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Monday, February 19, 2018

Flying Dutchman Honored With Dale Petranech Award

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Herman Willemse was selected as the second recipient of the Dale Petranech Award for Services to the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame.

The Flying Dutchman, as he was known at his peak, will be presented with the honor and award at the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame Induction/Award ceremony in Old Windsor in the United Kingdom on March 31st.

In addition to his numerous victories on the professional marathon swimming circuit, he served admirably well and long as the President of the World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation during the 1960s.

Ned Denison, Chairman of the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, explains the reasoning behind his selection. "He assisted the ground work to establish the IMSHOF in 1967. When classes were named starting in 1963, Herman was included in the first class. He is ranked as one of the most dominant swimmers of his generation.

His victories included:
• 30 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Canada in 10 hours 7 minutes in 1961, in 9 hours 3 minutes in 1962 and in 8 hours 32 minutes in 1963
• 36 km Around-the-Island Marathon Swim in Atlantic City, USA five times from 1960 to 1964
• 24 km Canadian National Exhibition race in 1961 and 1962
• 12.5 km Northumberland Strait race in 1964
• 37 km la Descente ou remontée du Saguenay in 6 hours 15 minutes in 1966
• 16 km Tois Riviere Swims in 1961 to 1963 in Canada
• 45 km Mar del Plato race in Argentina
• 42 km race in the Suez Canal in Egypt
• 88 km Maratón Internacional Hernandarias – Parana in Argentina
• 32 km Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli in Italy
• 13-time Dutch national championships
• 58 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina victory in 1963 with two 3rd-place finishes in 1964 and 1966
• Second at the 1959 Billy Butlin Cross Channel International Swim in 12 hours 49 minutes [shown above on right with goggles on]
• World male champion of the World Professional Marathon Swimmers Federation in 1963 and second to Egypt's Abou-Heif for the next three consecutive years

Upon his retirement as a marathon swimmer, he coached Johannes Schans for two years culminating in his becoming the male champion of the World Professional Marathon Swimmers Federation in 1963.

This award was created in 2016 to honor Dale Petranech for decades of service to the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame. Petranech is a dual inductee in both the IMSHOF and the International Swimming Hall of Fame as an Honor Contributor. As a marathon swimmer, Petranech previously held the record as the oldest solo swimmer across the Catalina Channel and has serve for nearly 50 years in various capacities at all levels of the sport, local, regional, national and international.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Damián Blaum Successfully Crosses Río de La Plata



Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Damián Blaum successfully crossed the Río de La Plata, 42.2 km from Colonia Del Sacramento in Uruguay to Punta Lara in Argentina in 9 hours 6 minutes on his second attempt.

It was the second try by the 36-year-old Argentine 2008 Olympic swimmer who previously had to stop his first attempt at 21.1 km 4 hours 5 minutes after he started when government authorities determined his requisite documentation was not in order.

His swim was sanctioned by the Asociación Cruce a Nado Río de la Plata (ACNRP), the governing body that organizes and ratifies crossings of the Río de la Plata, known as the widest river in the world.

For video clips from Blaum's crossing, visit here.

For more information on the Asociación Cruce a Nado Río de la Plata, visit here on Facebook.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

10 Creatures To Watch For In The Open Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Lewis Pugh explains what he has to do when swimming above the Arctic Circle and along the frozen coastline. "We throw rocks into the water near the shore. Leopard seals hide under the ice shelf waiting for their prey to jump into the water, so we can see if the leopard seals come out. If the seals are there, I do not get in." Swimmers have a variety of ways and means to protect themselves against creatures that strike the most fear in the world's oceans including sharks, box jellyfish, hippopotami, and crocodiles.

The top 10 most potentially dangerous creatures in the open water for swimmers are below:

1. Polar Bear
Found in the Arctic. They look cute, but they are extremely dangerous. They are one of the few animal species that will hunt a human. They do not fear man and can move very quickly.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat, and move quickly to safety.

2. Nile Crocodile
Found in many rivers and lakes in Africa. They are patient. They wait. They are ambush predators. It is difficult to see them - because most rivers and lakes are murky. Not many people survive a crocodile attack.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat, and move quickly to safety.

3. Hippopotamus
They kill more people in Africa than any other animal, other than the mosquito (malaria). A bite from a hippo is a serious wound.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat, and move quickly to safety.

4. Leopard seal
They are frightening looking animals with razor sharp teeth found off the Antarctic continent. They bark a blood curdling hiss when swimmers get near. One moment they will kill a penguin and drop it in front of a swimmer as a gift. The next moment they are trying to bite human legs.

Countermeasure: If in the water, immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat, and move quickly to safety.

5. Great White Shark
A well-known apex predator found in most oceans is very dangerous, but a surprising number of people survive great white attacks.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat and move quickly to safety.

6. Box Jellyfish
Some species are among the most venomous creatures in the world and are found off the Australian coast, but they are invading other waters around the world. A sting can be fatal.

Countermeasure: Almost impossible to avoid in certain times of the month just before sunset and in the night. Upon being stung, get immediate help.

7. Orcas or killer whales
They can handle themselves well against the Great White Shark. Enough said.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat and move quickly to safety.

8. Sea snakes
Air-breathing aquatic snakes have some of the most potent venom of all snakes. Some have gentle dispositions and bite only when provoked, but others are much more aggressive and teeth may remain in the wound.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat and move quickly to safety.

9. Needlefish
These slender fish have long, narrow jaws filled with multiple sharp teeth and can jump out of the water at high speeds over the decks of shallow boats, especially when attracted by light at night.

Countermeasure: Immediately get out of the water, into an escort boat and move quickly to safety. Do not wear anything that illuminates or reflects light (even moonlight).

10. Piranha
Known for their sharp teeth and a voracious appetite for meat, the total number of piranha species is unknown with estimates ranging from fewer than 30 to more than 60.

Countermeasure: Follow the steps used by Martin Strel during his Amazon River stage swim [story to follow].

There are other predators and creatures for open water swimmers to be cautious of, including homo sapiens, however, humans are visitors to the marine world where its natural denizens must be respected and protected.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Doctor Is In The English Channel

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

In 1972, a young 15-year-old Lynne Cox set a record swimming across the English Channel from England to France in a time of 9 hours 57 minutes, breaking both the men's and women's records.

Her crossing was a blistering fast time during that era and the first time anyone had broken the 10-hour mark swimming from England to France.

That summer of 1972, Richard Davis Hart, a studious young man who received his Ph.D. from Springfield College and was serving in the United States army as a second lieutenant, was training hard for his own attempt.

While he had been ranked third in the World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation and was an NCAA Division II All American swimmer, it was his first channel attempt. And he made the most of his time spent in the water, setting a record of 9 hours 44 minutes.

After setting the English Channel record, he decided to go to medical school in 1973 and graduated in 1977. During one of his summers while studying to become a urologist, he swam across the English Channel again in 1976 with another fast time of 9 hours 50 minutes.

