. He can adapt to all racing situations. Wilimovsky is never out of contention in any race. He has won races by surging with others or initiating surges himself from the front, from the middle of the lead pack. 4. He can come out on top in any all-out drop-dead sprint against his top competitors - from 50 meters out or 500 meters out.

4. He has succeeded in medaling in lakes and seas, and in rough and calm conditions.

5. The water temperature, either cold or warm, will not bother him. He is comfortable in all weather, wind and water conditions.

6. He is comfortable in the surf and waves as a long-time surfer. He understands the dynamics of the ocean which will be extremely important if Copacabana Beach is wavy and turbulent.

7. The 22-year-old believes he can medal and win.

8. The power, resources and logistical operations of USA Swimming is behind him, many of his daily cares are taken care of by staff members.

9. His coach, Dave Kelsheimer, is a strategic thinker and will put together an excellent Plan A and alternative Plan B and Plan C in his signature event.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Why Haley Anderson Will Win 10K In Rio Olympic Games

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

It is nearly impossible to accurately predict the medalists in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games...but some athletes are ideally prepared to swim the race of their lives and capture gold.

One of those athletes is a two-time Olympic veteran who came within 0.4 seconds of winning an Olympic gold medal in London, American Haley Anderson.

There are a number of reasons why Anderson will stand on top of the Olympic podium on Copacabana Beach at the end of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim:

1. Her track record of success on the international stage. Not only has she won two 5 km world championships, but she has long been a contender in every international competition she has ever participated in.

2. Her Olympic experience. Anderson is hungry for a gold medal. She knows the pressure of the Games, she has experience with the logistics and expectations of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim.

3. She can adapt to all racing situations. Anderson has won races from the front, from the middle of the lead pack, and in an all-out drop-dead sprint against all her top competitors at least once.

4. She has succeeded in medaling in lakes and seas, manmade and natural, and in rough and calm conditions.

5. The water temperature, either cold or warm, will not bother her. She is comfortable in all weather, wind and water conditions.

6. She can sprint with the best in the world. She found her initial domestic success in the 500-yard freestyle, but her quickness from any distance from the finish (5 meters, 50 meters, 500 meters) is world-class.

7. The 24-year-old believes she can medal and win.

8. The power, resources and logistical operations of USA Swimming is behind her with many of her daily cares are taken care of by staff members.

9. Her coach, Catherine Vogt, helps keep her cool, calm, and composed throughout the Olympic Games, leading up to her signature event.



Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

It Takes A Village To Do A Three-Way Crossing

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Robert Palmese completed a solo crossing of the Catalina Channel in 12 hours 21 minutes 2015.

At the annual banquet among his Catalina Channel peers, he announced his attempt at an unprecedented three-way crossing on August 11th 2016.

A student at San Diego Mesa College, he has his coaches Nathan Resch and Jim Fegan helping him as well as his La Jolla Cove training partners Dan Simonelli and Susanne Simpson. They - and a large escort crew and other members of the La Jolla Cove Swim Club - are all part of his journey and attempt.

In addition, he is continuing to raise money for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation [see here]. His first Catalina Channel crossing was a charity swim for Emily Nichols who had passed away. His triple crossing will be a culmination of his journey.

He estimates the 60.6-mile (97.5 km) crossing will take him between 32-36 hours, an overall pace that is faster than his solo crossing in 2015.



















Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Why Spyridon Gianniotis Will Win Rio Olympics 10K

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

It is nearly impossible to accurately predict the medalists in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games...but some athletes are ideally prepared to swim the race of their lives and capture a medal.

One of those athletes is the senior veteran of the Greek Swimming Federation, Spyridon Gianniotis.

There are a number of reasons why Gianniotis will stand on the Olympic podium on Copacabana Beach at the end of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim:

1. His track record of success on the international stage. Not only has he won two FINA World Championships in the 10 km marathon swim, but he has long been a contender in every international competition he has participated in.