In Body Trauma: A Writer's Guide to Wounds and Injuries, published in 2006, Dr. David Page writes, "Folklore has it that long-distance swimmers are hefty athletes who sport a generous lawyer of adipose (fat) tissue to fight off the ravages of cold water. Without a doubt, some swimmers are cherubs, adiposidly unchallenged. The real speedsters are svelte, and they don't use a layer of grease, either.

In 1972, I was Davis Hart's physician when he set a world record swimming the English Channel. There was't much information in the medical literature at that time to use to prepare Davis for this endeavor, but we knew Davis's trim physique would leave him at risk for cold-related problems. Water conducts heat twenty-five times faster than air. Davis discovered a training program that worked for him. He swam in cold water as often as possible, but he also did a lot of warm pool swimming because of his job. What to do to acclimate to cold water? Davis began to stand in a frigid shower in a plastic garbage can filled with the cold shower water, training his nervous system to acclimate to the harsh elements of mimicked cold water submersion.

It worked. Davis tolerated 62 Channel water for nine hours and forty-four minutes
."

Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1946, Dr. Hart is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a shining example of seriously-minded hard work and success.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Back Now And Now At Buzzards Bay Swim

Courtesy of Deborah Hood, Buzzards Bay Swim, New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Gerry Payette was always swimming at local beaches around New Bedford, Massachusetts in his youth. He will receive the Pukwudgie Award* for participating in his 20th Buzzards Bay Swim in his home state.

Buzzards Bay Swim is having its 25th anniversary charity event in the Outer Harbor of New Bedford. Started in 1993, the 1.2-mile charity swim raises funds to support the Buzzards Bay Coalition's work to protect and restore Buzzard's Bay.

Payette talked about his participation. “Although I’m a very slow swimmer, I take great pride in fulfilling the need to participate to help the Coalition continue with the important task to save the Bay. Swimmers are given ample support. Enjoying the Swim — living in the moment — is truly what I believe. And helping out a great cause — it’s a win-win situation.

Payette will be joined by other veterans of the event: Peter Burlinson and Rhea Teves-Cate.

Burlinson first participated in the event 1997 when only 49 swimmers took part. Peter describes the swim "as a fun way to demonstrate and celebrate what has been accomplished in reducing pollution flowing into the Bay. The swim is an event that increases awareness, adds support, and builds sustaining membership so the Coalition’s necessary work will continue.”

Teves-Cate completed her first swim in 1999 at the age of 62. Over the next 10 years, she swam across New Bedford Harbor and was the event's top fundraiser award four years in a row by recruiting donations from more than 100 people. “My original focus was just to be able to swim the 1.2 miles from Davy’s Locker to Fort Phoenix. As I became more knowledgeable about [the Coalition’s] purpose, I became more interested in the reason for the event which is to raise funds to support clean water for swimmers, fishermen, shore wildlife, coastal residents, and boaters.”

Now she is 86 years old and does not swim in the event, but she instead serves as a volunteer at the food tent at the finish, welcoming swimmers to celebrate their accomplishment.

For more information on the June 30th event, visit here.

* In addition to the Pukwudgie Award, the Cuttyhunk Award and the Six Mile Award are given to repeat swimmers.

Gerry Payette is shown in the top photo; Peter Burlinson is shown in the middle photo; Rhea Teves-Cate is shown in the lower photo...back when they first started participating in the Buzzards Bay Swim and their most recent swim.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Some Swimmers View This As Cool...Not Cold

Courtesy of Christof Wandratsch, Skelllefteå, Sweden.

Skelllefteå is a city in Västerbotten County, Sweden that is site of the 4th stage of the International Winter Swimming Association's Winter Swimming World Cup where the air temperature is currently -17°C and the water temperature is 0°C.

"[How] cool," reports Germany's Christof Wandratsch.

How do the winter swimmers warm-up for this kind of event?!?

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thinking Out Loud About Paddles, Buoys In The Open Water

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Decades ago, Greta Andersen used to train for her professional marathon swims and solo swims across the English Channel, Catalina Channel and Molokai Channel in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Long Beach, California.

She used to pull and kick massively long ocean workouts, sometimes escorted by paddlers, sometimes swimming solo.

Since many of our male masters swimming teammates love putting on hand paddles and wearing a pull buoy to rip off a fast pool swimming set, we wondered how cool would it be to have an open water race that allowed hand paddles and pull buoys?

While racing with hand paddles and pull buoys in an ocean would be interesting, it might even be more entertaining to have a race in a flat-water venue.

If some open water races allow wetsuits and others have fin divisions or offer breaststroke heats, why not hand paddles and pull buoys?

Just for fun.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Damián Blaum En Route To Cross Río de la Plata

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

Lucas Rivet is an open water swimmer from Argentina who manages the Asociación Cruce a Nado Río de la Plata (ACNRP), the governing body to organize and ratify solo swims across the Río de la Plata bordered by the Uruguay River in Uruguay and the Paraná River in Argentina.

The funnel-shaped estuary that part of the border between Argentina and Uruguay serves as on the southeastern coastline of South America is 290 km (180 miles) long, but its width varies between 2 km) at the inner sections to 220 km at its mouth.

Today, Rivet is helping Damián Blaum in his second attempt to cross the Río de la Plata. Follow Blaum's crossing attempt between Colonia Del Sacramento in Uruguay and Punta Lara in Argentina here.

Blaum's first attempt on February 14the ended after he crossed the Uruguayan part of the river at the 21.1 km point after in 4 hours 5 minutes due to logistical problems.

For more information on Blaum's crossing live, visit here.

For more information on the Asociación Cruce a Nado Río de la Plata, visit here on Facebook.



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Friday, February 16, 2018

Swimming's Growth In China

Courtesy of FINA.

The growth of everything from pool swimming to ice swimming in China has been massive and is projected to be even larger.

The projected value of the aquatics industry in China by 2020 is US$30,000,000,000. There are an estimated 1,000 new aquatics clubs that the Chinese government aims to develop by 2020.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Beautiful Awards From Nevis To St. Kitts

Courtesy of Nevis to St. Kitts Cross-Channel Swim, Caribbean Sea.

The sea turtle awards for the Nevis to St. Kitts Cross-Channel Swim or the Bente Weber Memorial Swim, a 2.5-mile (4 km) inter-island Caribbean Sea swim across the Narrows from Nevis to St. Kitts, are unusual and beautiful.

2017 Top 10 Results:
1. Ashley Whitney (36) 55:28
2. Gregory White (49) 55:49
3. Keri-Anne Payne (29) 56:17
4. Kevin Pollman (36) 57:16
5. Rick Schumacher (53) 59:29
6. Diego López (35) 1:00:33
7. Erik Spit (30) 1:01:56
8. Tom Gean (54) 1:02:23
9. Eney Jones (56) 1:02:49
10. John Massiah (35) 1:05:34

The memorial swim is a tribute to the legacy of Bente Weber.

Winston Crooke, President of the St. Kitts and Nevis Triathlon, explains who the wonderful, selfless person Bente was and namesake of the race for the 17th time. "Bente and Gerd Weber, who both had a huge impact on the development of our young Cycle and Triathlon Club in Nevis, started visiting Nevis for their winters. Gerd was a competitive masters swimmer and taught us all how to swim properly and better, myself included. Meanwhile, Bente took over most of our club administration and timed our events.

They were visitors to Nevis over a period of 5 years staying here for 4 months a year. Under their guidance, we were able to make the transfer to become fully fledged triathletes and our swimming improved immensely. Unfortunately we lost Bente to cancer so I decided to host an event in her memory each year. It started as just a group of friends and visitors and has grown each year since. We still miss her energy, enthusiasm and overall good-naturedness
."



Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Marine Layer Off The California Coast

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

As you drive down the California coast, you can often hit a marine layer as you near the shoreline.

The marine layer often hovers over the coastal areas and lifts when the sun rises and the temperatures rise.

In the case of coastal California, the offshore marine layer can also contains fog. The fog lingers until the heat of the sun becomes strong enough to evaporate it, often lasting into the afternoon during the May gray, June gloom, No-sky July or Fogust periods.

It is no wonder that California lifeguards often wear jackets during the summer month which seems so out of character. Why?

The California beaches can get quite chilly in the summer with its frequent marine layers descending upon the coastline in the early morning hours until nearly the early afternoon.

The marine layer clouds that impact California are low-altitude stratus clouds that form over the adjacent ocean waters.

The formation of these clouds usually begins when wind over the water surface mixes moist surface air upwards. As this air moves up, it expands and cools. The cooling causes the relative humidity to increase and once the relative humidity reaches 100%, condensation of water vapor into liquid water drops takes place and clouds begin form.

In some beaches, the marine layer lingers for hours as the beach-goers from inland desert areas flock to the beaches and are pleasantly surprised to enjoy a significantly cooler climate.

"Also, it can get windy up in the lifeguard tower too. Even when it's calm on the sand it's much cooler and more windy up in the tower," said former lifeguard Lexie Kelly shown above.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swimming Across The Catalina Channel

Courtesy of Catalina Channel Swimming Federation with Santa Catalina Island in the horizon off the coast of Southern California.

Start near midnight and finish in the early, mid or late morning...or later across the Catalina Channel.

2017 Successful Catalina Channel Swimmers:
1. Antonio Argüelles, Mexico on January 15th, 14 hours 27 minutes 34 seconds
2. Liz Uribe, USA on June 4th, 10 hours 42 minutes 5 seconds
3. Jesus Samuel Neri Gutierrez, Mexico on June 16th, 14 hours 40 minutes 43 seconds
4. Nathalie Pohl, Germany on June 19th, 9 hours 9 minutes 35 seconds
5. Victoria RV Cox, United Kingdom on July 6th, 15 hours 39 minutes 46 seconds
6. Paul Patrick Feltoe, Australia on July 11th, 10 hours 21 minutes 42 seconds
7. Julie Isbill, Australia on July 11th, 10 hours 43 minutes 15 seconds
8. Benjamin Freeman, Australia on July 13th, 8 hours 47 minutes 42 seconds
9. Matthew Adam Schubert, USA on July 13th, 15 hours 33 minutes 41 seconds
10. Carol Cashell, Ireland on July 14th, 10 hours 28 minutes 53 seconds
11. Andre Wiersig, Germany on July 20th, 9 hours 48 minutes 23 seconds
12. Michael John Teys, Australia on July 20th, 11 hours 18 minutes 20 seconds
13. James A. Loreto Jr., USA on July 25th, 11 hours 47 minutes 46 seconds
14. Martyn Paul Webster, United Kingdom on July 28th, 10 hours 57 minutes 3 seconds
15. Ragip Vural Tandogan, Turkey on July 28th, 13 hours 1 minutes 38 seconds
16. Kamil Resa Alsaran, Turkey on July 28th, 13 hours 1 minutes 38 seconds
17. Emre Erdogan, Turkey on July 30th, 9 hours 50 minutes 44 seconds
18. Dina Levačić, Croatia on August 3rd, 9 hours 47 minutes 53 seconds
19. Karina Yazmin Hernandez, Mexico on August 9th, 11 hours 47 minutes 47 seconds
20. Nathan Payas, Gibraltar on August 11th, 9 hours 34 minutes 51 seconds
21. Oliver Richard Wilkinson, Australia on August 14th, 9 hours 12 minutes 9 seconds
22. John G. Hughes Jr., USA on August 15th, 13 hours 14 minutes 2 seconds
23. Heloise Leblanc, USA on August 16th, 12 hours 37 minutes 6 seconds
24. Mia Thomas (daughter of Michella Thomas), USA on August 16th, 12 hours 37 minutes 6 seconds
25. Julie Newton, USA on August 17th, 13 hours 35 minutes 12 seconds
26. Bradley Lundblad, USA on August 18th, 13 hours 45 minutes 23 seconds
27. Shane Moraghan, Ireland on August 21st, 9 hours 14 minutes 41 seconds
28. Rene Martinez Saenz, Mexico on August 29th, 14 hours 26 minutes 36 seconds
29. Luiz Pradines de Menezes Jr., Brazil on August 29th, 18 hours 55 minutes 25 seconds
30. Jaime Lomelin Galvadon, Mexico on September 2nd, 11 hours 53 minutes 44 seconds
31. Luca Estrada Pozzi, Italy on September 4th, 10 hours 32 minutes 55 seconds
32. Erin Kathleen O’Leary, USA on September 5th, 16 hours 44 minutes 0 seconds
33. Philip Yorke, United Kingdom [breaststroke] on September 8th, 15 hours 52 minutes 24 seconds
34. Maureen Mech Montgomery, USA on September 14th, 11 hours 30 minutes 53 seconds
35. Dr. Paul D. Hornyak, USA on September 14th, 13 hours 13 minutes 50 seconds
36. Serbo C. Simeoni, USA on September 15th, 10 hours 12 minutes 58 seconds
37. Maev Kerri Fitzpatrick, Australia on September 19th, 13 hours 2 minutes 6 seconds
38. Ken Mignosa, USA on September 21th, 17 hours 18 minutes 31 seconds
39. Andrew J. Wynn, USA on September 23rd, 11 hours 21 minutes 43 seconds
40. Ryan Utsumi, USA on September 25th, 11 hours 6 minutes 33 seconds
41. Katherine Batts, United Kingdom on September 26th, 18 hours 28 minutes 8 seconds
42. Izebel Sierra Arenas, Mexico on September 27th, 12 hours 15 minutes 31 seconds
43. Lynton Charles Mortensen, Australia on September 27th, 13 hours 59 minutes 28 seconds
44. Kate Robarts, United Kingdom on September 28th, 16 hours 3 minutes 47 seconds
45. Andrew B. McLaughlin, USA on October 5th, 12 hours 9 minutes 58 seconds
46. Courtney Moates Paulk, USA on October 11th (MCM), 12 hours 28 minutes on her first leg, 33 hours 13 minutes total cumulative time on her two-way crossing
47. Teet Daniel, Estonia on October 18th, 12 hours 16 minutes 29 seconds
48. David Holscher, USA on October 18th, 12 hours 31 minutes 22 seconds
49. Jenny Smith, USA on October 24th, 10 hours 45 minutes 37 seconds
50. Hank Wise, USA on October 27th 10 hours 14 minutes 0 seconds
51. Carlos Acosta, Mexico on October 30th, 11 hours 22 minutes 9 seconds
52. Hank Wise, USA on November 11th, 10 hours 1 minutes 52 seconds