2. His Olympic experience. Gianniotis has qualified for the 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games. He knows the pressure of the Games, he has experience with the logistics and expectations of the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim.

3. He can adapt to all racing situations. Gianniotis has won races from the front, from the middle of the lead pack, and from way back in the rear (one of his FINA World Championship victories can after he came back from 46th place).

4. He has succeeded in medaling in lakes and oceans, rowing basins and seas, and in rough and calm conditions.

5. This is realistically his last shot at a medal. The 36-year-old retains the stamina, strength and speed of men half his age and his race awareness is on the highest end of the spectrum.

5. He believes he can medal and win.

6. Greece is rooting for him.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The 1951 Daily Mail Race Across The English Channel

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The second edition of the Daily Mail race, was held in 1951.

After Hassan Abdel Rehim won the first edition in 1950, another Egyptian, 34-year-old Mareeh Hassan Hamad, won the race in 12 hours 12 minutes, just one minute over Frenchman Roger Le Morvan who placed second for the second consecutive year.

The results were as follows:

1. Mareeh Hassan Hamad (Egypt) 12:12
2. Roger Le Morvan (France) 12:13
3. Hassan Abdel Rehim (Egypt) - 12:25
4. Saied El Arabi (Egypt) 12:42
5. Brenda Fisher (England) 12:42 - First woman
6. Godfrey Chapman (England) 12:56
7. Winnie Roach (Canada) 13:25
8. Enriqueta Duarte (Argentina) 13:26
9. Lars Beril Warle (Sweden) 13:28
10. Raphael Morand (France) 13:45
11. Jenny James (Wales) 13:55
12. Jason Zirganos (Greece) 14:01
13. Jan Van Hemsbergen (Netherlands) 14:03
14. Sally Bauer (Sweden) 14:04
15. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina) 14:14
16. William E. (Ned) Barnie (Scotland) 15:01
17. Jenny Kammersgaard (Denmark) 15:38
18. Daniel Carpio (Peru) 23:05

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, June 25, 2016

The 1950 Daily Mail Race Across The English Channel

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The first Daily Mail race across the English Channel was held in 1950. Limited to 20 participants and sponsored by the London Daily Mail, Hassan Abdel Rehim, a 41-year-old Egyptian, won the race in a then-record time of 10 hours 50 minutes over the international field.

The results were as follows:

1. Hassan Abdel Rehim (Egypt) - 10:50
2. Roger Le Morvan (France) 11:02
3. Mareeh Hassan Hamad (Egypt) 12:10
4. Sam Rockett (Great Britain) 14:17
5. William Barnie (Scotland) 14:50
6. Eileen Fenton (Great Britain) 15:31 - First woman
7. Jason Zirganos (Greece) 16:19
8. Antonio Abertondo (Argentina) 16:25
9. Jenny Kammersgaard (Denmark) 16:30
DNF Emile Soron (France)
DNF Eduard Mussche (Belgium)
DNF David Frank (USA)
DNF Willy Van Rysel (Holland)
DNF G.B. Brewster (Great Britain)
DNF Panagiotis Kamberous (Greece)
DNF Elna Andersen (Denmark)
DNF Margaret Ann Feather
DNF Fahmmy Attallah (Egypt)

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Can Dana Vollmer Continue Her Olympic Run?

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Dana Vollmer aims to make her third Olympic team at the upcoming U.S. Olympic Swim Trials in Omaha, Nebraska this coming week. She discusses her lifestyle, training regimen and preparations in a press conference above.

At the 2004 Athens Olympic Games, the University of California Berkeley swimmer won a gold medal as a member of the winning United States team in the 800m freestyle relay that set the world record in the event. Although she missed the 2008 Olympics, she came back strongly at the 2012 London Olympics. Vollmer set the world record on her way to the gold medal in the 100m butterfly and won gold medals in the 400m medley relay and the 800m freestyle relay.

But at her fifth career Olympic Trials in Omaha, Vollmer comes to the qualification meet as a young mother.

When she missed out at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the disappointment was crushing.