For more information, visit the Catalina Channel Swimming Federation website here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Swimming At The Edge Of Extreme

Courtesy of Kate Steels-Fryatt, Snowdonia, north Wales.

11 people [see below] in history have completed an Ice Zero Mile (1.6 km open water swim in water temperature below 1°C).

Among those 11 intrepid aquatic adventurers, Ram Barkai has done 11 total Ice Miles over the course of his career. "I believe that every single person out there has a superhuman or hero hiding inside him or her and it is entirely up to that person to unlock that superhuman, ignore what everyone and society told us about what we can’t do and shouldn’t do and let it thrive with humility and respect to others.

The Ice is calling. Never be scared to dare
."

Kate Steels-Fryatt, a relatively recent force in the ice swimming community, travels the world challenging herself. "I am lucky enough to have travelled, and taken part in ice swims in many wonderful places. One particularly memorable trip was in March 2017 when I was lucky enough to be part of a swimming expedition to Arctic Norway. The fjord scenery was stunning, the sea crystal clear and icy cold. I successfully completed my Polar Ice Mile here."

1. Ram Barkai (South Africa) 11 miles with 0.0°C as lowest water temperature
2. Ger Kennedy (Ireland) 8 miles with 0.5°C as lowest water temperature
3. Jaimie Monahan (USA) 7 miles with -0.03°C as lowest water temperature
4. Kate Steels-Fryatt (England) 5 miles with 0.9°C as lowest water temperature
5. Ryan Stramrood (South Africa) 5 miles with -1.0°C as lowest water temperature
6. Kieron Palframan (South Africa) 4 miles with 0.0°C as lowest water temperature
7. Toks Viviers (South Africa) 3 miles with 0.5°C as lowest water temperature
8. Henri Kaarma (Estonia) 3 miles with 0.0°C as lowest water temperature
9. Aleksandr Brylin (Russia) 2 miles with 0.3°C as lowest water temperature
10. Andrey Sychyovv (Russia) 1 mile with 0.3°C as lowest water temperature
11. Gavin Pike (South Africa) 1 mile with 0.5°C as lowest water temperature

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swim Camp Catalina, Swim Camp Mexico

Courtesy of Scott Zornig, Swim Camp Catalina, Santa Catalina Island, California.

Scott Zornig is organizing his 5th edition of Swim Camp Catalina and hosting his second Swim Camp Mexico.

Swim Camp Catalina V will be held October 25th-28th in Avalon on the southeast side of Catalina Island. In addition to the blue waters of the Pacific Ocean, campers will enjoy a waterfront dominated by restaurants, pubs, wineries, boutique hotels and quaint shops. The Seaport Village Inn with its ocean-view rooms is close to the water's edge, provides free continental breakfast and has a Jacuzzi to reheat in after the training swims.

The cost is US$449 per person* that includes 3 nights lodging, 3 dinners, breakfast, camp giveaways, round-trip boat travel on the Catalina Express and insurance. The camp is limited to 63 spots.

* Fees are US$449 until May 31st, US$499 June 1st - July 31st, US$549 after August 1st.

For more information, www.swimcamp.us.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

The Life And Legacy Of Marjory Stoneman Douglas

Courtesy of Wikipedia, Everglades, Florida.

A school shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida resulted in the death of 17 people. The tragedy resulted in the usual condemnations from politicians, parents and authorities - and shock from students - from yet another school shooting in America.

The sad tragedy is not the subject of this article.

But the namesake of this high school was a remarkable woman with a remarkable legacy.

Marjory Stoneman Douglas (1890 – 1998) was an American environmentalist known for her staunch defense of the Everglades in southern Florida against efforts to drain it and reclaim land for development.

The Wellesley College graduate moved to Miami to work for The Miami Herald where she became a freelance writer.

Her most influential work was the book The Everglades: River of Grass (1947), which redefined the popular conception of the Everglades as a treasured river instead of a worthless swamp.

The Everglades was not her only focus and interest. Douglas was outspoken and politically conscious of the women's suffrage and civil rights movements. She was called upon to take a central role in the protection of the Everglades when she was 79 years old. For the remaining 29 years of her life she worked relentlessly for the natural preservation and restoration of the nature of South Florida.

Her tireless efforts earned her several variations of the nickname "Grande Dame of the Everglades" as well as the hostility of agricultural and business interests looking to benefit from land development in Florida. Numerous awards were given to her, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom and she was inducted into several halls of fame.

Douglas lived to 108, working until nearly the end of her life for Everglades restoration. Upon her death, an obituary in The Independent in London stated, "In the history of the American environmental movement, there have been few more remarkable figures than Marjory Stoneman Douglas."

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection named its headquarters in Tallahassee after her in 1980, but she told a friend she would have rather seen the Everglades restored than her name on a building. During her polite acceptance speech, she criticized Ronald Reagan and the then-Secretary of the Interior James Watt for their lackluster approach to environmental conservation.

The National Parks Conservation Association established the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Award in 1986, that honor(s) individuals who often must go to great lengths to advocate and fight for the protection of the National Park System.

Despite blindness and diminished hearing, Douglas continued to be active into her second century, and was honored with a visit from Queen Elizabeth II, to whom Douglas gave a signed copy of The Everglades: River of Grass in 1991. Instead of gifts and celebrations, Douglas asked that trees be planted on her birthday, resulting in over 100,000 planted trees across the state and a bald cypress on the lawn of the governor's mansion. The South Florida Water Management District began removing exotic plants that had taken hold in the Everglades when Douglas turned 102.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor given to a civilian in the United States. The citation for the medal read, "Marjory Stoneman Douglas personifies passionate commitment. Her crusade to preserve and restore the Everglades has enhanced our Nation's respect for our precious environment, reminding all of us of nature's delicate balance. Grateful Americans honor the 'Grandmother of the Glades' by following her splendid example in safeguarding America's beauty and splendor for generations to come."

Douglas was inducted into the National Wildlife Federation Hall of Fame in 1999, and the National Women's Hall of Fame in 2000.

Innovative Engineering In The Ocean

Courtesy of Science Daily, University of California Santa Cruz, California.

Researchers at the University of California Santa Cruz and the Nature Conservancy have measured the protective role of coral reefs and field-tested a solution that reduces coastal risks by combining innovative engineering with restoration ecology.

Read the interesting findings here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Open Water Development Coordinator Wanted


Courtesy of USA Swimming, Huntington Beach, California.

USA Swimming announced its recruitment of a full-time Open Water Development Coordinator located in its national headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

General Purpose/Philosophy:
The National Team Division works to support our best athletes and coaches in their pursuit of Olympic and international success. The Open Water Development Coordinator will support the Open Water Director in all aspects of the Open Water National Team.

Job Summary:
The Open Water Development Coordinator will be tasked with supporting the growth of open water swimming in the United States.

Essential Duties/Responsibilities:
Open Water Development Responsibilities
o Develop ways to grow the event of open water in both athlete participation and number of safe events throughout the country
o Oversee and develop methods of streamlining the open water sanction process by working with LSCs, Zone Representatives and local race directors.
o Track athlete participation and event growth
o Develop the following best practices for our membership:
• Proper methods in running safe open water workouts
• Event safety management
• Event sustainability and profitability
o Develop educational resources for athletes, coaches and officials
o Deliver presentations and webinars to open water coaches, athletes and officials
o Work with the race directors of Zone Championships and other large domestic events to help maximize event safety, efficiency and participation
o Assist local race directors in creating safe and effective competitions
o Create and manage certification levels for coaches
o Serve as the staff liaison to the Open Water Development Committee

National Team Responsibilities
o Assist with the logistical preparation of Open Water National Team events
o Travel to international competitions as needed
o Support and collaborate with all National Team Division staff

Qualifications:
o Minimum education: Bachelor's Degree
o Proficiency in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook)
o Knowledge and experience of open water swimming from either an athlete, coach, official or event management standpoint
o Familiarity and comfort with the use of kayaks, paddleboards, SUPs, etc.
o Willingness to travel, at times extended and on weekends
o Excellent interpersonal, written and verbal communication skills
o Proficiency at public speaking
o Outstanding organizational skills

For more information, visit here or at USA Swimming.

Tactics & Techniques of Elite Open Water Swimmers above was filmed at the 2010 USA Swimming National Open Water Swimming Championships in Marine Stadium, Long Beach, California.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Guinness World Records, Part Two Of Two

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

While his wife's two-way crossing of the English Channel was recently included in the Guinness World Records, Charlie Gravett has also been included in the same publication.

So the husband-and-wife pair are unique in the history of the open water swimming world.

Both open water swimming specialists and veterans are inductees in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame and holders of world records included in the Guinness World Records.

Sally Minty-Gravett MBE was included for her 36 hour 26 minute two-way crossing as the oldest scuccessful swimmer in history and was inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame as an Honour Swimmer in the Class of 2005.

Charlie was inducted in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame in the Class of 2016 and was included in the Guinness World Records for his participation in an unprecedented six-man relay completed in 1971 for a 72-mile (115.87 km) relay from Turkey to Cyprus. "Back in 1971, I was part of a relay squad from RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus who swam into the 1972 issue (on page 296) with an entry which simply stated, 'Turkey to Cyprus: A team of RAF (Royal Air Force) swimmers covered the 72 miles (115.87 km) from southern Turkey (Anima Bernie) to Cyprus (Kyrinia) in 2 1/2 days [actually 33 hours].

The squad was led by Flight Lieutenant Antony Smith of 26 Squadron RAF Regiment. The swim was escorted by an RAF Marine craft and piloted by Flight Lieutenant Doug Potter.

We had trained by swimming many, many solo trips between Akrotiri to Limmasol (6+ miles) plus many similar swims around Cyprus. One memorable trip was brought to a sudden halt when the bloke I was swimming with swam into an expired donkey which had escaped from a local abattoir. It's gums were drawn back in a hideous grin. We left it where was and swum on
."

Full report to come soon.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Swim Wild, A New Book From The Hudson Brothers







































Courtesy of Robbie Hudson, Jack Hudson and Calum Hudson from Swim Wild.

The artwork above was created by Robbie Hudson and is part of a series of illustrations from Swim Wild, a publication of Robbie, Jack and Calum Hudson.

For more information, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Kim Swims In Bozeman, Montana

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

San Francisco. Santa Barbara. International Ocean Film Festival. Waimea Ocean Film Festival. Rocky Mountain Women's Film Festival.

Now KIM SWIMS is scheduled to be shown at the Bozeman Film Celebration in Bozeman, Montana that is held June 7th-10th, a film festival dedicated exclusively to films by and about women.

For more information, visit #BZN2018 or bozemanfilmcelebration.com.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

Strongman Swimming, The Journey Of Ross Edgley


Courtesy of Red Bull TV on strongman swimming Ross Edgley.

Legacy Of Petar Stoychev Honored By Hall Of Fame

Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

If there is anyone who deserves to be recognized as an Honor Open Water Swimmer by the International Swimming Hall of Fame, it is Bulgaria's Petar Stoychev.

Stoychev has done everything in the sport: 4-time Olympic pool swimmer (400m + 1500m freestyle), Olympic 10K Marathon Swim finalist (6th in 2008 + 9th in 2012), coach, administrator with FINA and the Bulgaria federal government (as Minister of Sport), 2008 Olympic flag bearer, FINA Athletic Representative, FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee member, ice swimming world record holder, ice swimming world champion, 25 km world champion, multi-time FINA World Championship medalist, 11-time winner of the Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean, 11-time winner of the Traversee internationale du lac Memphremagog, English Channel record holder and 2-time finisher (7 hours 21 minutes in 2006 and 6 hours 57 minutes in 2007), 11-time FINA Open Water Swimming Grand Prix winner, 2009 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year, 60+ wins on the professional marathon swimming circuit, and swims from Manhattan Island to Robben Island.

Along with Honor Swimmers Rebecca Adlington (Great Britain), Amanda Beard (USA), Natalie Coughlin (USA) and Libby Trickett (Australia), Honor Water Polo Player Brenda Villa (USA), Honor Contributor Andy Burke (USA), Honor Diver Irina Lashko (USSR/Russia/Australia), Honor Coach Bill Sweetenham (Australia), Honor Synchronized Swimmer Miho Takeda (Japan), and Pioneer Synchronized Swimming Contributor Joy Cushman (USA), Stoychev will be inducted in the International Swimming Hall of Fame in the Class of 2018 as an Honor Open Water Swimmer in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the weekend of May 18th-20th.