But she accepted an all-expense trip to compete in the 2008 Fiji Swims and participated in the 18 km relay. She cruised, she smiled, she enjoyed the beautiful tropical waters and got her batteries re-juiced in Fiji.

She experienced, as Dr. Wallace J. Nichols describes, the BLUEMiND.

Her connection with the ocean was immediate and profound: she loved the smell of the tropical air, the sound of the sea breeze and the feel of the sand between her toes; she returned home refreshed.

"We just felt like we needed to get her out of the United States and, for lack of a better way of putting it, her own pity party," recalled coach Teri McKeever of Vollmer's trip to Fiji.

"When she got to Fiji, she seemed a bit distant, but she came out of her first leg on our relay with the biggest smile in the world," said relay teammate Steven Munatones. "Then every subsequent leg, she became more and more radiant. By the time we landed on Beachcomber Island, she seemed to put her disappointments in a distant past."

"It was such an honor to swim with her and [Olympic silver medalist] Alison Wagner," said Bill Ireland, another teammate on the 18 km relay. "When you are on a boat in a tropical paradise, you can't help but have a great time. She was so relaxed and just so magnificent to watch in that marine paradise."

"I got to do an open water race for the first time, and it just really made me realize that I loved being in the water, and I loved swimming, and I had a blast doing that open-water swim," Vollmer told the media. "It made me realize that [the biggest issues were] the injuries and the training and the pressure that I was putting on myself mentally. I look back to 2008 and I wasn't excited to race and compete. I was more worried about what happened if I failed, and who did I let down, and how that would look for Teri and my hometown. I crumbled under that. I couldn't take that all on."

But those pressures and disappointments were put behind her when she returned home. The result?

Vollmer had a breakout year in 2009 and has continued to be on a roll. She soon set her first American record and won 2 medals at the world championships. She continued her streak in 2011 at the World Swimming Championships when she won 2 gold medals and a silver, and her career hit its peak at the 2012 London Olympics.

With her Olympic victories and world record that completed her comeback, her wide smile returned as she regained sight of her goals.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Charlotte Samuels Pens Earth & String

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Charlotte Samuels, the youngest person to complete the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming, released her first book of poetry entitled Earth & String.

Like her role model Lynne Cox, Samuels combines writing with her ocean swimming career. “I love writing because I love language. I love the endless routes one can take as a writer and how one can bounce back to the words at any point in his or her life. I think that swimming has made me more aware. Through swimming, I found writing."

The incoming freshmen at Smith College is as relentless on dryland as she is in the water. She volunteers for Citizens For Swimming, Swim Free, Swim Across America and Ridgewood YMCA while giving motivational speeches with the YWCA and the Girl Scouts.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Open Water Coverage In Need Is Coverage Indeed

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

The best practices of the best ocean swimming coaches are difficult for newcomers to understand, but easy for an experienced veteran to appreciate.

We asked lifeguard and waterman Bruckner Chase of the Ocean City Swim Club how he designs his practices and safety net during his open ocean workouts on the South Jersey shore along the Eastern Seaboard.

"We run our 1-hour sessions around a 350-meter triangular course set up just beyond the shore break which can be 50 - 100 meters out from shore. Coverage is performed by 2 to 3 paid lifeguards on paddleboards in the triangle with one lifeguard positioned at the entrance/exit point.

We have another 1 or 2 guards stationed in waist-deep water with rescue cans for what we call “Fish Out” assists. All are professional and certified ocean lifeguards.


Chase serves as the final set of eyes on the swimmers as he is positioned on the beach with his wife and an assistant handling check in and out of the water to cover the usual 40 to 70 swimmers.

"The board versus shore break coverage numbers get adjusted based on the conditions. And we swim in front of the Longport Beach Patrol Headquarters where I have worked training their rookies and veterans over the years."

Coverage indeed.

Copyright © 2016 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
LEARN MORE

The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

SponsorMySwim.com

Open Water Swimming Event Sanctioning

World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program