Stoychev joins the following dual honorees in the International Swimming Hall of Fame and the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame:

* Gertrude Ederle in 1965 (USA)
* Captain Matthew Webb in 1965 (Great Britain)
* Johnny Weissmuller in 1965 (USA)
* Greta Andersen in 1969 (Denmark)
* Cavill Family in 1970 (Australia)
* Florence Chadwick in 1970 (USA)
* Annette Kellerman in 1974 (Australia)
* Keo Nakama in 1975 (USA)
* James 'Doc' Counsilman in 1976 (USA)
* John Kinsella in 1986 (USA)
* William Forest 'Buck' Dawson in 1986 (USA)
* Gerald Forsberg in 1988 (Great Britain)
* Penny Dean in 1996 (USA)
* Abdul Latif Abou Heif in 1998 (Egypt)
* Lynne Cox in 2000 (USA)
* Horacio Iglesias in 2003 (Argentina)
* Cynthia Nicholas in 2005 (Canada)
* Alison Streeter MBE in 2006 (Great Britain)
* Shelley Taylor-Smith in 2008 (Australia)
* Herman Willemse in 2008 (Netherlands)
* Kevin Murphy in 2009 (Great Britain)
* Paul Asmuth in 2010 (USA)
* Michael Read MBE in 2011 (Great Britain)
* Chad Hundeby in 2012 (USA)
* Sandra Bucha in 2014 (USA)
* Cliff Lumsdon in 2013 (Canada)
* Jon Erikson in 2014 (USA)
* Mercedes Gleitze in 2014 (Great Britain)
* Judith van Berkel-de Nijs in 2014 (Netherlands)
* George Young in 2014 (Canada)
* David Yudovin in 2014 (USA)
* Claudio Plit in 2014 (Argentina)
* Dale Petranech in 2014 (USA)
* Irene van der Laan in 2015 (Netherlands)
* Donald Watson in 2015 (USA)
* Larisa Ilchenko in 2016 (Russia)
* Desmond Renford in 2016 (Australia)
* Monique Wildschut in 2016 (Netherlands)
* Maarten van der Weijden in 2017 (Netherlands)
* Petar Stoychev in 2018 (Bulgaria)

In addition to being a dual inductee (Honour Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, Class of 2008 and Honor Open Water Swimmer in the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame, Class of 2018), Stoychev has accomplished the following in the open water swimming world.

* On 31 July 1999, he competed in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean finishing in 8 hours 1 minute 54 seconds at the age of 22.
* On 7 August 1999, he competed in the 37 km Atlantic City Around The Island Swim in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 7 hours 28 minutes 29 seconds at the age of 22.
* In 1999, he competed in the Swim Across The Sound in Connecticut in 2 hours 2 minutes 46 seconds.
* On 15 July 2000, he competed in the 37 km Atlantic City Around The Island Swim in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 8 hours 21 minutes 35 seconds at the age of 23.
* On 29 July 2000, he competed in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Canada finishing in 6 hours 25 minutes 23 seconds at the age of 23.
* He competed in the 400m freestyle and 1500m freestyle pool events at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games.
* On 29 October 2000, he competed in the 10 km race at the FINA Open Water Swimming World Championships on Oahu, Hawaii finishing in 1 hour 57 minutes 14 seconds at the age of 24.
* In 2000, he competed in the 25 km Swim Across The Sound in Connecticut finishing in 4 hours 46 minutes 4 seconds.
* On 16 July 2001, he competed in the 10 km race at the FINA World Swimming Championships in Fukuoka, Japan finishing in 2 hours 1 minutes 22 seconds at the age of 24.
* On 28 July 2001, he competed in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Canada finishing in 7 hours 3 minutes 45 seconds at the age of 24.
* In 2001, he competed in the 25 km Swim Across The Sound in Connecticut finishing in 4 hours 55 minutes 47 seconds.
* On 27 July 2002, he competed in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Canada finishing in 7 hours 32 minutes 9 seconds at the age of 25.
* In 2002, he competed in the 25 km Swim Across The Sound in Connecticut finishing in 4 hours 58 minutes 45 seconds.
* On 15 July 2003, he won the bronze medal in the 25 km race at the FINA World Championships in Barcelona, Spain finishing in 5 hours 2 minutes at the age of 26.
* On 13 July 2003, he competed in the 10 km race at the FINA World Swimming Championships in Barcelona, Spain finishing in 1 hour 51 minutes 12 seconds at the age of 26.
* On 26 July 2003, he competed in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Canada finishing in 7 hours 43 minutes 15 seconds at the age of 26.
* On 9 August 2003, he competed in the 37 km Atlantic City Around The Island Swim in Atlantic City, New Jersey finishing in 7 hours 37 minutes 24 seconds.
* On 24 August 2003, he competed in the Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli in Italy, finishing in 6 hours 47 minutes 13 seconds at the age of 26.
* On 10 July 2004, he competed in the 36 km Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli in Italy finishing in 7 hours 6 minutes 11 seconds at the age of 27.
* On 24 July 2004, he competed in the 37 km Atlantic City Around The Island Swim in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 6 hours 44 minutes 3 seconds at the age of 27.
* On 31 July 2004, he competed in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada finishing in 6 hours 23 minutes 14 seconds at the age of 27.
* In 2004, he competed in the 400m freestyle and 1500m freestyle pool events at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.
* On 26 November 2004, he competed in the FINA Open Water Swimming World Championships in Dubai, UAE finishing in 1 hour 56 minutes 6 seconds at the age of 28.
* On 2 July 2005, he competed in the 36 km Maratona del Golfo Capri-Napoli in Italy in 7 hours 17 minutes 12 seconds at the age of 28.
* On 19 July 2005, he won the bronze medal in the FINA World Swimming Championships 25 km race in Montreal, Canada finishing in 5 hours 28 seconds at the age of 28.
* On 17 July 2005, he won the bronze medal in the FINA World Swimming Championships 10 km race finishing in 1 hour 46 minutes 50 seconds at the age of 28.
* On 30 July 2005, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada in 6 hours 48 minutes 21 seconds at the age of 28.
* On 13 August 2005, he competed in the 37 km Atlantic City Around The Island Swim in Atlantic City, New Jersey finishing in 7 hours 24 minutes 12 seconds at the age of 28.
* On 29 July 2006, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada finishing in 6 hours 39 minutes 9 seconds at the age of 29.
* On 22 August 2006, he completed a crossing of the English Channel in 7 hours 21 minutes 8 seconds at the age of 29.
* On 29 August 2006, he competed in the FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships 10 km race in Napoli, Italy finishing in 2 hours 12 minutes 9 seconds at the age of 29.
* On 21 August 2006, he competed in the FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships 25 km race in Napoli, Italy finishing in 5 hours 49 minutes at the age of 29.
* On 21 January 2007, he completed the 88 km Maratón Internacional Hernandarias – Parana in Argentina finishing in 9 hours 9 minutes 33 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 26 January 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Santos, Brazil finishing in 2 hours 17 minutes 14 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 4 February 2007, he competed in the 57 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina finishing in 7 hours 29 minutes 40 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 17 March 2007, he competed in the FINA World Swimming Championships 10 km race in Melbourne, Australia finishing in 1 hour 56 minutes 2 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 19 March 2007, he competed in the FINA World Swimming Championships 25 km race finishing in 5 hours 22 minutes 55 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 7 April 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Arjman finishing in 2 hours 15 minutes 7 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 9 June 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Sevilla, Spain in 1 hour 56 minutes 41 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 17 June 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in London finishing in 1 hour 55 minutes 56 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 15 July 2007, he competed in the International Jarak-Šabac Marathon Swim in Serbia finishing in 2 hours 44 minutes 27 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 21 July 2007, he competed in the 30 km Ohrid Lake Swimming Marathon in Macedonia finishing in 5 hours 52 minutes at the age of 30.
* On 26 July 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup finishing in 2 hours 2 minutes 21 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 28 July 2007, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean finishing in 6 hours 36 minutes 29 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 4 August 2007, he won the 34 km Traversee internationale du lac Memphremagog finishing in 7 hours 44 minutes 30 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 24 August 2007, he set the record in crossing in English Channel in 6 hours 57 minutes 50 seconds, beating the record of Christof Wandratsch in 7:03:52, escorted by Michael Oram with Derek Carter as crew and Jennie Hanson and Alison Streeter as observers.
* On 23 September 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Shantou, China finishing in 1 hour 44 minutes 43 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 30 September 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Hong Kong finishing in 1 hour 44 minutes 34 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 13 October 2007, he competed in the 15 km Copa Del Mundo FINA Maraton De Natacion finishing in 3 hours 16 minutes 27 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 20 October 2007, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Cancun, Mexico finishing in 2 hours 18 seconds at the age of 30.
* On 3 February 2008, he competed in the 57 Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina finishing in 8 hours 20 minutes 9 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 9 February 2008, he competed in the 15 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Ciudad de Rosario in Argentina finishing in 2 hours 9 minutes 27 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 16 February 2008, he competed in the 15 km Maraton Patagones-Viedma International Open Water Swim in Argentina finishing in 2 hours 42 minutes 19 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 3 May 2008, he competed in the FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships in Seville, Spain finishing in 1 hour 54 minutes 35 seconds qualifying for the inaugural Olympic 10K Marathon Swim at the age of 31.
* On 5 May 2008, he competed in the FINA Open Water Swimming World Championships in Seville, Spain finishing in 5 hours 4 minutes 8 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 15 July 2008, he competed in the 19 km International Jarak-Šabac Marathon Swim in Serbia finishing in 2 hours 42 minutes 17 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 21 July 2008, he competed in the 30 km Ohrid Lake Swimming Marathon finishing in 6 hours 14 minutes 51 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 24 July 2008, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in lac St-Jean, Quebec, Canada finishing in 2 hours 4 minutes 16 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 26 July 2008, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada finishing in 7 hours 39 minutes 13 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 2 August 2008, he won the 34 km Traversée Internationale du lac Memphrémagog in Quebec, Canada finishing in 7 hours 27 minutes 25 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 8 August 2008, he competed in the 400m freestyle and later in the 1500m freestyle pool events at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.
* On 21 August 2008, he finished sixth in the inaugural Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in Beijing, China at the 2008 Summer Olympic Games finishing in 1 hour 52 minutes 9 seconds at the age of 31.
* On 24 January 2009, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Santos, Brazil finishing in 2 hours 8 minutes 5 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 1 February 2009, he competed in the 57 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina finishing in 8 hours 53 minutes 7 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 7 February 2009, he competed in the 15 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Ciudad de Rosario in Argentina finishing in 2 hours 13 minutes 59 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 14 February 2009, he competed in the 15 km Maraton Patagones-Viedma International Open Water Swim in Argentina finishing in 2 hours 47 minutes 45 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 18 April 2009, he competed in the 15 km Copa Del Mundo FINA Maraton De Natacion in Mexico finishing in 3 hours 9 minutes 49 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 27 June 2009, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Setubal Bay, Portugal finishing in 1 hour 35 minutes 33 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 17 July 2009, he competed in the FINA World Swimming Championships in Rome, Italy finishing in 1 hour 54 minutes 50 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 18 July 2009, he competed in the 30 km Ohrid Lake Swimming Marathon in Macedonia finishing in 5 hours 25 minutes 38 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 25 July 2009, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean finishing in 6 hours 58 minutes 39 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 4 October 2009, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Repulse Bay, Hong Kong finishing in 1 hour 59 minutes 45 seconds at the age of 32.
* On 25 October 2009, he competed in the 15 km Abu Dhabi Grand Prix in the UAE finishing in 2 hours 38 minutes 56 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 1 January 2010, he was voted as the 2009 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year by the World Open Water Swimming Association.
* On 24 January 2010, he competed in the Maratón Acuática Internacional Ciudad de Rosario in Argentina finishing in 1 hour 59 minutes 45 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 31 January 2010, he competed in the 57 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina finishing in 6 hours 57 minutes 52 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 6 February 2010, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Viedma, Argentina finishing in 1 hour 51 minutes 2 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 17 April 2010, he competed in the 15 km Copa Del Mundo FINA Maraton De Natacion in Mexico finishing in 3 hours 19 minutes 52 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 26 June 2010, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Setubal Bay, Portugal finishing in 2 hours 1 minute 6 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 21 July 2010, he won the bronze medal in the FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships 25 km race in lac St-Jean, Quebec, Canada finishing in 5 hours 33 minutes 50 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 17 July 2010, he competed in the FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships 10 km race in lac St-Jean, Quebec, Canada finishing in 2 hours 1 minutes 13 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 31 July 2010, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada finishing in 6 hours 40 minutes 22 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 7 August 2010, he won the 34 km Traversée Internationale du lac Memphrémagog in Quebec, Canada finishing in 7 hours 38 minutes 2 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 10 September 2010, he attempted a record 45.8 km circumnavigation swim against Mark Warkentin around Manhattan Island in New York finishing in 6 hours 28 minutes 23 seconds at the age of 33. *On 25 September 2010, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Shantou, China finishing in 2 hours 5 minutes 19 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 23 October 2010, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Fujairah, UAE finishing in 2 hours 35 seconds at the age of 33.
* On 27 October 2010, he competed in the 30 km Ohrid Lake Swimming Marathon in Macedonia finishing in 5 hours 37 minutes 39 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 23 January 2011, he competed in the Maratón Acuática Internacional Ciudad de Rosario in Argentina finishing in 2 hours 3 minutes 1 second at the age of 34.
* On 30 January 2011, he competed in the 57 km Maratón Acuática Internacional Santa Fe - Coronda in Argentina finishing in 8 hours 14 minutes 41 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 5 February 2011, he competed in the 12 Las Patagones-Viedma in Viedma, Argentina finishing in 2 hours 35 minutes 3 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 17 April 2011, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Santos, Brazil finishing in 2 hours 6 minutes 28 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 30 April 2011, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Cancun, Mexico finishing in 1 hour 54 minutes 21 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 18 June 2011, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Setubal Bay, Portugal finishing in 1 hour 40 minutes 31 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 16 July 2011, he competed in the FINA World Swimming Championships 10 km race in Shanghai, China finishing in 1 hour 55 minutes 39 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 21 July 2011, he won the FINA World Swimming Championships 25 km race in Shanghai, China finishing in 5 hours 10 minutes 39 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 30 July 2011, he won the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada finishing in 6 hours 36 minutes 30 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 6 August 2011, he won the 34 km Traversée Internationale du lac Memphrémagog in Quebec, Canada finishing in 7 hours 25 minutes 5 seconds at the age of 34.
* On 14 August 2011, he competed in the 30 km Ohrid Lake Swimming Marathon in Macedonia finishing in 5 hours 35 minutes 13 seconds at the age of 35.
* On 31 October 2011, he was nominated for the 2011 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year by the World Open Water Swimming Association.
* On 1 April 2012, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Eilat, Israel finishing in 1 hour 52 minutes 45 seconds at the age of 35.
* On 24 April 2012, he competed in the FINA 10K Marathon Swimming World Cup in Cancun, Mexico in 1 hour 57 minutes 31 seconds at the age of 35.
* On 26 April 2012, he competed in the 15 km FINA Open Water Swimming Grand Prix in Cancun, Mexico finishing in 3 hours 9 seconds at the age of 35.
* On 10 August 2012, he finished 9th in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim in the Serpentine in London in 1 hour 50 minutes 46 seconds at the age of 35, his fourth straight Summer Olympic Games participation.
* On 11 August 2012, he competed in the 30 km Ohrid Lake Swimming Marathon in Macedonia in 5 hours 19 minutes 30 seconds at the age of 35. * In 2012, he won the 19 km BCT Gdynia Marathon in Poland.
* In 2016, he won the Pirita Open in the 450m winter swimming freestyle event in 5:24.98 in 1ºC water and -2ºC air temperatures.
* In 2016, he won the 450m freestyle event at the Winter World Swimming Championships in Tyumen, Russia.
* On 10 January 2016, he was ranked #1 in the ice kilometer at the age of 39 for his 12 minute 28 second effort in 3.90°C air and 0.00°C freshwater in a lake at the Aqua Sphere Ice Swimming German Open Burghausen.
* On 6 January 2017, he won and set the world record for the 1000m ice kilometer at the 2017 Ice Swimming Aqua Sphere World Championships in Burghausen, Germany in 12:15.87.
* On 31 October 2017, he was nominated for the 2017 World Open Water Swimming Man of the Year by the World Open Water Swimming Association.
* In January 2018, he finished second in the 1 km race at the 2018 Ice Swimming Aqua Sphere German Open in Veitsbronn, Germany in 12:38.73 in 3.8°C water and 6°C air.
* He is formerly the Minister of Sport in the government of his native Bulgaria.
* He participated in the inaugural International Ice Swimming Championships and at the 10th annual Russian Open Winter Swimming Championship in Murmansk, Russia.
* He has a local beer named after him (La Stoychev) crafted by Microbrasserie du Lac Saint-Jean in St-Gédéon, Québec, Canada as a tribute to his 11 victories in the 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean.
* He was the overall winner of the FINA Open Water Swimming Grand Prix circuit for an unprecedented 11 straight years.
* He won the famed 32 km Traversée Internationale du lac St-Jean in Quebec, Canada an unprecedented 11 times.
* He won the famed 34 km Traversée Internationale du lac Memphrémagog in Quebec, Canada an unprecedented 11 times.
* He served as a member of the FINA Athletes Commission.
* He served as a member of the FINA Technical Open Water Swimming Committee.
* He was selected as the flag bearer for the Bulgarian Olympic team at the 2008 Beijing Games, where he swam both in the open water event (Olympic 10K Marathon Swim) and the 1500m freestyle in the pool. He finished 6th in the Olympic 10K Marathon Swim.
* He set the 450m freestyle International Winter Swimming Association world record at the 2016 Winter Swimming World Championships in Tyumen, Russia in 5:25.39.
* He set the overall and 40-44 age group world record in the ice kilometer with a 12:15:87 swum on 6 January 2017 in 3.4°C water and -11.10°C air in a lake in Burghausen, Germany.

Copyright © 2008-2018 by World Open Water Swimming Association

A Thank You Gift from WOWSA


WOWSA is celebrating the
1-Year Anniversary of the monthly Open Water Swimming Magazine
by giving you a free copy of the anniversary issue.

Open Water Swimming Magazine Anniversary Issue
File Size: 13MB

FREE DOWNLOAD

INSTRUCTIONS:
Download the file to your computer, and then right-click to extract the magazine which is inside the zip folder. The magazine is in PDF format.

CLICK HERE to download your free copy now.

Open Water Swimming Magazine


Open Water Swimming Magazine

The Open Water Swimming Magazine is the monthly magazine entirely focused on open water swimming heroes and heroines of every age, ability, and background. Published by the World Open Water Swimming Association, the Open Water Swimming Magazine is a free benefit to WOWSA members.

WOWSA Member Benefits include 12 issues of the Open Water Swimming Magazine, the annual 276-page Open Water Swimming Almanac, a free listing in Sponsor My Swim, outstanding product discounts from FINIS, an entry in Openwaterpedia and more...
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The Other Shore


The Other Shore follows world record holder and legendary swimmer Diana Nyad as she comes out of a thirty-year retirement to re-attempt an elusive dream: swimming 103 miles non-stop from Cuba to Florida without the use of a shark cage. Her past and present collide in her obsession with a feat that nobody has ever accomplished. At the edge of The Devil’s Triangle, tropical storms, sharks, venomous jellyfish, and one of the strongest ocean currents in the world, all prove to be life-threatening realities. Timothy Wheeler’s documentary brings Diana Nyad’s extraordinary adventure to life as Diana sets out to prove that will and determination are all you need to make the unimaginable possible.
LEARN MORE...

2014 Open Water Swimming Almanac



An Almanac for Open Water Swimming

An almanac is essentially a body of knowledge which is so complete that it enables people in different fields to make predictions about the future of their respective industries.

This, for example, was the purpose of the traditional farmers almanacs. It enabled farmers to determine as accurately as possible which crops to plant for the greatest harvests in a given year.

But the farmers almanac was just one example among many.
There are, of course, many different kinds of almanacs.

In fact, there is even one for open water swimming...

Preview the Open Water Swimming Almanac:
https://www.worldopenwaterswimmingassociation.com/preview-open-water-swimming-almanac


The trends are very clear.
The tide is rising for open water swimming.

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World Professional Marathon Swimming Federation

Open Water Race Calendar

Coaches Education Program